The Characters of "Gone With The Wind" - 2


↔ THE WAR OVER - CHALLENGE IS SURVIVING IN ITS AFTERMATH ↔


Gerald O'Hara brings the news inside the ravaged Tara mansion that the war has ended. The occupants have mostly survived. All slaves are freed. The possibilities are all ahead of them! Scarlett shrewdly and quickly assesses the potential for cotton crops and prepares to swing the plantation into productive gear.

The immediate need is for a way-station for the the battered, staggering, beaten Confederate soldiers returning to the ashes of their world. Scarlett, Melanie and Mammy are in charge of operations with Suellen and Careen enlisted as aids in the program. Mammy boils lice-infested uniforms and sees that the defunct army survivors bathe while Scarlett and Melanie make sure they're fed, though Scarlett grumbles about giving their scarce food away. But Melanie reminds her that some kind northern woman may also be feeding her beloved Ashley on some forlorn northern road.

Frank Kennedy is among this defeated rabble, returning bedraggled and infested from the war, eager for permission to marry Suellen, which has become Scarlett's authority to grant, as soon as he can earn enough money to provide for her.



First Melanie gets the news that Ashley's captured so she knows he's alive.  Then they see 'another one' coming up the lane - and it's Ashley!  They run to greet each other.  Mammy must hold Scarlett back from running to him too!
First Melanie gets the news that Ashley's captured so she knows he's alive. Then they see 'another one' coming up the lane - and it's Ashley! They run to greet each other. Mammy must hold Scarlett back from running to him too!


Melanie gets word from one of the soldiers who came for refuge, about Ashley, because he'd fought with his unit and knew that he'd been captured, so she is encouraged. He is a POW, so at least - alive! Then she glimpses 'another one' coming up the road, probably hungry, and was just about to go in for a plate of food when she suddenly realizes it's Ashley; they fled as fast as they could into each other's arms while Mammy restrains Scarlett from fleeing to him, too.


Of course, once there on Tara, Ashley joins in the overall effort to provide help to the homeless war refugees in any way he can and to do his part in the plantation work. Being unaccustomed to actual chores of running a plantation or resolving its financial challenges, such as taxes, though, he feels inadequate, actually true.

Meanwhile Pork had returned from town with the news that he overheard that they were to be charged $300 for taxes on Tara, which 'might as well be a million', Scarlett said. Little wonder, when she asks Ashley for help in resolving their tax crunch, that he can offer none.

Approaching him alone in the barn, desperate and at that point, both weary and discouraged, the scene dissolves into her pleading with him to admit his love for her and run away together to Mexico. He's tempted, but of course, must refuse, being aware of Melanie and the baby and that his honor is really all he has left. Scarlett declares she has nothing left, in that case, but he picks up a handful of Tara's soil and places it in her fist, assuring her that it will sustain her.


Things Get Worse

The scene immediately shifts. Tara's former foreman-now-carpetbagger, Wilkerson, arrives at the front door in a fine horse and buggy, to present his 'new wife', the same trashy Emmie Slattery, whose care cost Mrs. O'Hara her life, now decked out in fine regalia, He's propelled by bitterness at Gerald's letting him go when Miss Ellen insisted, and presumes to have come to 'visit with old friends' and to offer to buy Tara to save it from being taxed. Scarlett seethingly tells him they're never friends, then flings the handful of its red soil, still in her clenched fist, at him, saying it's all of Tara he'll ever get.

The couple angrily get back in their wagon and leave, whereupon Gerald O'hara, who's observed all this unfold on the front steps, jumps on a horse to take off after them, but misses a jump over a fence and is tragically killed in the fall.



Scarlett & Mammy leave Rhett in jail, so out onto the Atlanta main street.
Scarlett & Mammy leave Rhett in jail, so out onto the Atlanta main street.
Frank Kennedy shows Scarlett his store.
Frank Kennedy shows Scarlett his store.
She coaxes Frank to take her to Aunt Pittypat's & manages to steal him from Suellen & marry him so she can pay the Tara taxes.
She coaxes Frank to take her to Aunt Pittypat's & manages to steal him from Suellen & marry him so she can pay the Tara taxes.

Postwar Trials With Tara: Her Solution: Husband #2

Alone and faced with taxes she can't pay, Scarlett purposes to go to Atlanta to beseech Rhett for money for taxes. She has Mammy make her an elegant outfit from green velvet curtains. Rhett is in jail and has no access to his money which is in a bank in England, so must refuse her, even after letting her make a fool of herself coyly asking him.

Angered, she stomps out with Mammy onto the street, where they run into Frank Kennedy and discover that Frank has, indeed, established a thriving dry-goods store. He assures her he has almost enough saved to marry Suellen and build them a house. She sees he has a small lumberyard and calculates how profitable it could be, with Atlanta's rebuilding business booming.


Of course, she sees all this as her opportunity to get the money for the taxes so she seduces Frank into marryng her, lying that Suellen just got tired of waiting for him and married someone else, as Mammy glares at her for telling such a cruel lie. But she gets the money to pay the taxes and then takes charge of the store, running everything rigidly.




Much to Frank's chagrin, Scarlett pressures his friends to pay past-due money and she expands the store into a major lumber business, which she persuades Ashley to help her run. When she approves Johnnie Gallagher's cruel use of half-starved prisoners to work it, both Frank and Ashley are aghast. She, however, is unrelenting in her pursuit of success, money and security at any cost to others.


↔ SCARLETT's FIASCO ↔

Rhett cautions Scarlett to not go alone out on the deserted road to the work camp, which she sassily tosses off, leaving him muttering, "What a woman!"
Rhett cautions Scarlett to not go alone out on the deserted road to the work camp, which she sassily tosses off, leaving him muttering, "What a woman!"
Scarlett's attack and escape
Scarlett's attack and escape

She tells Rhett, 'I can shoot straight if I don't have to shoot too far," and he's amused. But after ignoring his warnings, she is savagely attacked by a nest of rabble, fights back but passes out & is about to be violated. Miraculously, she's rescued by Big Sam, former trusted Tara slave, who is camping nearby and heard her screams for help.

Big Sam fights off the hoodlums while she escapes. He catches up with her to drives her home to safety.

While the men are going to clean out the camp of hoodlums, the women sew to appear normal.
While the men are going to clean out the camp of hoodlums, the women sew to appear normal.
Rhett brings wounded Ashley home, with all the men pretending to be drunk.
Rhett brings wounded Ashley home, with all the men pretending to be drunk.

The Political Situation Erupts

That evening, the menfolks head out to 'clean up' the camp of drifters responsible for the attack, taking matters in their own hands without consulting the occupying Yankee Union military. The tense women keep up appearances of normalcy, but exclude Scarlett from awareness. India almost blurts it out in her fury toward Scarlett for causing it, but Melanie shushes her, defending Scarlett.

When Rhett comes in asking where the men are, India advises Melanie to not trust him, but she reads his face and tells him where they are before he rushes to go see about them.

Meanwhile, Yankee troops, led by Captain Tom, come to investigate the men's self-governing activities. He posts men outside Melanie's house to snare the men upon their return, while inside the ladies nervously sew and Melanie reads classics aloud to them

Rhett, Dr. Meade and Ashley arrive, pretending to be sloppy drunk in order to disguise Ashley's serious wounds and support him between them. Melanie goes along with the sham as though Ashley's coming home drunk with his friends is a common occurence, while brushing aside Captain Tom's objections.

Rhett Saves the Day

Rhett provides Captain Tom with a plausible alibi, vouching that the men were with him at Belle Watling's 'men's club', assuring him that Belle will back him up. He manages to get Tom to accept it by reminding him of his own forays into Belle's place and shaming him in front of the womenfolk, who act properly miffed by their husband's outrageous behavior. Captain Tom apologetically retreats, and immediately Dr. Meade begins to treat Ashley's wounds. Scarlett's concern with Ashley prompts Rhett to remind her that she should ask about her own husband, Frank, who was killed in the ambush protecting her honor.

Repetitive Widowhood

So once again, Scarlett is a widow wearing black, feeling sorry for herself and drinking privately. Rhett comes by, finds her in that state and warns her not to drink alone, that "people will always find out." But he'd come to declare his love and propose, while reminding her that he has to catch her between husbands.

After an initial surprise and a 'show' of objections, she enthusiastically accepts, especially when he assures her she can have as big and gaudy a diamond ring as she wants.


A Rocky Third Marriage to Rhett Begins

He will provide her lavishly with everything her heart's desires, which delights her, though she still thinks she loves Ashley and will be unable to love Rhett the same way. She explains to Rhett that they're compatible and he admits that is their best feature. With Ashley unavailable to her, she's too greedy to refuse Rhett's proposal and all he promises her and it starts off well.


The Honeymoon

Her experience of deprivation allows her to indulge in the abundance he provides. Their New Orleans lavish honeymoon has her shamelessly greedily gobbling the fine cuisine. But even on the honeymoon, Rhett must comfort her nightmares from her experiences, when she begs him to take her home to Atlanta, where he builds her a fine mansion and even restores Tara to even greater splendor than before the war. She's living in luxury.


Scarlett & Rhett push Bonnie down the street, speaking cordially with all the society grand dames, inspiring them to vie to invite her to their grandchildren's parties.
Scarlett & Rhett push Bonnie down the street, speaking cordially with all the society grand dames, inspiring them to vie to invite her to their grandchildren's parties.

Bonnie Blue Butler

They have a beautiful baby girl, Bonnie Blue, on whom Rhett dotes. As soon as possible, he buys her a pony and teaches her to ride. He buys her a lovely lady-like riding outfit, but it's skirted, so that it becomes necessary for her to learn to ride side-saddle, becaise her dress is unbecomingly arranged while she straddles the saddle! Rhett is determined that Bonnie will be well accepted into Atlanta society, so everything must be just 'so'.

Rhett and Bonnie Blue Butler

At her dressing table, Scarlett caresses a picture of Ashley.
At her dressing table, Scarlett caresses a picture of Ashley.
Rhett came up behind her; discovers it after she announces she wants no more babies.
Rhett came up behind her; discovers it after she announces she wants no more babies.

Shadows Gather

Jealousy rears its head, though when Scarlett announces that she want to have no more children (really because it's ruining her figure). Being before contraception was known, she mentions that Melanie can't have more babies and that Ashley respects that, clearly implying abstinence. She drops Ashley's picture she'd been mooning over. Of course, Rhett is furious.




When she begins to shut Rhett out of her bedroom, the way is paved for new jealousy and an "Ashley" cloud which hovers and paves the way for the next incident.

Incriminating Scene


Scarlett and Ashley are talking at the lumber store about his birthday to be celebrated that night by Melanie's surprise party, of which he's aware but will be 'surprised'. They platonically embrace, only to be observed by India Wilkes and several of the society matrons who instantly misjudge it as intimacy.


There's no explaining, so Scarlett plans to avoid the birthday party, but Rhett insists that she must go and face the woman she's wronged. He chooses the most dramatic of her red dresses which she must wear, with 'plenty of rouge'. Then he tells her she'll have to face it alone.


Ashley's Birthday Party


Scarlett enters the party, expecting the worst. Everyone stops in their tracks and glares at her. She's unnerved but stands tall and straight-faced, appearing confident.




But Melanie, even though she's been informed of the earlier incident, trusts both Ashley and Scarlett and she immediately becomes Scarlett's protector, greeting her warmly, asking her to help with the guests and making it impossible for the guests to scorn her.


Confrontation

Afterward, Scarlett and Rhett chance to meet in the dining room, each there to drink, where they argue heatedly. He's been drinking quite awhile and threatens her, almost intimidating her. But she rallies and sets him straight, then leaves with aplomb and starts back upstairs.

Rhett tells Scarlett he could crack her head like a walnut.  But she  quickly recovers and shakes him off, telling him she's not cornered & he'll never corner her.
Rhett tells Scarlett he could crack her head like a walnut. But she quickly recovers and shakes him off, telling him she's not cornered & he'll never corner her.


He storms out of the room and follows her to the stairs sweeping her up in his arms and carrying her upstairs, telling her it's one time she won't shut him out.


The next morning scene finds Scarlett waking up happy, smiling and feeling great, but it is short-lived. When Rhett enters the room, she's still glowing, thinking things are resolved, but he brings different news. After apologizing for his drunken behavior the night before, he says they should get a divorce. She tries to tell him her feelings, but he's adamant, and announces he's leaving right away for London and taking Bonnie with him.



London & Return to Atlanta

At first Bonnie enjoys London but she's afraid, cries in her sleep and misses her momma.

When she begs Rhett to take her home, he does. She's thrilled to see Scarlett and Scarlett is hopeful that Rhett is glad to see her, too.


Bonnie is happy to see her mother, but when Rhett sees Scarlet at the top of the stairs, smiling at him, he's snide and insulting, saying that even a bad mother is better than none to Bonnie. Of course her smile fades.

She tells him she is pregnant, to which he's sarcastic, asking who's the father and saying maybe she'll lose the baby.


In her frustration and panic, she tumbles down the stairs and suffers a miscarriage. Rhett is devastated and, though Scarlett repeatedly asked for him in her delirium, when he asks those attending her whether she asked for him, no one reports it to him. It's a tense household, though Melanie tries to assure him that Scarlett loves him.


Just Before Scarlett's Disastrous Fall

Bonnie's Disastrous Fall

When Scarlett has begun to recover, they're watching Bonnie, who wants to show them her jumping forsemanship, adamantly refuses to wait when they caution her. and,- like her grandfather O'Hara, attempts to jump a fence, falls and is killed.

Rhett is inconsolable, locks himself in the room with his daughter's body, refusing for her be buried, because she's so scared of the dark. Mammy finally must ask Melanie to come reason with him,- successfully.

But devastation is palatable, and Melanie collapses outside his door.


Major Conclusions

Final Blows Spare Some Lives, End The Marriage and The Film


Melanie dies in childbirth, which medically was ill-advised and was further hastened by her effort to reason with Rhett to allow Bonnie to be buried.

At her dying bedside, she particularly asked for Scarlett, especially to care for little Beau, her son. She also asked her to care for Ashley, as she once cared for her at his request.

When Scarlett tell Ashley and sees It dawns on her that she really never loved him in a mature way and that she really does love Rhett. But the abiding jealousy again comes forward when Rhett asks for but misinterprets Scarlett's brief report to him about what Melanie said to her at her bedside. Rhett sees this permission as exactly what Scarlett has longed for all her life. Nothing she can say or do convinces him otherwise. He leaves her, answering her plea what will she do without him with the famous (then unheard of language in a film): "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn" as he walks away into the fog. The movie ends with Scarlett sitting in a heap on her massive staircase, trying to think what she will do, but, as usual, deciding she can't think about it then, but will "think about it tomorrow".

But she perks up as the idea of going back to Tara, which Rhett had fully restored for her, takes shape in her mind, and a resolve emerges with her last words in the film, "I'll think of some way to get him back! After all, tomorrow IS another day!"


Frankly, my dear. . . (it's too late . . . )

Characters of GWTW

With which of these character(s) do you most identify?

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Comments 22 comments

MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 3 years ago from South Africa

Such a sad ending, thoroughly deserved by Scarlet. What I like the most, is the positive side of this sadness: Hope. Ending fiction with this combination always works.

I am now very eager to watch Gone With The Wind again. Thank you, Nellieanna, for this fabulous review.

(((xxxx)))


Dreamlin profile image

Dreamlin 3 years ago from New Jersey, USA

Enjoy this movie very much and watch it every year. It’s a rich and memorable tale of love, sacrifice, and hope. I like the character Scarlett O'Hara the most, though she is far from being perfect. She has strength in her that even though she is in the direst situation somehow she finds a solution no matter how disagreeable it may seem at the time. She is a survivor and most importantly she never gives up. Thanks for this great hub.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Dear Martie - It is sad. I always wish I could grab him for her and haul him back inside for more of her punishment! - or maybe she's really straightened up. What's saddest was that when she did call for him in her delirium & he wanted her to so much, he never knew, just as he didn't realize that she'd really gotten over her Ashley infatuation at the end. All along, whenever she was really ready to go to him, he was 'off' her, & vice-versa. Like he said when she was pleading with him not to go while he was packing, it just seemed that they were always at odds. Timing was always off for them. But so long as she insisted on being 'in love' with Ashley, Rhett couldn't take that & she couldn't think about what she was losing. What a waste! Much about relationships to be learned from that movie.

There was a sequel written but I thought it was no good. GWTW stands as it is. Good thing they've repaired & digitalized it now so it's more permanent. All the people in it are now dead and gone, yet generation after generation has seen it. Isn't that amazing?

Thanks for continuing to read Part 2. I hope you get to watch the film again soon! I believe there are several folks who've now been prompted to watch it again, just hearing me talk about working on the project. I'm almost sad it's done and over. haha.

Hugs -


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Dear Dreamlin - thank you for your astute comments about Scarlett. She has many facets, and her strength & determination are among them, high-up! She's like the women in my family in that respect. She's a problem-solver, too. In today's world, she might have become an engineer or people-manager. Even so, her focus is often mostly in her own self-interest in those activities. Human-being, in other words.

I just popped over to visit your hubsite and I see many great-looking hubs I'll plan to read! Thank you for the visit to mine!

ps - hope you'll drop by the Part 1 of this GWTW feature!


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida

What a great synopsis, Nellieanna, of an unforgettable film. Now you have convinced me I must watch this movie again in its entirety. That won't be hard to do since it is shown regularly on some of my cable TV stations. Don't know how I missed your Part One but will remedy that forthwith. Happy, Healthy New Year to you, m'dear.


always exploring profile image

always exploring 3 years ago from Southern Illinois

What a wonderful review of the ending of the greatest movie of all times. I read that Bonnie Blue died in 2010 at the age of 76. I have always wondered why Margaret Mitchell didn't write another book. I really liked this. I wish you could see my computer room wall. I have four pictures of Rhett and Scarlett. I now have the urge to watch this movie again. I can hear my son saying, " Not again Mother. " lol..Thank you for an outstanding review..Cheers..


Mr Archer profile image

Mr Archer 3 years ago from Missouri

Simply outstanding work, Ma'am. Very well done.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Dear Dr. BJ - Thank you! I hope you do - both read the Part 1 of this synopsis and see the movie again! I finally gave up waiting for it to come around and got my own DVD copy of it! Who would have ever thought it would be available in our own living rooms when we first saw it in a movie theater? From that time in 1939 till now, 74 years later, represents so many changes in our world! It takes my breath away.

I wish you the best of New Years too, my dear! I'm ready for it! Hugs.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Ruby, thank you. That surely was the most dramatic ending of all time! From the first time I saw it till the last time, I'm always wishing he'd just turn back and believe her! But at least she didn't totally give up, so maybe . . . just maybe. . . it worked out eventually. ( or . . .maybe Margaret Mitchell just didn't know how she could let him step back into it, even in a sequel, - suppose?)


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Mr. Archer, again - I thank you for continuing the 'rest of the story' with me here.


arb profile image

arb 3 years ago from oregon

Hello butterfly! What an enormous undertaking and I suspect, labor of love. It is indeed, a sweeping epic depicting history and relationships. I'm sure if given the opportunity, many would rewrite the ending, however, the one chosen, is an illustration of life's reality and the consequences it imposes on the decisions we make. We do reap what we sow. Given the era and circumstances which confronted people during those times, it is difficult to know our own responses. We are prone to think that we would do the right and noble thing, but, in our weakest hour, we are revealed.

A grand undertaking, taken by a grand lady who I suspect, would have survived the time in grand fashion.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Hello, Alan, good to see you online! Hope your holiday has been everything good and that 2013 will be, too!!

Thank you for visiting this epic - definitely a sweeping one. Thank you for your keen perception of my intent in writing it. Yes, it has been a labor of love, with a generous sense of awe, horror, affection, hope and need-to learn from it. Just another report on a great movie wasn't my objective.

My attention has been grabbed by the sameness of human behavior, in no matter what circumstances; and - as you so accurately point out - how each type tends to reap whatever is sown precisely at moments of their choices setting up a course of consequences.

So, much as I might regret her results & wish Scarlett would've behaved so that Rhett could just love her as he felt & wanted to, her nature is to go on exploiting kindness & valiantly responding to dire need, according to her character. Meanwhile he'd ultimately be forced to give it up surely. He's not built for endless mistreatment. Neither character demonstrated being built for restraint and good timing!

Perhaps rigid consequences are firmly affixed to pages of a book or scenes of a film, and perhaps in real life lessons are more forgiving & can be absorbed from experience well enough for changes to be made which will upgrade probable consequences. Life offers more layers than a writer's imagination & logic can, - hopefully. But unless changes do occur, - well, as they say in modern parlance: 'If one keeps doing the same things, one will keep getting the same results!'

New Years is a great time to give that idea consideration! :-)

Thank you, my friend. Surviving the undertaking describes the feeling! Methinks you know me well. (I'm just glad it didn't bomb!)

ps - this is the 2nd part of the 2-part hub.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 3 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

Beautifully and magnificently done, my friend. I couldn't have expected any less from you but this was superb.

Now when I've finished reading 'Life of Pi', I bet you can't know what I am going to read,

That's right.

And I'm going to drag out my GWTW DVD and revel in it.

Thank you again fro a lovely and charming critique, as only you seem to be able to weave them


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Ah, Ian! How gratifying! Thank you, m'dear. Your approval is much treasured!

How nice that you're going to watch it; and you mentioned that you have the book downloaded on Kindle, too! I'm not sure I'd be up to reading it again. But I've been wondering whatever happened to my original copy I read to shreds as a teenager. It must have been at my parents' house but I didn't see it when we were sorting through things. Ah, well. Perhaps some other relative wanted to read it along the years.


sligobay profile image

sligobay 3 years ago from east of the equator

Hello Nellieanna and best wishes again for a happy, healthy and joyous New Year. This has been a simply spectacular two-part review of Gone with the Wind. I, too, must watch the film again in its entirety. I cannot imagine the grief experienced by Rhett at the loss of his darling daughter.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Dear Gerry - I'm so pleased that you enjoyed the parts, although, - yes - it is so sad for Rhett. He loved his little Bonnie so much. Scarlett loved her, too, of course, but not with his intensity. Hope you do get a chance to see the movie again. Thanks so much for stopping by and hope your new year will be good too!


Genna East profile image

Genna East 3 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

Your superb review complements the wonderful photographs as ‘Gone With The Wind’ comes flooding back. It is like watching a silent film. I was intrigued by your question: With which of these character(s) do you most identify? As a woman, I think there’s a little Scarlett, Melanie, and Belle in all of us. I identify with Scarlett’s spirit, but there’s also some Melanie tucked inside. I am now eager to watch this magnificent epic again. Thank you, Nellieanna, for taking us on this wonderful journey.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

Genna - how true! We gals are more usually mixtures of the types, sometimes more one or the other. I really appreciate your answering the question so well! It was like seeing it silently to write it, in fact. I'm glad you enjoyed it too! Thank you.


marcoujor profile image

marcoujor 3 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

Dear Nellieanna,

I can think of no other Hubber...actually woman besides my Momma who could have done justice to this character review as you, my darling.

I have never considered my combined characteristics of Scarlett AND Melanie, AND come to think of it...even Belle until reading your summarization and the insightful comments.

Thank you for the attention, detail and love you put into these two epic pieces. I know you could produce nothing less, yet it is most evident and makes for a magical read. Voted UP and UABI. Love, Maria


arb profile image

arb 3 years ago from oregon

Hi butterfly! Of course I did read part 1 first. I read part 2 after part 1 and then commented. How silly of me to not have indicated so. It is a tribute to your skill that my interest took me immediately to part 2 without stopping.


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

You're so kind, Maria. How I'd like to have known your Momma. She had to have been an outstanding woman to have a daughter like you!

I am partial to the mixture of characteristics. Not ALL one. It has been a most satisfying project! I'm so pleased that you like it!


Nellieanna profile image

Nellieanna 3 years ago from TEXAS Author

I usually wouldn't have mentioned whether or not anyone had followed 'the yellow brick road' in perusing a sequence as I intended. My feeling is that folks do it the way they prefer and that's always what's best. It's a little like, "if I have to ask . . . ", it means it's less spontaneous, and I value spontaneity.

So I'm still a bit embarrassed that I mentioned it to you - and, sure enough - mistakenly, since you'd read it in proper order!

I'm enjoying and flattered that you just felt like going straight from part 1 to part 2 without stopping. Thank you, dear Alan!

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