The Monkees ... The Heart Of Rock & Roll

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Billboard 200: #1  --5× Platinum
Billboard 200: #1 --5× Platinum

The Monkees, 1966

  1. "(Theme from) The Monkees" - 2:18
  2. "Saturday's Child" (David Gates) - 2:43
  3. "I Wanna Be Free" - 2:24
  4. "Tomorrow's Gonna Be Another Day" (Boyce, Steve Venet) - 2:39
  5. "Papa Gene's Blues" (Michael Nesmith) - 1:57
  6. "Take a Giant Step" (Gerry Goffin, Carole King) - 2:33

Side 2

  1. "Last Train to Clarksville" - 2:44
  2. "This Just Doesn't Seem to Be My Day" - 2:09
  3. "Let's Dance On" - 2:30
  4. "I'll Be True to You" (Goffin, Russ Titelman) - 2:50
  5. "Sweet Young Thing" (Goffin, King, Nesmith) - 1:56
  6. "Gonna Buy Me a Dog" - 2:41

Billboard 200: #1 -- 5× Platinum
Billboard 200: #1 -- 5× Platinum

More Of The Monkees 1967

Side 1

  1. "She" (Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart) - 2:40
  2. "When Love Comes Knockin' (At Your Door)" (Carole Bayer Sager, Neil Sedaka) - 1:49
  3. "Mary, Mary" (Michael Nesmith) - 2:16
  4. "Hold On Girl (Help is on its Way)" (Billy Carr, Jack Keller, Ben Raleigh) - 2:29
  5. "Your Auntie Grizelda" (Diane Hildebrand, Jack Keller) - 2:30
  6. "(I'm Not Your) Steppin' Stone" (Boyce, Hart) - 2:25

Side 2

  1. "Look Out (Here Comes Tomorrow)" (Neil Diamond) - 2:16
  2. "The Kind of Girl I Could Love" (Nesmith, Roger Atkins) - 1:53
  3. "The Day We Fall in Love" (Sandy Linzer, Denny Randell) - 2:26
  4. "Sometime in the Morning" (Gerry Goffin, Carole King) - 2:30
  5. "Laugh" (Phil Margo, Mitch Margo, Hank Medress, Jay Siegel) - 2:30
  6. "I'm a Believer" (Diamond) - 2:50

Billboard 200: #1 -- 2× Platinum
Billboard 200: #1 -- 2× Platinum

Headquarters 1967

Side 1

  1. "You Told Me" (Michael Nesmith) - 2:25
  2. "I'll Spend My Life with You" (Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart) - 2:26
  3. "Forget That Girl" (Douglas Farthing Hatlelid) - 2:25
  4. "Band 6" (Micky Dolenz, Davy Jones, Nesmith, Peter Tork) - 0:41
  5. "You Just May Be the One" (Nesmith) - 2:03
  6. "Shades of Gray" (Barry Mann, Cynthia Weil) - 3:22
  7. "I Can't Get Her Off of My Mind" (Boyce, Hart) - 2:27

Side 2

  1. "For Pete's Sake" (Tork, Joey Richards) - 2:11
  2. "Mr. Webster" (Boyce, Hart) - 2:05
  3. "Sunny Girlfriend" (Nesmith) - 2:33
  4. "Zilch" (Dolenz, Jones, Nesmith, Tork) - 1:06
  5. "No Time" (Hank Cicalo) - 2:08
  6. "Early Morning Blues and Greens" (Diane Hildebrand, Jack Keller) - 2:35
  7. "Randy Scouse Git" (Dolenz) - 2:40

Billboard 200: #1 -- 2× Platinum
Billboard 200: #1 -- 2× Platinum

Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones LTD 1967

Side 1

  1. "Salesman" (Craig Vincent Smith) - 2:37
  2. "She Hangs Out" (Jeff Barry) - 2:57
  3. "The Door into Summer" (Chip Douglas, Bill Martin) - 2:49
  4. "Love Is Only Sleeping" (Barry Mann, Cynthia Weil) - 2:31
  5. "Cuddly Toy" (Harry Nilsson) - 2:38
  6. "Words" (Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart) - 2:52

Side 2

  1. "Hard to Believe" (David Jones, Kim Capli, Eddie Brick, Charlie Rockett) - 2:37
  2. "What Am I Doing Hangin' 'Round?" (Michael Martin Murphey, Owen Castleman) - 3:09
  3. "Peter Percival Patterson's Pet Pig Porky" (Peter Tork) - 0:27
  4. "Pleasant Valley Sunday" (Gerry Goffin, Carole King) - 3:15
  5. "Daily Nightly" (Michael Nesmith) - 2:33
  6. "Don't Call on Me" (Nesmith, John London) - 2:51
  7. "Star Collector" (Goffin, King) - 4:28

Billboard 200: #3 -- Platinum
Billboard 200: #3 -- Platinum

The Birds The Bees & The Monkees 1968

Side 1
  1. "Dream World" (David Jones, Steve Pitts) - 3:22
  2. "Auntie's Municipal Court" (Michael Nesmith, Keith Allison) - 4:05
  3. "We Were Made for Each Other" (Carole Bayer, George Fischoff) - 2:25
  4. "Tapioca Tundra" (Nesmith) - 3:08
  5. "Daydream Believer" (John Stewart) - 3:00
  6. "Writing Wrongs" (Nesmith) - 5:08
Side 2
  1. "I'll Be Back Up On My Feet" (Sandy Linzer, Denny Randell) - 2:26
  2. "The Poster" (Jones, Pitts) - 2:21
  3. "P.O. Box 9847" (Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart) - 3:16
  4. "Magnolia Simms" (Nesmith, Charles Rockett) - 3:48
  5. "Valleri" (Boyce, Hart) - 2:15
  6. "Zor and Zam" (Bill Chadwick, John Chadwick) - 2:10

Billboard 200: #45
Billboard 200: #45

Head 1968

Side 1
  1. "Opening Ceremony" - 1:20
  2. "Porpoise Song (Theme from Head)" (Gerry Goffin, Carole King) - 2:56
  3. "Ditty Diego – War Chant" (Jack Nicholson, Bob Rafelson) - 1:25
  4. "Circle Sky" (Michael Nesmith) - 2:31
  5. "Supplicio" - 0:48
  6. "Can You Dig It" (Peter Tork) - 3:23
  7. "Gravy" - 0:06
Side 2
  1. "Superstitious" - 0:07
  2. "As We Go Along" (King, Toni Stern) - 3:51
  3. "Dandruff?" - 0:39
  4. "Daddy's Song" (Harry Nilsson) - 2:30
  5. "Poll" - 1:13
  6. "Long Title: Do I Have to Do This All Over Again" (Tork) - 2:39
  7. "Swami – Plus Strings (Ken Thorne), Etc." - 5:21

Billboard 200: #32
Billboard 200: #32

Instant Replay1969

Side 1
  1. "Through the Looking Glass" (Red Baldwin, Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart) - 2:43
  2. "Don't Listen to Linda" (Boyce, Hart) - 2:49
  3. "I Won't Be the Same Without Her" (Gerry Goffin, Carole King) - 2:42
  4. "Just a Game" (Micky Dolenz) - 1:49
  5. "Me Without You" (Boyce, Hart) - 2:11
  6. "Don't Wait for Me" (Michael Nesmith) - 2:36
Side 2
  1. "You and I" (Bill Chadwick, David Jones) - 2:15
  2. "While I Cry" (Nesmith) - 3:01
  3. "Teardrop City" (Boyce, Hart) - 1:59
  4. "The Girl I Left Behind Me" (Carole Bayer Sager, Neil Sedaka) - 2:43
  5. "A Man Without a Dream" (Goffin, King) - 3:04
  6. "Shorty Blackwell" (Dolenz) - 5:46

Billboard 200: #100
Billboard 200: #100

The Monkees Present 1969

Side 1
  1. "Little Girl" (Micky Dolenz) - 2:00
  2. "Good Clean Fun" (Michael Nesmith) - 2:19
  3. "If I Knew" (Bill Chadwick, David Jones) - 2:22
  4. "Bye Bye Baby Bye Bye" (Dolenz, Ric Klein) - 2:20
  5. "Never Tell a Woman Yes" (Nesmith) - 3:47
  6. "Looking for the Good Times" (Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart) - 2:04
Side 2
  1. "Ladies Aid Society" (Boyce, Hart) - 2:41
  2. "Listen to the Band" (Nesmith) - 2:42
  3. "French Song" (Chadwick) - 2:25
  4. "Mommy and Daddy" (Dolenz) - 2:13
  5. "Oklahoma Backroom Dancer" (Michael Martin Murphey) - 2:36
  6. "Pillow Time" (Janelle Scott, Matt Willis) - 2:32

Billboard 200: #152
Billboard 200: #152

Changes 1970

Side 1
  1. "Oh My My" (Jeff Barry, Andy Kim) - 3:02
  2. "Ticket on a Ferry Ride" (Barry, Bobby Bloom) - 3:30
  3. "You're So Good to Me" (Barry, Bloom) - 2:34
  4. "It's Got to Be Love" (Neil Goldberg) - 2:25
  5. "Acapulco Sun" (Ned Albright, Steven Soles) - 2:54
  6. "99 Pounds" (Barry) - 2:29
Side 2
  1. "Tell Me Love" (Barry) - 2:38
  2. "Do You Feel It Too?" (Barry, Kim) - 2:37
  3. "I Love You Better" (Barry, Kim) - 2:28
  4. "All Alone in the Dark" (Albright, Soles) - 2:52
  5. "Midnight Train" (Micky Dolenz) - 2:07
  6. "I Never Thought It Peculiar" (Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart) - 2:29

Then and Now... the Best of The Monkees was a 1986 compilation album of songs released due to the 1986 revival of "Monkeemania," by Arista Records.
Then and Now... the Best of The Monkees was a 1986 compilation album of songs released due to the 1986 revival of "Monkeemania," by Arista Records.

Then & Now 1986 (Compilation)

Side 1

  1. "(Theme From) The Monkees"
  2. "Last Train to Clarksville"
  3. "Take a Giant Step"
  4. "I'm a Believer"
  5. "(I'm Not Your) Steppin' Stone"
  6. "A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You"
  7. "Anytime, Anyplace, Anywhere"

Side 2

  1. "That Was Then, This is Now"
  2. "The Girl I Knew Somewhere"
  3. "Pleasant Valley Sunday"
  4. "What Am I Doing Hangin' Round"
  5. "Daydream Believer"
  6. "Valleri"
  7. "Kicks"

Bilboard 200: #72
Bilboard 200: #72

Pool It 1987

  1. "Heart and Soul" (Simon Byrne, Andrew Howell)
  2. "(I'd Go The) Whole Wide World" (Eric Goulden)
  3. "Long Way Home" (Dick Eastman, Bobby Hart)
  4. "Secret Heart" (Brian Fairweather, Martin Page)
  5. "Gettin' In" (Peter Tork)
  6. "(I'll) Love You Forever" (David Jones)
  7. "Every Step of the Way" (Mark Clarke, Ian Hunter)
  8. "Don't Bring Me Down" (Bill Teeley, Glenn Wyka)
  9. "Midnight" (David)
  10. "She's Movin' in with Rico" (Andrew Howell)
  11. "Since You Went Away" (Michael Levine)
  12. "Counting on You" (Alan Green)

Although preliminary work on the album was begun using songs from various writers, upon Nesmith's agreement to join the production it was agreed that all songs would be written only by the four members of the group.
Although preliminary work on the album was begun using songs from various writers, upon Nesmith's agreement to join the production it was agreed that all songs would be written only by the four members of the group. | Source

Justus 1996

  1. "Circle Sky" (Michael Nesmith) Lead Vocals: Nesmith 3:33
  2. "Never Enough" (Micky Dolenz) Lead Vocals: Dolenz 2:58
  3. "Oh, What a Night" (Davy Jones) Lead Vocals: Jones 3:12
  4. "You and I" (Dolenz, Jones) Lead Vocals: Jones 2:57
  5. "Unlucky Stars" (Dolenz) Lead Vocals: Dolenz 3:11
  6. "Admiral Mike" (Nesmith) Lead Vocals: Dolenz 3:23
  7. "Dyin' of a Broken Heart" (Dolenz) Lead Vocals: Dolenz 3:09
  8. "Regional Girl" (Dolenz) Lead Vocals: Dolenz 3:16
  9. "Run Away from Life" (Peter Tork) Lead Vocals: Jones 2:43
  10. "I Believe You" (Tork) Lead Vocals: Tork 3:41
  11. "It's My Life" (Dolenz) Lead Vocals: Dolenz 3:41
  12. "It's Not Too Late" (Jones) Lead Vocals: Jones 4:03

Nesmith's Last Monkees concert/ 50th Anniversary

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Good Times 2016


1. Good Times

2. You Bring The Summer

3. She Makes Me Laugh

4. Our Own World

5. Gotta Give It Time

6. Me & Magdalena

7. Whatever's Right

8. Love To Love

9. Little Girl

10. Birth of An Accidental Hipster

11. Wasn't Born To Follow

12. I Know What I Know

13. I Was There And I'm Told I Had A Good Time

14. Me & Magdalena [Version 2]

Nesmith's Final Show 9-12- 2016

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The Fans Speak Out

"My diatribe on the Monkees not being in the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame ...Three of the Monkees played to a packed house at the Beacon in NYC last month, with roars, standing ovations and a lot of love & respect.Here were three out of four guys from a band made for TV- singing, playing, joking around- cranking out hits, TV favorites, B-sides, cult favorites and other rarities for 2 straight hours, with one Monkee occasionally leaving for a break while the others entertained. The only top 40 hit they didn’t seem to do was DW Washburn. Sure there were moments where the three would just be in front of a large band ensemble, which included guitars, horns, keyboards and percussion. But, they were entitled.Peter was a big highlight of the evening. He sang an on an equal amount of songs with the other two. He sang his material and some of Nesmith’s. He played lead keyboards on several songs, lead and rhythm guitar, banjo and even a flugelhorn. This man has been through hell and here he was for two hours entertaining. That courage alone should get the band into this “hall” (but more on that later).

Micky played drums on almost half of the songs and stayed pace with the band drummer. His vocals weren’t vintage 60s, but he still had that distinct 60s voice, on which that alone should put this band in the “hall” (but more on that later). The humor was still there as was the energy. He played acoustic guitar later in the night.Davy was funny, flamboyant, with some “diva” moments, and just being Davy. Though he is not my favorite Monkee, He has to be there more so that the ever missing Nesmith (my favorite, but attendance not required). Davy got all the middle aged ladies in the audience to dance and sing along. I knew Davy played some acoustic gutitar and he didn’t disappoint, but was shocked me most was when he got on the drum kit. I zoomed in from the upper balcony with my little binoculars. He REALLY was playing folks. He wasn’t Neil Pert, but hey hey.

The Nes, while it would have been great for a guest appearance, really isn’t required for this show set up. I saw them without him in 86 and 89, but this show was far more entertaining, and more musicianship from the three. Several of his originals were in, so he was there in one way.There was no faking or lip syncing here.Now the um “hall” thing. My Mike Lovean rant: These guys have toured as four, three, two and one since their 86 comeback. They got approval last month from one of the toughest cities in the business. I don’t see “hall” contemporaries Creedence, Beach Boys, the Animals, the Byrds, the Young Rascals and Lovin Spoonful with many surviving members on the tour circuit other than portions, pieces, fake replacements and fragments. Two of the above mentioned bands also relied heavily on the Wrecking Crew for studio material. There has to be some merit at longevity, even if it is only rehashing old hits. That was them, playing now.

They sang so many hits it was dizzying. From day one, that was Micky mostly on those hit singles, with Davy and Mike on occasion. So he did it for a TV show- it was still HIS vocal. Yeah his own drumming came later, but he did it. You don’t get up in front of thousands if you can’t.The energy was electrifying. A bunch of 60 year olds on the rock stage-like to see some of the above mentioned hall of fame bands collectively try it. Hell they can’t even sit in a room together. Get over it. Look at Mr. Tork - that is just pure courage and inspiration.Hall of Fame? I think the three gentlemen would prefer the massive accolades showering on them on this tour after all of these years than to rust on an elite hand picked wall in Cleveland like the rest of the groups mentioned."


"I was one of those'teeny-boppers' in the '60's who saw The Monkees in Houston,Texas -(at that same concert,we also saw an unknown crazy-acting genius named Jimi Hendrix!) Then many yrs later, I took my teenage daughters to see them,after they literally BEGGED me! I don't know too many artists that can draw that diverse of an age group even to this day. We all still love their music. It's always fresh-sounding & cool. Absolutely, they should be in the Hall of Fame. It's ridiculous they aren't! Too bad they let our favorite in the group, Davy Jones, pass away without this honor. May he rest in peace."


"Why shouldn't the Monkees be added into the Hall of Fame? They were at a changing point of our lives, with VietNam and soldiers coming back to homes they found familiar and changed. We went thru hell during the 70's and music reminded us who we were and what we felt. Last train to Clarksville was for all those small town boys, coming home from war, hoping that their lives will be the same and that she would be there for him. Cheer Up sleepy Jean, was for all those young ladies who dreamed of the day being with the one she loved and building a life, with hope to have one. Even Randy Scouse Skit had it's own meaning, of the insanity that was around us, the uncertainty what's ahead of us and how we will react when we are faced with it all. The Monkees brought all that to us in music, whether they wrote it or not, they delivered it to the masses and the fans cheered them and we're still cheering for them. Let the Monkees in!"


"The reasons we usually hear -- I don't know from whom -- for their non-inclusion are (1) they didn't play their own instruments, (2) they were a "manufactured" group, and (3) they didn't write most of their hits.

To these, I offer: (1) The Beach Boys, whose work in the 1960s was played largely by Glen Campbell, Hal Blaine and the Wrecking Crew, and also Crosby Stills & Nash, whose albums featured them playing guitars, but with exceptional session musicians behind them. (2) Other bands in the RRHOF came together as "manufactured" rather than just friends who grew up together. The aforementioned CS&N, for example, were introduced to each other through other professionals while they were still with The Byrds, The Buffalo Springfield, and the Hollies respectively. A better example would be the Jimi Hendrix Experience, which was Jimi plus Noel and Mitch, who were recruited and contracted to be his band. Finally (3) Elvis wrote none of his own songs."


"The omission of The Monkees from the RRHOF is the Hall's most glaring snub and most egregious flaw. ...and this organization has MANY flaws. Why on earth are Public Enemy and Run DMC in the ROCK AND ROLL Hall of Fame? They were big artists with big popular hits? OK, then I would expect Frank Sinatra to be inducted immediately, based on those criteria. Either keep it as a "Rock Hall of Fame", which excludes rap (which isn't music anyway because it doesn't meet the definition), hip-hop, and maybe even disco, or make it a "Music Hall of Fame" and get Beethoven, Sinatra, and Louis Armstrong in there right away. Right now, it's basically the Wenner Hall of Fame, and between him and Greil Marcus, their tastes are notoriously inexplicable. (Rolling Stone HATED HATED HATED Led Zeppelin. HATED Cream. And don't even get me started on the ridiculous artists they loved that didn't deserve it.)"


"Despite the snobbery against them by that overrated “Serious Sixties” crap. What hypocrisy especially when all along The Beatles sang some silly gibberish, and even wore costumes as walruses, bears, and chickens! WTF!? And Beatles had been marketed as a KIDDIE TV CARTOON.That’s more “respectable” than the Monkees project? Sure…..1967’s Magical Mystery Tour is a lame bus wreck by the Beatles attempting to copy the success of The Monkees. But the Monkees had did it better — AS MUSIC TELEVISION.Induct Nesmith, Dolenz, Jones and Tork. They have every right to be honored (as did Neil Diamond, a Monkees songwriter himself).When’s the last time you heard the Monkees on the radio? Today. Any given day. They endure in the soundtrack of Americana.The Monkees episodes with ‘reality cam’ commentaries often were political and youth-topical. (Oh, how Rolling Stone Mag worships any artist who gets more political… right?) So, if BEING POLITICAL counts, The Monkees deserve respect there too.And overall, they ROCKED, are fun, still, and are genuine entertainment. Viva la Monkee!—– And when the topic comes around to does KISS deserve to be in the Rock N Roll Hall of Fame….. YES they deserve it too. They are rock stars."

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TruSoulDJ is a self proclaimed expert on all things trivial to the Mainstream. He is an avid classic comic book reader, non popular music lover and tv-show-on-dvd binge watcher who shops the clearance racks near and far to find the best deals. He would like to think he knows everything important within the realm of Pop culture. But in actuality, he only knows about 99.9 percent of what he thinks he knows.

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