Manuel Ponce's Sonata Clasica for Classical Guitar - Videos, Sheet Music and Tab

Manuel Ponce
Manuel Ponce | Source

Introduction

In 1928 Mauel Ponce (1882-1948) created one of the greatest works in the classical guitar repertoire: his Sonata Clasica.

The story is that the guitarist Andres Segovia asked him to compose a piece for the guitar which was in the style of the Classical Period. The piece is deciated to Andres Segovia and its subtitle is Hommage a Fernando Sor . Fernando Sor was a leading composer during the Classical Period.

One thing that I love about this piece is that it is a Sonata in four movements. This is one of the first long, multi-movement pieces for guitar that I ever listened to. When I first discovered it I was struggling with the quesiton of whether the guitar repertoire contained any long, multi-movement pieces at all. (As compared to say, the piano repertoire, which is full of them). I have since discovered countless pieces that are this substantial. But the Ponce Sonatas will always be special to me because they were the first pieces like that that I listened to.

Sonata Clasica: Movement I

The Fourth Movement is also one of my favorites.  Here it is, played by the famous Ana Vidovic.

Sonata Clasica: Movement IV

Recommended Recording

The recording that I own of this piece is by the legendary guitarist Jason Vieaux.  Not only does it have Sonata Clasica, but it has all of the Sonatas that Ponce composed!  It is a delight to listen to, and I heartily recommend it!

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Comments 3 comments

Derdriu 5 years ago

Ari Lamstein: Thank you for the background information, as well as the two partial performances of the sonata. They both are exquisite.

Voted up, etc.,

Derdriu


Belfer 3 years ago

Highly appreciate your work but would kindly ask you not to repeat this utter hoax that " The guitar repertoire simply does not have many multi-movement works". Indeed, the hoax was created by Andres Segovia himself to diminish those few hundreds (to put it with accademic reservation) works from classical and baroque period that Maestro decided to ignore.


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Ari Lamstein 3 years ago from San Francisco, CA Author

@Belfer: You are absolutely right. I updated the text. Thank you for your comment!

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