Zinnia Flowers - A Photo Gallery and Information

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History and Facts about Zinnia Flowers

Our Experience with Zinnias

I came across a zinnia quite by accident for the first time. A packet of zinnia seeds were given to me. Having a three year old son, and being a stay at home mom at the time, I decided to turn the event into a fun learning experience. Digging in dirt, preparing it and planting seeds was great fun for us both, as it turned out.

I smile now as I look back because we had just a very long, but small patch of dirt to work with. I recall showing my son how to read the back of the flower packet, and we planted the seeds accordingly. We watered with the watering can, and then had to wait. By July 4, our Independence day in the US, you should have seen our zinnia flower garden! It looked somewhat like the photo below, where there are many colors of bright zinnia flowers. I was in love, and have grown them ever since whenever I could.

History of the Zinnia Flower

The zinnia gets its name from Johann Gottfried Zinn, or J.G. Zinn. He was a professor of Botany and Natural History at the University of Gottingen. He was born on December 6, 1727, and was a student under Haller. One of his greatest "claims to fame" come from showing the demonstration of the relation of vision to the activity in the brain, and on to the structure of the eye. The essay is called "Description Anatomica Oculi Humani." I am thankful to this man, as that whole process is so fascinating to me. It had to sound mind boggling to people for the first time I am sure. He also is known for his catalogue of plants in the Academical Garden of Gottingen. He died very young, on April 6, 1759, when he was only 32 years old.

Another important service J.G. Zinn rendered to science was his catalogue of the plants in the Academical Garden of Gottingen.

Native of Mexico

The zinnia itself is a native of Mexico. Having grown it extensively over the years, I can see why it would thrive in Mexico. Some have called it the Mexican marigold, especially when you look at the buttery yellow varieties. I have grown marigolds also, and to me, they are very different, but I can kind of understand the comparison.


Growing Zinnias

Growing zinnias is relatively easy to do, in my experience. You can grow them in pots or right in the ground. Simply follow the seed packet instructions, and they should come up wonderfully. Plant soon after the last possible frost in your area, and plant them where you want them. They will grow happily, but generally don't like being transplanted.

Pick or cut off the spent flower blooms, to keep the plant blooming happily. They will give you joy all Summer long, and the butterflies will love you for growing them.

There are several varieties of zinnias, and there are some different one's shown here in this article. I hope you enjoy the photos I have taken here. You can get an idea of the many different zinnia flowers out there.

Over the last couple of years as I have been to the nursery, or browsing through seed catalogues, I have noticed many new varieties. Simply pick what you like! Know the California Giants have been an ongoing favorite of mine. I grow them whenever I can.

Collecting Zinnia Seeds

At the end of the season, I pinch off the spent blooms less and less. This allows for the seed heads to grow and produce many seeds for the next season. We had a neighbor that grew lovely red zinnias for many years. He collected and saved the seeds, and shared them with neighbors. They were lovely, and I always thought that was very thoughtful of our neighbor. It is so easy to do, and very rewarding, and virtually free to do after the first seed packet.

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Comments 14 comments

snakeslane profile image

snakeslane 4 years ago from Canada

This is another lovely flower hub oceansnsunsets. I love the splotched hot pink on white one, and the salmon colored looks like a little geum flower. Zinnias don't like the rainy climate I live in, but I still admire them wistfully, and once in a while I use them in a hanging basket or pot of flowers. Cause you never know what kind of summer it's going to be. There's been a few that have been extremely hot and sunny, a perfect Zinnia summer.


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 4 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Hello Snakeslane, thank you very much. The one you mentioned, hot pink on white, is a peppermint stick zinnia variety. The salmon one was new to me, a favorite! For some reason, that was the only one that made it, as the pot was under a water spout and got saturated in a storm or something. That plant put off several pretty salmon colored ones though.

So glad you can grow them sometimes, even in a more rainy climate. They sure do love those hot Summers, they seem to really thrive. So glad you stopped by, and thank you for the comment.


Rosie writes profile image

Rosie writes 4 years ago from Virginia

Okay, now I want to grow zinnias. Only wish it was warm enough. My neighbor has them all around her yard and they are beautiful. They reseed year after year and she uses them for cut flower arrangements in her home. I always assumed they were difficult to grow, but after reading your article, I will definitely give them a try.


savingkathy profile image

savingkathy 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada

I have never grown zinnias in my garden, but after reading your hub I think I will try some this year. They are so colorful, and it's good to know that they're easy to grow from seeds.

Thanks for sharing - I enjoyed your photos.


kevins blog52 profile image

kevins blog52 4 years ago from southern Indiana

Great hub oceansnsunsets, very interesting and educational, beautiful pictures to. I voted up and interesting.


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 4 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Hi Rosie, That is nice that your neighbor uses zinnias for flower arrangements. I bet they are beautiful. I love flowers that reseed, and come back again and again. Do try your hand at growing them, you may be surprised at just how easy they are to grow! Thanks for your comment. :)

Savingkathy, thanks for stopping by and leaving your nice comment. I think you should give it a try, you may just love them. Appreciate your comment. :)

Kevin, thank you very much. So glad you commented, voted and stopped by. :)


mary615 profile image

mary615 4 years ago from Florida

This is one of my favorites! They are so easy to grow; they are the perfect flower to get children interested in gardening. Thanks for another beautiful gallery of flowers. BTW, as an expert on plants and flowers: I am in Puerto Rico, and I saw a tree that I wish I knew what it was. I asked in the Forums, but no one knows. The topic was started by someone asking for help in identifying a Boungavilla (sp) Could you take a look and see if you know what it is? Thanks a bunch


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 4 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Hello Mary! So glad to hear it is a favorite! I agree, they are just so easy to grow and a perfect flower to get kids interested in gardening. You get a long of "bang" for your buck, so to speak.

I appreciate your very kind comment about being an expert on plants and flowers! I will try to find that forum thread, and see what I can do. I am not an expert, but I hope to be one day.


mary615 profile image

mary615 4 years ago from Florida

I think you are very knowledgeable about plants! Many thanks for your help. Goodnight.


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 4 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Mary, I did just finally find the photo that I think you were asking about. If it is the one in the one thread, I agree with you and the others there, that it is a Bougainvillea. Those are so beautiful and bright. They don't grow well here in the Midwest where I live, but I do love them all the same.

Thank you for your very kind words, you made my day as I love plants so much.


mary615 profile image

mary615 4 years ago from Florida

Thanks so much! I appreciate your time on this.


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 4 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Sure thing, Mary. :) So happy to have you as a friend on HubPages, I love your hubs and think you have so many wonderful things to share. Have a great night.


Deborah Brooks profile image

Deborah Brooks 4 years ago from Brownsville,TX

I love this hub these flowers are beautiful great job

voted up

Debbie


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 4 years ago from The Midwest, USA Author

Hello Debbie, I love zinnias also, and its great to meet others that like them so much too. Thanks for your kind words and vote also. I really appreciate it.

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