The Descendants & J. Edgar...Two new movie reviews by Robwrite

THE DESCENDANTS (4 stars out of 5)

Now that we've gotten passed the fall malaise which comes between the summer blockbusters and the late-year oscar-calibre films (which are released at the end of the year to be eligible to win an oscar next spring), we've got the first likely oscar nominee for the next academy awards. The Descendants is a great beginning to the oscar season, with a great lead performance by George Clooney.

Director Alexander Payne, who made About Schmidt and Sideways (both of which were excellent) gives us another thoughtful film about a lost man with a crushed spirit who goes on a journey after reaching an emotional crisis. George Clooney gives his best performance since the superb Up In the Air, as a man struggling through a personal upheaval.

The story follows successful Hawaiian lawyer Matt King, whose great-grandmother was the last surviving female descendant of King Kamayamayha, and so, Matt's family has long owned a huge chunk of ancestral property. However, new laws will strip the King clan of their lands in the next few years, so Matt--the executor of the land--has the responsibilty of negotiating a sale which will make not only himself but also some of his struggling relatives filthy rich. The clan (Including Beau Bridges in a small role) keeps pestering him about the deal.

However, Matt's mind is not on the deal since his wife Elisabeth (Patricia Hasie) has recently been hurt in a boating accident and is an irreversible coma from which she will never recover. Matt is informed that her living will demands that they must pull the plug on her. On top of all that drama, Matt now finds himself a single father of two troubled daughters, 17 year-old Alexandra (Shailene Woodley) and 10 year-old Scottie (Amara Miller). Alexandra is a recovering drug addict and Scottie is constantly getting into trouble in school.

Just when you think Matt has all he can handle on his plate, Alexandra drops another bomb on him...His wife was having an affair and was planning to leave him for another man. Matt doesn't know how to deal with the anger of this infidelity since his wife is on her deathbed. Can he forgive her before she dies? In order to sort out his feelings, he and the kids take a trip to find the 'other man', hoping that a confrontation will give Matt some closure.

Clooney brings a sad vulnerability to the character of Matt, who only starts to realize how uninspired and tepid his life has been when it starts to fall apart. He doesn't know how to relate to his daughters and starts to realize at the 11th hour how much the traditional family land he is selling means to him. He gives a nicely nuanced performance, mixing comedy and angst.

Woodley gives a nice supporting performance as Alexandra, the spoiled bratty teen daughter who can't forgive her mother for cheating on her father. Her character slowly changes during the film. Matthew Lillard plays the 'other man' Brian Speer, and actually resists the temptation to go over-the-top for a change. He doesn't have the screen charisma to match Clooney but he is perfectly adequate in his limited screen time.

Director Payne manages to keep the serious subject matter from being dragged into melodrama, by injecting many light-hearted moments. There are some scenes of rather broad, sitcomish comedy which sometimes seems a bit misplaced (such as when Elisibeth's elderly father punches Alexandra's young boyfriend in the face) but they don't spoil the film. Nick Kraouse, as Alexandra's stoner boyfriend Sid, doesn't really have much purpose here except to be comedy relief, although he gets less cliched as the film progresses.

The film moves at a very casual pace. The whole story could probably be told in a one-hour TV show, including commercials, but the plot meanders along unhurriedly for nearly two hours, allowing us time to get to know our characters and see what makes them tick. There is a lot of heart and warmth in the Descendants, and don't be surprised if Clooney gets a best actor nod.

Highly recommended.

J. EDGAR (3 stars out of 5)

Clint Eastwood is one of our best living filmmakers. He's given us such magnificent modern movies as Unforgiven, Mystic River, Million Dollar Baby, Letters from Iwo Jima and Gran Torino. He has a superb way of getting to the heart of American tragedy and delivering intense and engrossing dramas. His latest film, J. Edgar, is far from his best work, which is a bit disappointing since his subject is one of the most infamous and controversial men of the 20th century. There are high expectations for this one that are not fully met. Still, there is a lot here which is worth seeing, even if it isn't on par with Eastwood's usual high standards.

Leonardo DiCaprio--a consistently fine actor--portrays the notorious John Edgar Hoover, who rose up from being a low-level member of the justice Department in World War One, to become the head of the FBI, where he would lurk behind the scenes as the most feared man in the U.S. government for 50 years.

The film jumps around in time Citizen Kane style, (Or Pulp Fiction style, for you young fans) as Eastwood parallels events at different points in Hoover's life for dramatic irony. The screenplay covers Hoover's whole life, from childhood till his death in 1972, which is a daunting task for any film, even a two-hour and twenty minute flick like this one.

We follow Hoover's quick rise to the top, as he uses anti-communist fear to propel himself into the limelight. We then see some of the highlights of his career, such as the Lindbergh baby kidnapping case, about which Hoover later exaggerates his participation in the case; something he would do for most of his life. He loved to take credit, even if he didn't deserve it. For instance, when Hoover becomes jealous of his subordinate agent Purvis, who captured gangster John Dillenger, Hoover has Purvis shipped off to a quiet desk somewhere so Hoover can take all the credit. Hoover's jingoistic zeal, combined with his natural paranoia and need to be seen as a hero, all combine into his ill-concieved decision that he needs to keep detailed records of everyone--in the government and out--so he can destroy anyone if necessary. For the good of the country, of course. HIs secret dossiers would be the bane of many people, from Elenor Roosevelt, to Martin Luther King. (Amusingly, Hoover becomes indimidated by Richard Nixon because Nixon is ruthless enough to beat him at his own game.)

Much of the script focuses on the three main relationships in Hoover's life. His religious, dominating mother (Judy Dench), his long-time secretary/gal Friday Helen Gandy (Naomi Watts) and Hoover's secret love Clyde Tolson (Armie Hammer).

Mother Hoover is seen as the guiding force in his life; the motivation and inspiration for everything he was to become. She is his personal wise-women, who advices him every step of the way up the ladder, with political savvy, yet the holy fanaticism of the mother in Carrie.

Naomi Watts as Gandy starts off as a possible love interest for a socially inept Hoover, who tries to impress her by showing off his new card filing system, but she has no interest in him that way, nor does he actually think of her sexually. She quickly sees through his sham of looking for a wife who would be there for appearance sake, because Hoover's claim that he "doesn't like to dance with girls" means a lot more than dancing. Hammer plays Tolson, a handsome young agent recruited by Hoover to be part of his staff, despite a lack of qualifications. Their in-the-closet relationship would remain covert for their entire lives. (There is one cross-dressing scene as well, since Hoover was rumored to wear women's clothing sometimes, although this isn't a proven fact.)

There is a bit of a claustrophobic feel to the movie, since much of it takes place in shadowy back-rooms where Hoover plots and plans. The framing device of Hoover dictating his life story to a young agent is a bit of a cliche, but it works well enough here, given Hoover's massive ego.

DiCaprio does a fine job as Hoover, despite being handicapped by some of the worst old-age make-up since Little Big Man (although Hammer's make-up is far worse.) This isn't DiCaprio's first bio-pic, because he already played Howard Hughs in the Aviator, which was a superior film to this one. DiCaprio is one of the most reliable actors working today, and seldom gives a bad performance.

A number of simulacrums of famous celebrities and political figures of the 20th century appear throughout the film, (Shirley Temple, Ginger Rogers and several Presidents)most notably Jeffery Donovan (Burn Notice) as Bobby Kennedy, who engages in a psychological chess game with Hoover.

The biggest flaw of the film is that it has no real center. It tries to tell us the whole life story of J. Edgar Hoover but there is too much to tell regarding Hoovers' 50 year career to be told well in such a short time, so the movie just seems like a Cliff-Notes version of his life. The film would have been better if it had focused on one aspect of Hoover or one period of his life. Eastwood seems to point to Hoover's Oedipal complex for his mother as the reason for him becoming the man he became, but that seems too simplistic, and it makes Hoover seem less interesting.

J. Edgar isn't a bad film but given the pedigree of Eastwood and DiCaprio, and what a great subject they had to work with, you can't help but expect more than this You'll be hoping for an insightful look at the fascinating mind of a notorious individual, but instead you'll get an overly simplified explanation for 50 years worth of machinations. This could have been much better. J. Edgar is well-made but it just misses the mark.

Moderately recommended.

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Comments 20 comments

Cogerson profile image

Cogerson 4 years ago from Virginia

Very nicely done....going into the reviews....I am not a Clooney fan and I am a huge Clint fan. So now that we have that out of the way...it looks like Clooney's Descendants will be getting lots of Oscar talk for the next two months...your high recommendation matches the national average of 92%....so I will see this movie but many months for now....as I will wait until DVD to watch this movie that sounds pretty good....although I must admit reading that Matthew Lillard is the other man does not seem possible....but maybe he has matured since his Scooby Doo days.

As for J. Edgar...this movies seems like a great match between Leo and Clint...sorry to see it only rated a little better than average in your review....I did like you line about Citizen Kane timeline or Pulp Fiction to the younger readers...very funny but very true. It sounds like the makeup is a huge problem for the movie as well....what was Clint thinking about....and how did they not hire top makeup artists. Based on the lukewarm review I think we will keep on $50 in our pocket and wait for DVD as well...voted up and useful....and I am going to attach this review to my Top Films of 2011 hub....which joined your Indian hub in the 10,000 hit club.


Robwrite profile image

Robwrite 4 years ago from Bay Ridge Brooklyn NY Author

Hi Cogerson; Congratulations on the 10,000 hit hub. And thanks for the link.

If you're not a Clooney fan, I can see why you'd rather wait until the Descendants DVD comes out. I'd recommend seeing it before the Oscars come out. They may wait until after the oscars (if it gets nominated) to release it because a win will certainy increase its sales.

As for J. Edgar, it has its points but its not vintage Eastwood. I don't know why they didn't find a better make-up artist to do the aging effects.

Thanks for the comments, as always,

Rob


FloraBreenRobison profile image

FloraBreenRobison 4 years ago

These both sound like films I would enjoy watching. I like Clooney films (not the Oceans films) and love learning about the FBI, so I can see me watching both films. I don't know that I will get to see them both on the big screen, however. I am in full rehearsal mode right now.


Robwrite profile image

Robwrite 4 years ago from Bay Ridge Brooklyn NY Author

Hi Flora; Don't ruin your rehearsal mode when your in the zone. The movies will wait. I hope you enjoy them when you see them. The Descendants is better. I've always liked Clooney (I agree with you that that the Oceans 11 films are his worst work...Well, except for "Batman and Robin")

Thanks for reading,

Rob


Paradise7 profile image

Paradise7 4 years ago from Upstate New York

Good reviews. Very in-depth. Judging from these reviews, I'd like to see the Decendants movie, but not the J. Edgar Hoover movie. I think maybe Clint was trying for film noir, by the sounds of it, and missed by inches.


Robwrite profile image

Robwrite 4 years ago from Bay Ridge Brooklyn NY Author

Hi Paradise; The 'Descendants' is definitely the one I would recommend. As for 'J. Edgar', I think Eastwood was trying too hard to create something artful, like 'Citizen Kane', but it didn't quite come together.

Thanks for reading,

Rob


Jools99 profile image

Jools99 4 years ago from North-East UK

Rob, Good hub. I may go to see The Descendants at the cinema but J Edgar wouldn't have been on my 'must see' list. I think Clooney was very good in Up In The Air and O Brother Where Art Thou and he doesn't get enough opportunity to stretch himself so The Descendants sounds like his chance again. Voted up.


Robwrite profile image

Robwrite 4 years ago from Bay Ridge Brooklyn NY Author

Hi Jools; Clooney has given some very good performances (Not including his phoned-in "Oceans" films), and I think he's a very talented actor. "Up in the Air" was probably his career best but he's very good in this, too. It's definitely worth seeing.

'J. Edgar' is a decent but unexceptional film that you may want to catch on cable or DVd some time.

Thanks for commenting,

Rob


Hello, hello, profile image

Hello, hello, 4 years ago from London, UK

A well written hub especially you had to cope with a lot of material as well pointing out the problems with the film. It is also said that Hoover was behind JFK's murder because he was on the verge of cracking the mafia which Hoover were in their pockets and brought him down. Furthermore, he suposed to have a relationship with Johnson. It could make sense because Johnson was there and then to be sworn in. What always buffles me is how these either dirty and/or some complete inadequate charaters come to power? Who is really behind them pulling the strings?


Robwrite profile image

Robwrite 4 years ago from Bay Ridge Brooklyn NY Author

Hi H.H.; there are a million conspiracy theories concerning the Kennedy assassination, and I'm glad Eastwood didn't get bogged down in all that.

Politics is full of backroom deals, blackmail, hidden agendas and double-crossing. No wonder the people who make it to the top are the most ruthless.

Thanks for reading,

Rob


mewlhouse profile image

mewlhouse 4 years ago from Louisville

Hard as it is for me to admit I liked the Eastwood film better (as I am definitely NOT a Clint Eastwood fan) I will have to bite the bullet and do it. I love Alexander Payne movies when they are of the quality of About Schmidt and Sideways, but this film failed miserably for me. I was so disappointed. I wrote my own review of it here if you are interested in reading it. There were a couple things I did like, so it isn't all negative.

http://hubpages.com/entertainment/Alexander-Payne-...


Robwrite profile image

Robwrite 4 years ago from Bay Ridge Brooklyn NY Author

Hi mewhouse; Well, no film pleases everyone. I thought it was excellent but I know everyone won't agree. I'm also a big Eastwood fan, although I was disappointed in "J. Edgar".

Thanks for reading,

Rob


Xenonlit profile image

Xenonlit 4 years ago

You have a true gift for writing film reviews. I will definitely see the Clooney film because I adore George Clooney, plus, you gave a great insight into the work.


Robwrite profile image

Robwrite 4 years ago from Bay Ridge Brooklyn NY Author

Thank you, Xenonlit. I appreciate that. I hope you enjoy the film. It's getting great overall reviews.

Rob


mewlhouse profile image

mewlhouse 4 years ago from Louisville

I would be interested in your take of an "excellent" movie, say, Man in the Wilderness starring Richard Harris. The acting of all the characters is far superior to the acting in The Descendants. In no way is George Clooney the quality actor that Richard Harris was. And I am not attacking George Clooney. Nice fellow. But we, as critics and viewers of present day films, have lowered our standards substantially if we think George Clooney's role is Oscar material. And it is a crying shame. Compare the two actors side by side and then tell me it is only my opinion. It is clear as day.


Robwrite profile image

Robwrite 4 years ago from Bay Ridge Brooklyn NY Author

Mewhouse; I respect your opinion. Richard Harris was a very good actor and he made a lot of good films but I do think "Man in the Wilderness" was a very different type of movie, and not oscar calibre. Harrowing and engrossing in a bloody and violent way but nothing too special.

There are still plenty of good performers today. Look at Colin Firth in last years, "the King's Speech" or Helen Miren in 'the Queen'.

But I don't like to compare performers. That isn't really fair. I mean, I wouldn't say, for instance, Christian Bale didn't deserve his oscar last year because he's not as good as Jimmy Stewart, or that Natalie Portman doesn't deserve one because she's not Katherine Hepburn. If someone does a good job, I give them credit, whatever their body of work was. And Clooney has given some good performances, like in "Up in the Air".


mewlhouse profile image

mewlhouse 4 years ago from Louisville

Agreed, I think Colin Firth is definitely Oscar worthy. I do not think Clooney is, however. Nor the vehicle he came in with. I was not suggesting Man in the Wilderness was Oscar caliber, just an example of a film far superior to the mediocre Descendants. Thank you for allowing me to speak.


epigramman profile image

epigramman 4 years ago

..well hello Sir Rob of Write - these movies aren't out yet are they? lol lol - I'm still renting dvds at the local video store - lol lol - saw a good film tonight though - THE DEBT, a spy/espionage thriller starring Dame Helen Mirren - splendid I thought, and a no-nonsense film all the way - I even cried at the end - do you cry at the movies Rob? I even cried last night watching an old Steve Martin film classic called LA STORY - perhaps I am a sucky baby - lol - of course I am in touch with my feelings and I just might be the number one film buff at the Hub - lol lol - sorry Flora and Cogerson - lol - lake erie time 11:09pm .... always love your passion Rob and your enthusiasm for what you do - and that, sincerely, puts you on a world class platform in my opinion - then again Cogerson and Flora are both world class too!


Robwrite profile image

Robwrite 4 years ago from Bay Ridge Brooklyn NY Author

Hi Epi; My local video/DVD store closed down so I'm thinking of getting Netflicks. I haven't seen "the Debt" but I've heard some good things about it and Helen Mirren is always worth watching. I've been a fan of hers since "Excalibre".

I haven't cried at a movie in a long time but I used to. "Old yeller" always got me. I could never get through the end of that one without balling like a baby.

I think I'M the biggest film buff on Hub pages. Who else would spend months doing a 300 greatest films list?

Thanks, as always, for the kind words.

Rob


epigramman profile image

epigramman 4 years ago

...well Sir Rob you're right and you've got a good point there ....... lake erie time 12:34pm

.....and you're very very good at what you do.

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