Film Review - Shenandoah (1965)

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INTRODUCTION

'Shenandoah' is one of the very best films in the Western genre, a movie which takes the very greatest crisis of American history and looks at the personal story of a family caught up in the tragedy of violent conflict. It is a powerful and evocative drama about one man's attempts to keep his family together in the midst of the escalating conflict of the American Civil War.

Made in 1965 by well known director of Westerns, Andrew V McLagen, and featuring James Stewart, one of the greatest and most popular of film stars from the Golden Era of the Hollywood Western, 'Shenandoah' is a movie to stir the emotions, and a movie which should appeal even to those who have no fondness for this particular movie genre.

'Shenandoah' is, in my opinion, one of the most powerful Civil War dramas ever to come out of Hollywood.


WHAT'S THE STORY ?

Charlie Anderson is a home-loving man, a farmer, and a widower. He works his land in the beautiful Shenandoah Valley in the State of Virginia, and in this he is assisted by his large and devoted family of six sons, one daughter, and one daughter-in-law. Although he still grieves for his long dead wife, and struggles hard to keep his family together with good Christian values in accordance with the last wishes of his wife, Charlie is basically content. A lot of love exists in his family, he's beholding to no one, and the only real worry he has in normal times is how to get the harvest in on time.

But times are no longer normal. The American Civil War is raging. Charlie wants no part of it - it's not his conflict, and as far as he's concerned, it doesn't affect him. All he wants is for the warring factions to stay off his land and leave him and his family at peace. Unfortunately, Charlie is trying to hold back a relentless tide, and the war is coming closer and closer, threatening to sweep across his land and change his life forever. Soldiers from the Confederates come looking for new recruits from amongst Charlie's grown-up sons, and then there is a visit from a state official looking to acquire horses and supplies for the army - a visit which ends in a fist fight. And one of his sons, Jacob, has a growing unease about the family's refusal to play its part in the conflict. Still Charlie resists, and family life goes on. His daughter Jennie gets married, and his daughter-in-law Ann has a baby.

But then the youngest of his sons, known only as 'Boy', encounters a Union patrol near the farm, and mistakenly the patrol assumes him to be a rebel soldier. 'Boy' is taken prisoner, and carted away. And now Charlie can no longer stand back. Now he is involved whether he likes it or not. He has to go looking for 'Boy', and so he sets off on a quest with his family to find him, leaving only James and Ann at the farmhouse. It's a quest from which his family cannot emerge unscathed as he is led into violent contact with Union forces, and tragic encounter with Confederate forces. Along the way his family experiences both heartache and happiness. All the time Charlie's mission is clear - to find his son, and to keep the rest of his family together.


Charlie Anderson and the whole family united - as they always are - for the evening meal
Charlie Anderson and the whole family united - as they always are - for the evening meal

MAIN CAST & CHARACTERS

ACTOR
CHARACTER
James Stewart
Charlie Anderson
Doug McClure
Sam
Rosemary Forsyth
Jennie Anderson
Glen Corbett
Jacob Anderson
Patrick Wayne
James Anderson
Katherine Ross
Ann Anderson
Phillip Alford
'Boy' Anderson
Denver Pyle
Pastor Bjoerling
George Kennedy
Colonel Fairchild

THE FACTS OF THE FILM

DIRECTOR : Andrew V McLaglen

WRITER :

  • James Lee Barrett

YEAR OF RELEASE : 1965

RUNNING TIME : 105 minutes

GENRE : Western

GUIDENCE : Some violence and war deaths, but nothing very gory

ACADEMY NOMINATIONS :

  • Waldon O Watson (Best Sound)

James Stewart as Charlie Anderson
James Stewart as Charlie Anderson
Rosemary Forsyth as Charlie's daughter Jennie (with Doug McClure as Sam)
Rosemary Forsyth as Charlie's daughter Jennie (with Doug McClure as Sam)
Katherine Ross as daughter-in-law Ann
Katherine Ross as daughter-in-law Ann
Denver Pyle as Pastor Bjoerling
Denver Pyle as Pastor Bjoerling
Gene Jackson plays Gabriel
Gene Jackson plays Gabriel
George Kennedy is Colonel Fairchild. Perhaps his role is rather too brief to be seriously considered, but Kennedy's performance is, in my opinion, of Oscar standard
George Kennedy is Colonel Fairchild. Perhaps his role is rather too brief to be seriously considered, but Kennedy's performance is, in my opinion, of Oscar standard

KEY CHARACTERS AND PERFORMANCES

Without question the central character in this movie is Charlie Anderson. Cigar-smoking Charlie is stubborn, sometimes cantankerous, aggressive in defence of his way of life, but always loving and supportive of his family. At times grief-stricken and distraught, at times content with his growing family, this is one of the very finest moments in the career of one of Hollywood's greats - James Stewart.

Charlie's children are for the most part fairly anonymous, and none of their characters are deeply explored. Perhaps because of the strong family environment in which they have been brought up, individual personalities have not been able to flourish. Only one is married at the beginning of the movie, and one gets married during the movie. Only one - Jacob (Glen Corbett) - has clear views which may be contrary to those of his father, and only one - 'Boy' - has a significant role away from the Anderson's farm. Phillip Alford performs this role well.

Sam is the most prominent of the other characters in the movie. He is a Confederate Officer who becomes engaged and married to Charlie's daughter. Sam is played by Doug McClure as a socially awkward and tongue-tied young man, in love with Jennie, but respectfully nervous in the presence of her father. It's actually a very accomplished characterisation.

Denver Pyle gives a nice, almost comedic performance as the long suffering Pastor Bjoerling who is constantly having his church services disrupted by the late arrival of Charlie and his entourage.

Gene Jackson plays Gabriel - Boy's friend - a character who is involved twice in the story, each time in quite pivotal events. As a young black slave. Gabriel represents one of the major social triggers for war.

And mention must also be made of George Kennedy. Kennedy has only a minor cameo role, but it is a role which is truly memorable. He plays a war-weary, disillusioned Union Army Colonel, whom Charlie Anderson approaches in his attempt to find his son. The Colonel sympathises kindly, but points out the immense difficulties which the father faces in his quest. It's a touching portrayal of a man who, even though he's on the winning side, is tired of death and a life of tragedy.


Charlie Anderson vigorously rejects the attempt of the Confederate Lt Johnson who has come to recruit more troops from amongst his six sons
Charlie Anderson vigorously rejects the attempt of the Confederate Lt Johnson who has come to recruit more troops from amongst his six sons

NEGATIVES ?

There are few significant negatives in this film unless one finds the cloying sentimentality too much. Some viewers may, but for me the film is sufficiently well scripted and well acted, for the sentimentality to become believable.

Perhaps some scenes are a bit too contrived - notably the theatrical fist fight and the rather fortuitous rescue of 'Boy' from the battlefield. These are brief moments which are not entirely credible, but I believe they can be excused in the overall excellence of the movie.

TRIVIA

The period of the Civil War in which this movie is set is not made overtly clear, but at one stage a Confederate Corporal states the 'Yankees have broken through at Winchester'. This happened on 19th September 1864.

This was the film debut of Katherine Ross.

The music which bookends the movie and plays intermittently throughout is, of course, the great folk song which bears the same name as the movie. 'Shenandoah' dates at least to the early part of the 19th century, and remains to this day one of the most beautiful of all American folk songs.


Sam, in a socially awkward but comic moment, asks Charlie for his daughter's hand in marriage
Sam, in a socially awkward but comic moment, asks Charlie for his daughter's hand in marriage
And Charlie offers some homespun advice
And Charlie offers some homespun advice

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO WATCH THIS FILM ...

Shenandoah
Shenandoah

DVD - U.S.A and Canada

 
Shenandoah
Shenandoah

Amazon Instant Video

 

FAVOURITE SCENES

Just like Charlie Anderson, this film shies away from pointedly taking sides in the conflict. Both Union and Confederate soldiers act in ways which are both good and bad. Only once is a clear stand taken by the director, and it creates an uplifting scene which embodies what so much of this conflict was all about - the emancipation of the slaves. Gabriel is a friend of Charlie's youngest son. He is also a slave (though not 'belonging' to Charlie). Following the capture of 'Boy', Gabriel is told by Union soldiers that he is now free. There follows this conversation with Jennie:

  • I don't gotta go back, do I missy? Man say I'm free. Don't that mean I don't gotta go back?
  • Well if the man said you're free Gabriel, I guess that means you can go anywhere in the world you wanna go.
  • You mean I can just just walk down that road and keep on walking?
  • You can run if you like Gabriel.

With that, Gabriel says goodbye and sets off down the road, a free man to do as he wishes. He leaves to the musical accompaniment on film of 'John Brown's Body'. It's almost - but not quite - the last we see of Gabriel.

The movie is full of good sequences. Sam's awkwardly expressed request to marry Jennie, and Charlie's stern yet fatherly advice, is well observed (and depicted opposite). The church scenes are also well handled, and the battlefield action is believably filmed. All emotions are credibly presented.

To conclude this section on a note of some levity, humour does punctuate the drama in this story. Confederate and Union troops are lined up facing each other across a field, when the tension is broken by a stray cow wandering between them. The leader of the Confederate forces turns to his subordinate:

  • 'Lieutenent .. is that a Confederate cow or a Union cow?'
  • 'That must be a Union cow sir.'
  • 'Are Union cows tasty?'
  • 'Quite tasty.'
  • 'Then take her prisoner.'
  • 'Yes sir.'

With that the Lieutenant rides out in an attempt to commandeer the cow amidst much ribaldry and cheering from both sides. It's a great moment between troops with a shared sense of humour, if different values.

Then the killing begins ...


The fight between the Andersons and the Virginia government officials who come to take their horses is one of the more light-hearted, almost slapstick sequences
The fight between the Andersons and the Virginia government officials who come to take their horses is one of the more light-hearted, almost slapstick sequences
Charlie Anderson in defiant mood
Charlie Anderson in defiant mood

In the photo above, the Andersons are recovering from a fist fight wiith men who have come to acquisition his horses for the war effort, Jacob Anderson (centre) once again takes the opportunity to tackle his father over his reluctance to get involved in the conflict:

  • 'Pa, first it was Johnson, and that was on our land. Now they come driving right into our yard. Aren't we going to do anything about it?'

Charlie nurses his bruises and says:

  • 'Well I must be getting old - seems to me we just did!'

Sam and Jennie get married, but their time together is brief
Sam and Jennie get married, but their time together is brief
Without any desire to get involved, 'Boy' finds himself on a battlefield, alongside a rebel soldier
Without any desire to get involved, 'Boy' finds himself on a battlefield, alongside a rebel soldier

ADDITIONAL ITEMS RELATING TO 'SHENANDOAH'

Scenes From Shenandoah National Park
Scenes From Shenandoah National Park

DVD - USA and Canada Musical slideshow of scenes from Shenandoah National Park

 
Shenandoah
Shenandoah

The Folk Melody MP3 - Bronn Journey instrumental

 
Shenandoah
Shenandoah

The Folk Song MP3 - Connie Dover sings 'Shenandoah'

 

FAVOURITE QUOTES

'Shenandoah', features a really fine script by James Lee Barrett, and well written dialogue is one of the key strengths of the movie. Most notably the stubbornly expressed refusal of Charlie Anderson to involve his family in the Civil War affords some great lines. Indeed the very first lines of the movie tell us all we need to know about Charlie's attitude when his doubting son Jacob arrives home with news of the encroaching armies:

  • 'They come closer every day Pa'.
  • 'They on our land?'
  • 'No sir'.
  • 'Well then it doesn't concern us, does it?'

As long as it remains that way Charlie is content. But still the war comes ever closer. A Confederate Lieutenant arrives, looking for new recruits to the background sound of gunfire, but Charlie has his own concerns:

  • 'Glad you're here Johnson. I've been meaning to have a little talk with your people about these cannon of yours. My chicken have stopped laying, the cow's dried up. Who do I send the bill to?'
  • 'Well you might try Abe Lincoln; they're mostly his. When are you going to take this war seriously Mr Anderson?'
  • 'Now let me tell you something Johnson before you get on my wrong side. My corn I take seriously because it's my corn, and my potatoes and tomatoes and fences I take note of because they're mine. But this war is not mine, and I take no note of it!'

Charlie's long dead wife had expressed the wish for the children to be brought up with Christian teaching and values. It's a kind of reluctant mission that he takes on, regularly turning up late at church on Sundays, but always making the effort to attend. Charlie's saying of 'Grace' before a family meal is a classic statement of where he feels real credit for farming the land is due:

  • 'Lord, we cleared this land. We ploughed it, sowed it and harvested. We cooked the harvest. It wouldn't be here, we wouldn't be eating it if we hadn't done it all ourselves. We worked dogbone hard for every crumb and morsel, but we thank you just the same anyway Lord for this food we're about to eat. Amen.'

Much of the rest of the dialogue is excellent, and a few other quotes are therefore sprinkled throughout this review.


The moment when Union soldiers happen upon Gabriel and 'Boy'. They set Gabriel free, but wrongly assume that 'Boy' is his master, and a Confederate soldier
The moment when Union soldiers happen upon Gabriel and 'Boy'. They set Gabriel free, but wrongly assume that 'Boy' is his master, and a Confederate soldier

SHENANDOAH - A FILM ABOUT WAR AND ABOUT FAMILY

WAR - Confederate troops line up in readiness for battle against the Union soldiers
WAR - Confederate troops line up in readiness for battle against the Union soldiers
FAMILY - Charlie Anderson journeys through a range of emotions from defiance to fatherly concern and from grief to relief
FAMILY - Charlie Anderson journeys through a range of emotions from defiance to fatherly concern and from grief to relief

WHAT'S SO GOOD ABOUT IT ?

'Shenandoah' works on many levels. It works as an indictment of the grief and suffering of war. It works as a story of America at a time of historic change. And it works as a story of family values. These various themes are all neatly brought together when Charlie has a conversation with Tom, the village doctor. He asks the doctor for his views:

  • 'Tom - what's happening? Virginia's losing isn't she?'
  • 'It looks that way Charlie.'
  • 'How do you feel about it all?'
  • 'I was born in Virginia. Lived here all my life. Raised three sons and two daughters under her flag. My oldest son Paul lies buried somewhere in Pennsylvania ... they said Gettysburg is where he fell, at a place called Little Round Top. My youngest boy came home last week with tuberculosis - he won't see another Christmas. My third son rides with General Forrest; I don't know where they are. You - you were asking me how I feel about it all. That's the only way I know how to answer you.'

The doctor cannot express his feelings. He can only relate the family tragedy of his particular war. It makes Charlie's reluctance to get involved, quite understandable. His family - like the doctor's - is now moving into the firing line. And that's what this movie shows so eloquently.

'Shenandoah' is a movie with a beautiful Virginian setting, gentle music and good dialogue, a few laughs, a poignant message, a national struggle to win a war, and a private struggle to keep a family together. The last ten minutes and two scenes - one at a grave and one in the church - are guaranteed to bring a tear to the eye of many viewers. A great film.


A 16 year old soldier lies crumpled on the ground. But he has not been shot. Rather he is distraught after acting hastily and shooting someone by mistake. Such is war.
A 16 year old soldier lies crumpled on the ground. But he has not been shot. Rather he is distraught after acting hastily and shooting someone by mistake. Such is war.
Charlie Anderson, with the next generation of the Andersons in his arms
Charlie Anderson, with the next generation of the Andersons in his arms

MY CONCLUSIONS AND MY RECOMMENDATIONS

'Shenandoah' is a film with a clever script featuring great acting from James Stewart and others. Though set in the American Civil War, this is not some gung-ho heroic war film. It's a film - just like war - in which almost everybody suffers. There is pathos in this movie. But if that sounds a bit depressing, there is also compassion, fortitude, joy and even gentle humour. Above all there is a very strong sense of family togetherness cemented through homespun philosophies, and there is a warm-heartedness of spirit. And the prevailing emotion in this film, ultimately, is positive and uplifting.

I would commend the film to all who like Westerns, historical dramas, or family dramas.

PLEASE PROVIDE YOUR ASSESSMENT OF THIS FILM

4 out of 5 stars from 4 ratings of this film

FILM RATINGS

I have introduced ratings for all my film reviews. If you have seen any of the films I have reviewed on these pages, I would appreciate the input of your opinions of the movie with a rating on the review page. Many thanks.

PHOTOS ON THIS PAGE

All screenshots are taken by the author from the movie 'Shenandoah'.


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I'D LOVE TO HEAR YOUR COMMENTS. THANKS, ALUN 15 comments

Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 3 years ago from Essex, UK Author

Thanks Alan. Glad you pick up on the realism of more recent movies in the Western genre. It is a far cry from the old days of cowboys in black hats and white hats and the cavalry chasing down the Indians and saving the day. The realism in Shenandoah is in the dilemmas and the sentiments of the characters as they face the Hell of war and its impact on normal life.

Always good to hear from you. Alun.


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 3 years ago from Essex, UK Author

cam8510; Thank you Chris. So glad you liked this film and this review of it. It is, I maintain, one of the great Westerns for the various themes and emotions it explores with sensitivity - a Western which works on many levels, and one which should be seen by everyone who enjoys movie making at its best. Appreciate your visit. Alun.


alancaster149 profile image

alancaster149 3 years ago from Forest Gate, London E7, U K (ex-pat Yorkshire)

Hello again Alun. This was the early days of realism in westerns, before the Spaghetti Westerns kicked in. There were some last rites to go through in the traditional western before the ultra-realism of films like 'A Fistful of Dollars' and 'For A Few Dollars More'. Finally 'Dances With Wolves' buried the old western for good, better or worse. Injuns were no longer Injuns but 'Native Americans' (we had a taste of that when cousin Burt took the part of Cochise, and another white US actor did Geronimo back in the 60's)


cam8510 profile image

cam8510 3 years ago from Columbus, Georgia until the end of November 2016.

I first saw this film in the theatre with my parents. That was a long time ago. Since then, I have seen all or parts of it several times. It truly made an impact on me that first time. I was only eight years old. The scenes that I remember most are when one son is killed on the farm and when a soldier was having his leg amputated. I still can hear the screams. I love this film, and I thoroughly enjoyed your review.


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 3 years ago from Essex, UK Author

Tony; my thanks for both your visit and for those very nice comments - particularly about the layout of the hub, as I always try to take a lot of time over presentation. 'Shenandoah' is certainly one of my favourite westerns / war films / family dramas depending on which ever category one chooses to put it in, with some memorable performances, scenes and dialogue.

Much appreciated. Alun.


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 3 years ago from Yorkshire

greensleeves.

Great hub, about a great film. I've seen it many times and enjoyed it.

You've done a real in depth look at this film and its characters. I thought the layout of this hub was very good too.

voted up well done.

regards Tony


alancaster149 profile image

alancaster149 4 years ago from Forest Gate, London E7, U K (ex-pat Yorkshire)

You're right, Alun. I realised it wasn't Pernell Roberts almost as soon as I'd posted my comment (typical)!

Apparently Clark Gable was in the USAAF as well. but I don't think he left Hollywood - something about him being too valuable?


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 4 years ago from Essex, UK Author

alancaster; thanks for your usual thoughtful comments.

I don't think Pernell Roberts was in 'Shenandoah'. I think the actor in question is either Patrick Wayne (son of John Wayne), or Glen Corbett, both of whom have a resemblence in some images to Roberts.

Nice to bring up the war record of James Stewart. Stewart - unlike some who only played at being heroes on the silver screen - genuinely played his part in the war, flying and commanding bombing missions - a role about which he was typically modest in later life, but a role for which he received two awards of the Distinguished Flying Cross, and an award of the Croix der Guerre. Alun.


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 4 years ago from Essex, UK Author

annart; thank you very much for your visit and your generous comment. It makes the time and effort taken to write the review seem worthwhile! I know what you mean about James Stewart; he's probably my all-time favourite actor, partly for the types of characters he usually plays, but also for that slow drawl of an accent which is so easy on the ear. Cheers. Alun.


alancaster149 profile image

alancaster149 4 years ago from Forest Gate, London E7, U K (ex-pat Yorkshire)

I remember - although not this brilliantly - seeing this back in the mists of time. I was always a fan of Colonel Stewart (I suppose you know he was in the USAAF based in England during WWII), and watched a string of Westerns over the course of time. I think I recognise Pernell Roberts, one of the 'Bonanza' cast in the line-up - am I right?


annart profile image

annart 4 years ago from SW England

Voted up, useful and interesting. This is such a good comprehensive review and well-crafted. I love James Stewart; I could listen to his voice for hours! You've given a lot of background information which adds to the interest and the value of the film. Well done.


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 4 years ago from Essex, UK Author

snakeslane; I really appreciate your comment so much, because I do take some pride in trying to make my hubs attractive to look at - in fact I probably spend almost as much time organising and reorganising capsules to avoid blank spaces etc, as I do researching information. So it's really nice to see it well received. I'm very grateful. Alun.


snakeslane profile image

snakeslane 4 years ago from Canada

Alun, This really is a perfect Hub Page. (I appreciate the in-depth film review as well.) Your use of photo capsules, graphs, highlighted text boxes, numbered lists, and variety in formatting gives the page a nice readable visual flow. Thank you for another classic Greensleeves Page! Regards, snakeslane


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Greensleeves Hubs 4 years ago from Essex, UK Author

My thanks to you teaches12345 for your visit and comment here, particularly for your appreciation of the design of the page. Cheers. I hope if you see the film again, it lives up to your memories of it! I think it will - I watched it 4 or 5 times for this review, and it's just as watchable on each viewing. Alun.


teaches12345 profile image

teaches12345 4 years ago

It has been some time since I have seen this film, but it is a great watch with a bowl of popcorn. I may have to pick this up from the local library. Great design in the post, well researched and very interesting.

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