Rosin In The Blood : The Rutland Family Tradition Of Old Time Fiddlers "Georgia Slim"

Source

The Roots of Traditional Fiddling

Is musical talent inherited? I cannot say for sure, but it often seems to be the case in some families. My Mother’s side of the family seems to have been especially gifted in the musical talent department. I feel so lucky in that some of the Rutland musical DNA was passed on to me.

For over 160 years (and perhaps much longer) the Rutland descendants have filled the south with music. You would be hard pressed to find a male Rutland descendant ( and some females also) who has not tried his hand at some musical instrument or another. But the instrument which has given the Rutland name the most honor and fame has been the fiddle.

From our English and Irish roots we inherited a love for this wonderful object. It speaks to us of our ancestors and the music of our homeland in the same voice it spoke to them. As you will see, the fiddle tunes represent history and deep family ties which reverberate in a Rutland’s soul.

Meeting A Legend

I come from a long line of fiddlers. It seemed as if almost every one of my uncles and older cousins owned a fiddle on the Rutland side of the family. As a child in the fifties I remember visiting my Rutland grandparents with my mom because “cousin” Robert was visiting.

Robert had brought his nephew with him on this visit from Valdosta. His nephew was about nine years old and dressed in the style of the day for boys his age. Cowboy hat, boots, shirt, and double six-shooters of course, were worn with complete abandon.

Cousin Robert carried a small guitar case in his hand as he stepped up on the veranda. The latticework around the porch was covered in Heavenly Blue morning glory vines whose blossoms reflected a wonderful blue color against the shaded white walls. They created a backdrop for my memories of this day. It’s funny how bright colors seem to stick in a child’s mind.

But it would only be much later in my life before I realized what a wonderful musician Robert Rutland was.  And it was at an even later time that I would discover this inherited musical ability possessed by so many of the Rutland descendants in this area. 

"Rutland's Reel" named for Robert Rutland

The Story of Rutland's Reel

Robert "Georgia Slim" Rutland is said to have found the music for Rutland's Reel in his Grandfather's fiddle music book. He and "Howdy" Forrester, who played with Slim in Texas, added parts to the old fiddle song and Howdy is said to have named it Rutland's Reel in honor of his twin fiddling partner.

A wonderful rendition which echoes the sounds from the old country, it evokes tradition and honor for these wonderful old time fiddlers. It is a favorite among the purists of traditional fiddle music aficionados.


The Rutlands Came Down To Georgia

I didn’t know it back then, but Robert Rutland was a renowned musician. “Georgia Slim” was his stage name as he toured around the country. A wonderful piece of fiddle music was named for him. “Rutland’s Reel” seems to resound with both sadness and joy. It is reminiscent of the Irish and English influence on early southern fiddle music which came down from the Carolinas with my great grandfather.

Our first Rutland ancestors were here in America before the beginning of the 18th century. Did they bring a fiddle with them on the boat? I would wager they were impelled to by the same longings their descendants experience today. Timeless vibrations? Could be, perhaps this is the answer to the puzzling enigma.

But when my Great Grandfather came down to Southern Georgia, he bequeathed his musical talent to his progeny. He could have given us nothing more valuable than the need for music in our lives. Not something we can lose if times are bad, but something to help soothe us if they do.

Robert "Georgia Slim" Rutland Fiddle Music

Raw Fiddle
Raw Fiddle

Georgia Slim plays traditional fiddle music.

 
Rutland's Reel
Rutland's Reel

Patrick McAvinue's Rutland's Reel

 

Fiddle Music In the Swamps And Countryside

My great grandfather apparently passed on the musical genes to many of his scions because the South Georgia swamps and countryside rang with reels and waltzes at the turn of the 20th century.  My cousin Henry Rutland still plays great granddad’s fiddle which survived The Civil War, or as we refer to it down here, “The War of Northern Aggression.”

Music, especially fiddle music, was the main source of entertainment at the many “cane grindin’s” and “corn shuckin’s” which passed for social events in the rural countryside of Southern Georgia.  These autumn “frolics” were looked forward to by the young folk as well as the old and having a good fiddler on hand guaranteed attendance by both.

Other accompaniment by guitars or banjos were almost nonexistent until the 20th century, but the fiddle was enough for most gatherings to dance to.  Fiddlers were in much demand with the Rutlands doing more than their part of the entertaining in the isolated parts of this country.   


Hearing the old fiddle once more!

Robert "Georgia Slim" Rutland

Robert “Georgia Slim” Rutland is only one of our clan who became known as a wonderful fiddle player. He won the National Old Time Fiddling Contest and is firmly ensconced in the Country Music Hall of Fame. During the 1940’s he performed with the top musicians of the day and is remembered fondly by everyone who knew him or had the pleasure of hearing him perform.

Georgia Slim spent time in Texas performing on the radio twice a day during the 1940’s. He and Howdy Forrester played double fiddling tunes along with Slim’s band “The Texas Roundup. Along with Roy Acuff, Ray Price and many other country stars, he gained a reputation of being at the top of the list of those with fiddling expertise.

Even though I was fortunate enough to have known him, it was later in my life before I knew the extent of his fame as a fiddler. He was not the sort to boast about his past or his fame. What I learned about him came from those who knew about his life before I was born. I wish now I had known about his fame so I could have asked him about his experiences.

But “Georgia Slim” died in 1969 at the age of 53. I had no interest in his type of music and preferred to perform “rock and roll” instead of the “country stuff” I had been exposed to as a child. This was my fault of course and I regret it deeply. Often, appreciation comes too late to make much difference. But perhaps I am incorrect in this observation as I am trying to show my honor for him now.

Henry Rutland And George Custer At The Worlds Fair

When I began to look further into the life of “Georgia Slim” I found something very fascinating to me. There were other famous fiddlers in the area who also continued the Rutland fiddling tradition.

Another of my cousins, Henry Rutland, who was the nephew and student of Georgia Slim, had achieved quite a following as someone who could play the old fiddle tunes too.

Henry still plays the old fiddle our Great Grandfather carried with him through the Civil War. A wonderful video of him playing a period piece on the old fiddle is featured on this page. The person playing the bass fiddle with Henry is Burt Rutland, son of “Georgia Slim.”

This song is being played at the foot of the grave of the man who originally owned the fiddle Henry is playing. The tune is one which Great Grandfather played on the old fiddle himself during the war. Did the music drift down to his soul and make him smile at hearing his old fiddle again? I certainly hope so!

But I am not finished with the Rutland music legacy yet. Another cousin descended from Lawrence Green Rutland also shares fame as a fiddler. George Custer has also made his mark on the south by the same fiddling efforts as the others. He and Henry played several daily shows at the 1982 Worlds Fair as the only double fiddlers invited to perform. He also played with Georgia Slim and learned much from “Uncle Bob.”

George Custer is also the recipient of the Florida Heritage Award and has been a judge at the National Old Time Fiddling Championship for many years. There is no getting away from one's roots it seems. Lucky for all of us.

The Legacy Of Sound

There are so many of us Rutland descendants who play some musical instrument or another that it would seem repetitious to even list the names or the instruments played. We cannot help ourselves. We are impelled by our instincts to fulfill our destiny, just as our ancestors were.

After the little boy in the cowboy getup and I played for awhile and the grownups had visited their fill, “Georgia Slim” asked the child to play a song on the guitar for Aunt Tisha. The little boy protested but eventually agreed.

I was dumbfounded at the music coming from the small guitar. “Georgia Slim” had taught his nephew to play at a very early age as he had done for so many of his kin. A timeless lesson for the future generation, one which would bear wonderful fruit, as you have witnessed. Music is one of our rites of passage into manhood in the Rutland clan. Can you think of anything more timeless or beautiful?

More by this Author


Comments 67 comments

Hello, hello, profile image

Hello, hello, 6 years ago from London, UK

This is a wonderfully written hub. Country Music is one of my favourite music. I thoroughly enjoyed watching and listening to your videos. This music is so awesome and I hope it will be carried on forever. At the moment music became an absolute rubbish and I hope they close down and start afresh. Thank you so much for this wonderful hub.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thank you so much, Hello hello! I wrote this hub for my own enjoyment, something I have not done lately. Only when I began researching my family's musical past did I realize what an impact music has had on the Rutland clan and how many of us inherited the tradition.

Thanks again!


ralwus 6 years ago

Wonderful insight into your heritage Randy. Yes, we did reject the old timey stuff didn't we? But we came back to it and that's all that really matters. I truly loved the videos old son and the story. thanks for sharing it.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks to you, ralwus, for reading my hub! Yes, the old fiddle is still wonderful despite the rarity of this type of music nowadays. We all have wonderful folks in our families past. And future, hopefully!


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa

An awesome Hub. Thanks so much for sharing some of your family history with us, and the wonderful music. I have a CD of Appalachian music which I love. Those vids are simply great!

Love and peace

Tony


Sufidreamer profile image

Sufidreamer 6 years ago from Sparti, Greece

Great Hub and a fantastic slice of family history, Randy. I am pretty sure that I heard Rutland's reel when I lived in Ireland - the tune is certainly familiar.

I love the way that folk music has no boundaries - Glad to hear that the tradition runs on the family :)


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Glad you enjoyed the music, Tony! I am so lucky to have such wonderful musicians in my family. Thanks for the great comments!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

I appreciate the input, Sufidreamer! Yes, there is an old English tune called the "Rutland Reel" but I think it is a different arrangement from Rutland England. Perhaps my ancestors came from there in the late 1600's. I am trying to find out where my forefathers came from when they entered N.C but so far, no luck.

Yes, making music is still a family tradition and hopefully, will continue to be so.

Thank you for your kind comments!


habee profile image

habee 6 years ago from Georgia

Randy, this is a wonderful hub! You definitely got the Rutland music gene. I loved the Rutland Reel - it gave me goosebumps!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks Holle! Yes, Rutland's reel is very special to me for several reasons. Better go ahead and buy your Rutland grandson a fiddle! The Rutland boys usually teethe on a rosin block or fiddle bow, but it's not too late! LOL!


Kaie Arwen profile image

Kaie Arwen 6 years ago

THIS WAS FUN!!!!!!! I love fiddles......... thank you!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thank you right back, Kaie! Glad you enjoyed the fiddle music! It was fun for me too!!!!


md_azamkhan profile image

md_azamkhan 6 years ago

really its very good


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Glad you enjoyed my hub, MD! Thanks for the comment!


Garlic Angel profile image

Garlic Angel 6 years ago from Dublin

Wow great Hub _ I am not a great fan of fiddle music but I have to say I love ‘The Rutland Reel’ Excellent... I have bookmarked this so I can come back and enjoy it some more.. Thank you for sharing your love of music with us Randy.. Music can bring us great joy and lift our spirits when feeling a little low... Thank you for lifting my spirit with your lovely music.. Garlic Angel :-)


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

I appreciate your taking the time to read my hub, Garlic Angel! Like you, I once paid little attention to fiddle music but have grown to appreciate it as I got older. It seems to speak of times gone by and culture now forgotten.

Thank you for the kind comments and I am now following you too!


ericsomething profile image

ericsomething 6 years ago from Charleston, SC and Riverside, CA

Love it! This is definitely front-porch-pickin' music.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

I'm glad you enjoyed the music, Eric! And I'm sure many a front porch has been the scene for just such sounds. Thanks for stopping by!


Fiddleman profile image

Fiddleman 6 years ago from Zirconia, North Carolina

Thank you Randy for sharing this with me, I love old fiddles and your granddads fiddle is a priceless treasure and still has some beautiful tunes. Great fiddling. From all I have read there were many who played fiddle during the Civil War and I had purchased a CD of Civil War era music. It seems there was a measure of revival during this time and at at battle site a soldier had been saved and wanted to be baptized. the war stopped as a baptism was held and a fiddler played the hymn There is a Fountain. It blessed my soul reading that and as I thought about the One who can bring real peace in the midst of life's many battles and storms. There is just something about old fiddles that intrigue me, I so appreciate your sharing this and I am going to post this video on my FB page. God bless you and your family.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Sorry I missed your comment somehow, Fiddleman! Wonderful story about the Civil War! Thanks for great input and for linking this hub to your FB page! I really enjoyed writing this hub!

Randy


Christopher Price profile image

Christopher Price 5 years ago from Vermont, USA

You are blessed with a wonderful inheritance, and it is obvious your family members celebrate the gift of music.

The videos were great. Your Great Grandfather's fiddle must mean more to you all than a Stradivarius!

The second largest city in Vermont is Rutland. You may want to investigate if there is any connection to your family. Though I would imagine our Rutland was named after the city in England, one of your relatives may have had something to do with the choice of names!

CP


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Hello Chris. Yes, I wondered about Rutland Vermont myself, but haven't found a connection yet. I have since found where my ancestors came from in England but nothing concerning fiddle playing by them.

We are proud to have the fiddle and the old sheet music written by him. And of course his old Bible which he carried with him through the Civil War.

Thanks for your time and for the great input, Chris!

Randy


Susie Rutland Harris 5 years ago

Randy, I am very impressed ! Why haven't I known what a great writer you are ??!!! And I'd sure like to know what you've learned from our ancestry in England. We need to talk, Cousin and fellow Epic partner ! I hope you won't mind that I shared your great article via Facebook link...too late now! :) I know others in our family will be excited to read it and watch the video! I'm so happy to have happen-stanced upon your Hubpages! Really great information you're sharing here!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

@Susie Rutland Harris--Glad you enjoyed my article about our talented family, Cuz! Mom has the latest info concerning our English roots but I haven't got a copy yet.

Thanks for posting the link for me as I enjoyed writing about our family's penchant for music. But you know that, you've made your share of music too!

Good to hear from you and thanks again for reading my hubs!

Your cousin,

Randy


Wesman Todd Shaw profile image

Wesman Todd Shaw 5 years ago from Kaufman, Texas

Thank you very much for this hub, Sir. I've been seeing that snake everywhere for forever. I apologise for having never commented (so far as I recall) before.

Is musical talent inherited? Yes, I think that it is - but of course I have no actual facts to back that up with, just years and years of observations.

I love these old time fiddle music get togethers, both large and small. My hometown is attempting to start one, and I'm rather excited about it!

Culture in America needs all the help that it can get from folks like you, Fiddleman, and I'll keep trying to do what I can as well.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

I'm glad you visited this hub, WTS! It's one of my favorite as it's near to my heart. This side of my family is so musically talented that it has to be inherited!

I try to do my part in keeping the tradition alive, even though my surname doesn't come from my mother's side of the family.

Great news on your hometown trying to revive the old music. There is still quite a bit being played down here in the swamps of Georgia.

Thanks again for stopping by and I'll be sure to check out your hubs too!

Randy


Wesman Todd Shaw profile image

Wesman Todd Shaw 5 years ago from Kaufman, Texas

Same here - it's not the Shaw's of Kaufman, Texas that are musically inclined - it's the Coker family!

I must admit now that having visited the Walnut Valley Festival in Winfield, Kansas three times - every time I've been a pair of Shaw brothers from Kentucky either placed prominently in the flatpick contest, or won it. Those same two guys also competed in banjo,fiddle, and mandolin contests - OH MY those boys are talented!

I like to imagine that I'm relatives of theirs!

I'm excited about the hometown thing - Your state's old time legend is maybe my personal favourite, Norman Blake.

I hope to be an old man someday that sits around outside picking half so well as Norman Blake does!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Don't we all, WTS! LOL!


Wesman Todd Shaw profile image

Wesman Todd Shaw 5 years ago from Kaufman, Texas

Any chance you have "The Rutland Reel" tabbed out anywhere???

That would be a great one that few know!

I think I could get the B part, but the A section of it would be a real challenge for me to try to tab out, or play by ear.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

I actually haven't searched for a tab, Wesman. In fact, I didn't know it existed until I began researching Robert's musical career closer for this hub. There are several versions of the reel on Youtube, though.

I bet my cousin Henry--playing my great grandfather's fiddle in the video- might have it tabbed out, but I'm not certain.


Wesman Todd Shaw profile image

Wesman Todd Shaw 5 years ago from Kaufman, Texas

I'm not really a candidate to compete in any flatpicking contests - but I know for certain that sometimes playing a lesser known tune like that can really make an impression on judges!

Also - it's just a great tune to begin with! I really like Hornpipes and Reels so far as fiddle tunes go.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Yep, judges often like something different from what they usually hear in contests. I need to get a new bridge for my mandolin so I can fool around with it a little more.

A non-musical, but curious, friend didn't know how to do anything but tighten the tuning pegs on mine without my knowledge. A few hours after he left I heard a loud "twang" as the bridge collapsed from the strain of the overtightened strings. DOH!


trish1048 profile image

trish1048 4 years ago

Hi Randy,

I chose to read this hub because of the word rosin. It brought an instant memory to me of The Devil Went Down to Georgia.

My father was from Oklahoma, and was a huge fan of country music. I grew up listening to it, and I sadly confess, I hated it. Then along came the mid-60s when I met my future hubby. It turned out that he too, grew up with country music in his blood, and loved it. He did own a guitar and liked to sit with his best friend and sing. It seems as I was destined to give in, and I came to love the music. I didn't know anyone who played a fiddle, but I sure did hear plenty of fiddle playing. I enjoyed the video, however, the second one wouldn't play, it said video player is too small.

I thoroughly enjoyed this non-fiction story :)


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Like you Trish, I didn't learn to appreciate country, or old time fiddle music until I was older because I played R&R in a band for many years.

Sorry you couldn't see the second video as it is about the old fiddle my great-grandfather played during the Civil War. I just checked and I too cannot view it. I wonder what has changed to prevent it working? My cousin can really play it well. Glad you visited this one.

SSSSS


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

I've now fixed the problem with the video I believe ,Trish. Enjoy!

SSSSS


trish1048 profile image

trish1048 4 years ago

Hi Randy,

I'm sorry, but I am still getting the same message and it won't play :(


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Sorry again, Trish! It works well in the edit mode but not when published. I wonder if the new "idle " feature is affecting this youtube video? I'll have to contact the staff as this video is important to the hub. Rats!!

SSSSS


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Trish, or whoever else has attempted to view the last video and gets the "video play er is too small" message, it can be viewed by clicking on the Youtube icon on the bottom of the video screen. In the meantime I am trying to resolve this issue. Thanks!

SSSSS


trish1048 profile image

trish1048 4 years ago

Hi Randy,

The YouTube icon worked. I loved the music so much that I got up and danced :)

Are there any more videos of that wonderful music?


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Hello again, Trish. So glad you finally got the video to work. Yes, this is merely one of three tunes my cousin played on my great-grandfather's old fiddle that day. But it was made on videotape and we only changed the one tune over to digital format. Perhaps I should change the others too. Thanks for coming back and trying again! :)

SSSSS


trish1048 profile image

trish1048 4 years ago

It would be great to see the others. :)


jorutland 4 years ago

Great story. Proud of our Rutland heritage!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks for checking it out. cousin! I too am proud of our heritage besides the musical abilities some of us possess. So glad we still have knowledge of our past ancestors too. Thanks again!

Randy


Wayne Brown profile image

Wayne Brown 3 years ago from Texas

Music has a way of spreading through generations of a family like a plague. My dad played fiddle as did one of his brothers, his father, and his uncle as well. I asked my dad one time how he learned and he replied that he beat his brothers back home from the cotton patch. I knew then that it would take much more than that for me to master the fiddle. Still I did inherit the desire to perform music which I do with the guitar in a less than stellar fashion...still love it though. You have some very talented roots and I enjoyed greatly reading about them. ~WB


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks for the comments and your insight into our ancestor's musical past, Wayne. I'm glad you picked up the guitar as I have, but I first learned to play the 5 string banjo long before I tried guitar. I made money playing professionally for many years but never had time to learn the fiddle well enough to suit my taste.

Perhaps it was because I tried to learn "The Devil Came Down To Georgia" as My first tune. Yep, I picked out a hard one to begin with, no doubt!

I'll bet your dad listened to Georgia Slim (Robert Rutland) in the 40's as he had a twice daily radio show in Texas at the time. I like to think so at any rate. :)

Glad you enjoyed the history. It's a smaller world than we imagine sometimes.

Randy


bravewarrior profile image

bravewarrior 3 years ago from Central Florida

Randy, thank you so much for turning me onto this hub. The fiddlin' is amazing and the fact that the particular fiddle in the video has been handed down for generations is awesome. There must be so much soul that is felt just by holding it - I can't imagine the life it must exude!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Yes, we are so proud to still have this old fiddle in our family and Henry plays it so well too! This is only one of the 3 tunes he played on the video and all were those played by my great-Grandfather during the war. The sheet music for these songs were still in his old fiddle case. Did I mention we were proud of our fiddlin' family? lol!

I'm glad you appreciate our legacy, I know I do! Thanks again, Shauna! :)

--RG


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada.

No, Randy, I cannot "think of anything more timeless or beautiful" than having the heritage and gift of music. The video with Henry playing Bile the Cabbage Down is near and dear to my heart. My Father used to play it on his banjo. I learned to play banjo from my Dad and I loved it. One of the first songs I learned was Bile Them Cabbage Down. I also played it on my mountain dulcimer or autoharp when I was a member of a folk group many years ago. This hub of memories and family history is wonderful and brings back loving memories to me of times past. My eldest brother played guitar and sang in just about every CW saloon in the US, he was a cowboy/truck driver and well-loved by everyone he met. His guitar was practically glued to him -- it went everywhere he did. My son is a very good guitarist who writes his own music and is awesome on drums. He has appeared concerts in Japan and other countries, and also plays local gigs in his area.

"But perhaps I am incorrect in this observation as I am trying to show my honor for him now." ... and you showed honour to him in a wonderful way by doing what you do beautifully, writing about him and your Mother's family history. This is an awesome hub and one you should be very proud of. Bless you for doing this and bringing up my own family memories. Thank you.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada.

PS: You have honoured your entire family by writing this hub.


dahoglund profile image

dahoglund 2 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids

You are fortunate to be associated with such a music tradition. My oldest brother was a musician who played a number of instruments, including violin. He would cringe at the term fiddle.I had no ability to play an instrument, although I tried to learn guitar. I wish us northerners would seek out and learn our own musical traditions instead of having to borrow all the southern ones., although they are great. up votes and sharing.


LadyFiddler profile image

LadyFiddler 2 years ago from Somewhere in the West

This is sooo awesome! It drew my attention because i am an intermediate violin student..... i know the song boil them cabbage down but obviously cannot even start to play it like your cousin henry. He is excellent and fiddle style always sounds sweeter. The violin is tuff stuff to learn got to have a lot of patience. If your naturally musically inclined then your just great at it. My mum side of the family are natural born singers and can play musical instruments to by ear..... but it seems like i got my daddy's genes with the instrument part. I can sing however ;)


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

So pleased you found this hub interesting, Phyllis! I too leaned the banjo at an early age. The first song I learned was Flatt and Scruggs "Foggy Mountain Breakdown"- the theme song to 'Bonnie and Clyde' for those who aren't familiar with it. I later went on to learn guitar and played in a R&R band for may years.

I suppose the Rutland genes are still strong in my part of the family. I'm very happy this hub struck a chord with you and your family. Thanks as always for your great comments and time. :)


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

So pleased to hear from you, Don! Long time no see. :) Yes a fiddle or violin is called such by the type of music wrung out of it and either way, is a wonderful instrument no matter who is playing it. I am indeed proud of my ancestors and kin who established such a tradition in our family.

This tradition had lots to do with my fictional tale, "Spirit of Old Savannah" an effort to mix magic and music. Thanks again for your nice comments, Don. :)


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Lady Fiddler--Although I have a fiddle I've never spent much time with it being I have learned too many other instruments by the time I received it. Yes, it does take a certain feel for it and I admire those who put the time in to learn the old tunes.

Henry and our other cousin were the only fiddlers chosen to play at the World's Fair in Tennessee years ago and we're very proud of their representation of our talented family. Thanks so much for reading and your input on this hub. :)


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 2 years ago from southern USA

I cannot think of anything more timeless or beautiful, Randy! I truly enjoyed reading your fascinating family history of fiddle players. You have indeed brought honor to your family here in this wonderful piece of writing. Enjoyed listening to both videos. Such a lovely sound.

Voted up ++++ tweeting, pinning, G+ and sharing this one too

Hope you are having a lovely Sunday in Southern Georgia.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Faith Reaper--I enjoyed writing this history of my family's talented musicians,especially the fiddle players of the clan. Many of the clan also play other instruments, including myself.

Thank you for taking the time to read and comment so kindly about my efforts. :)


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 2 years ago from southern USA

Oh, my pleasure! I meant to add that I loved how you wrote about the Heavenly Blue morning glory vines, as we had them growing in our yard as a child and a backyard full of Dogwood trees too. I remember I tried to catch them opening in the morning as a child, but never did, although I did catch them closing a few times.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Those morning glory blooms were so beautiful at the time, it just stuck in my young mind as if it were imprinted on it, as I suppose it was indeed, Theresa. :)


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 16 months ago from High desert of Nevada.

Hey, Randy - I did read this quite awhile ago, but enjoyed reading it again. You have a remarkably talented family. Thanks for pointing me back here again.

It was great to read Wayne's comment. I sure miss him round these here parts.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 16 months ago from Southern Georgia Author

I thought you had read this hub but I wasn't sure, Phyllis. :) I too miss Wayne around here among so many others who made this place unique. It seems we have more loyalty to HP than they do for their veteran writers. :o


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 16 months ago from High desert of Nevada.

Yep, I miss all the old timers that graced HP. At least Will comes back once in awhile. So glad you are here.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 16 months ago from Southern Georgia Author

Glad you're still around also, Phyllis. I think we all feel as this is a meeting place for all us oldies despite the way we've been treated in the last few years. HP has tool the life out of this once former meeting place for writers. Alas....


Alastar Packer profile image

Alastar Packer 10 months ago from North Carolina

Oh my goodness what an awesomite hub Rosin in the Blood is. Enjoyed the read, and the videos stirred my English Scot-Irish soul thoroughly. So your great-grand came from Carolina...hmm. Music sure is in your family DNA alright!:)


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 5 months ago from Southern Georgia Author

Somehow I missed your comment, Alastar. Yes, my great-grandfather came down from North Carolina to be an overseer on a slave plantation where he eloped with the owner's daughter just before the Civil War began. Another story I will put to words one of these days. Thanks as always for your kind words old friend.


Alastar Packer profile image

Alastar Packer 4 months ago from North Carolina

Dat's ok my friend. What another great read the overseer's elopement with Big Daddy's daughter will be! Btw, got a new one on Mists and Moonlight about Fort Fisher you might like. Some fairly cool pics anyway:)


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 4 months ago from Southern Georgia Author

Thanks Alastar, for some reason I no longer get notifications of new posts on your fine site.


Alastar Packer profile image

Alastar Packer 4 months ago from North Carolina

Non-monetized as it is I tried to keep expenses down. But, you get what you pay for, so I upgraded last night and will get things right now. Tired of being a dinosaur blogger anyway lol. Thanks , Randy.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working