Think Like a Man Too

Straight Talk With Steve Harvey

Think Like A Man Too

Director: Tim Story

Writers: Keith Merryman, David A. Newman, Steve Harvey

Cast: Kevin Hart, Gabrielle Union, Wendi McLendon-Covey, Adam Brody, Michael Ealy, Jerry Ferrara, Meagan Good, Regina Hall, Dennis Haysbert, Taraji P. Henson, Terrence Jenkins, Jenifer Lewis, Romany Malco, Gary Owen, David Walton, Ronald De Voe

Synopsis: All the couples are back for a wedding in Las Vegas, but plans for a romantic weekend go awry when their various misadventures get them into some compromising situations that threaten to derail the big event.

MPAA Rating: Rated PG-13 for crude sexual content including references, partial nudity, language and drug material

Stevennix2001's Rating:

2 / 10

Pros:

- Acting was fairly decent

- Other actors help balance out Kevin Hart's style of comedy

- At least, one of the couples had an original subplot; unlike the others that face similar (if not the same) problems as last time.

Cons:

- Jokes are poorly written, as you can see the punchline coming from a mile away.

- Most the subplots feel like a generic rehash of everything that happened in the last movie.

- The story gets resolved in almost the exact same way the last movie did.

- Extremely predictable and cliched.

- Weird editing choice to insert "Poison" music video in the middle of the film.

- The movie reinforces ethnic stereotypes in possibly the unfunniest way possible.

The game just got real....

You want to know something funny? Steve Harvey once said, during an interview, that all men will make as many mistakes as women allow them to make in a relationship. Ironically, movie franchises tend to work the same way. If you keep spending money on a piece of crap film series that constantly makes the same damn mistakes, then chances are the filmmakers behind the franchise are never going to learn anything.

Not only does "Think Like a Man Too" repeat every single flaw the first one had, but it even manages to repeat a lot of the same story arcs that the first one covered. I would call this movie a generic rehash of the first one, but that would be stating the ridiculously obvious. Sure, there's a few scenario changes here and there, like the momma's boy getting married to the single mom from the first one. But like the first movie, he's still put into a situation where he has to choose between the woman he loves, or his mom that seems to relish acting like a real b***** around her. Seriously, why do we need to retread this same old story arc again? We already saw who he chose last time, so is it really going to matter if he's forced to make the same damn decision the second time?

Or, how guy with the commitment issues is now struggling to accept the fact that his wife now wants to have a baby; hence he's forced into another dilemma of dealing with the idea that he'll have to grow up to appease his lover again. Gee, first it was commitment to even ask her to marry him. Now, he's struggling with the idea of even becoming a father. I'm guessing, in the third one, he'll probably be going through a midlife crisis, while dealing with issues of him being more responsible as a father.

Of course, you also have the business woman that struggles to deal with the thought of financial success; while it could conflict with her relationship with her boyfriend, who continues to follow his dreams of becoming a chef someday. But it's okay, they add a subtle twist this time. During the film, he's offered a job to work as a Sous Chef, for "Planet Hollywood." But unlike his girlfriend, he seems to immediately turn it down because it would mean being away from his girlfriend. Aww isn't that so sweet? But as one of his buddies is quick to ask, would she be willing to do the same if the roles were reversed?

As luck would have it, she too is offered a prestigious promotion, but it would mean moving away from her boyfriend. But unlike him, she's a bit reluctant about it. Hmm...this is awfully similar to their last story arc, where she was in love with him, but she didn't want to be with him because he wasn't making a six figure salary like she was. Now, she's caught in a similar situation where she must determine what's more important. Financial success? Or love?

And, let's not forget our final couple that features an ex playboy, and his fashion designer girlfriend. I will give kudos to the movie for at least being original with this couple. In this one, it seems like his girlfriend has a hard time accepting the fact that her boyfriend was such a playboy, back in the day. Heck, they can't even walk across the street without running into some ex girlfriend that he slept with, or some guy idolizing his playboy shenanigans. Needless to say, this puts a big strain on their relationship to the point that it forces him to try to win her back.

Meanwhile, Kevin Hart is up to his nonsensical shenanigans again, as he's there mostly for comedic relief. Plus, they even give the token white guy a bigger part this time...by making him seem like a lame dumbass. Um...cool?

However, that's nothing compared to the fact his wife (who happens to be white too) is portrayed as a nerdy uptight stick in the mud, but she's suddenly given soul when she goes out on a night on the town with the other black girls of the group. Why is it that all white people are lame until they get influenced by black people, in Urban comedies?

Is Hollywood really trying to say that all white people are naturally lame? While all black people naturally cool? I mean they are aware that not all blacks are cool, and not all whites are lame right? Oh well, the movie doesn't seem to care that it reinforces various stereotypes, so why should I bother?

If you've seen the last movie, then chances are you know exactly how this one shakes out. Most of the protagonists go through similar bulls*** problems again, but all of them get resolved in very similar (if not the same) way that it was handled the first time. Sure, there's different scenarios here and there, but the basic premises for each of these relationships is fundamentally the same.

Kevin Hart still narrates the entire film, while adding in a touch of comedy relief here and there. Fortunately, his co stars actually do balance him out this time around, to make him seem less annoying. However, the jokes around his character seem rather cliched, and it tends to get boring after a while. Every joke about his character is a running gag throughout the film, but the payoff is nothing more than some lame predictable punchline you saw coming from a mile away.

It almost seems like Tim Story didn't even take this film seriously, as the "Poison" music video is literally played in the middle of the damn movie; with credits on the lower left hand corner of the screen and everything, like you'd see in a music video.

Although, I have to admit the acting wasn't that bad, but I wouldn't call it great either.

Overall, this film is just flat out boring. Every joke is predictable and cliched. The story feels more like a rehash of everything that the first film was trying to accomplish, which makes "Think Like a Man Too" feel more like a cash grab than anything else. How this film could beat out "Jersey Boys" at the box office is beyond me, as this movie isn't even worth checking out on netflix. If I were you, I'd avoid this one entirely; unless you're a huge Kevin Hart fan.

Poison Music Video (Take in mind, this music video is literally in the same damn film..)

© 2014 Steven Escareno

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