TV Review: America -- The Story of Us

The British were appalled that the American soldiers would kill officers.

The first commercial caught me completely unawares, so smooth was the segue from the story of our first settlers in the New World to one of the first banks in America.  The announcer told how that same bank evolved into one of the sponsors for tonight's broadcast: Bank of America.  The computer generated visuals were as visually stunning and  meshed with the live action as was the first episode itself, "The Rebels".  

It has been rare in my experience to hear of  Puritans and Jamestown settlers referred to as such.  Narrator Liv Schreiber tells us that these rebels were “business men and true believers”. Although I am not a fan of computer generated images in the movies, I am a  loyal fan of The History Channel and have never had a problem with their use of CGI.  In this series, it looks to be a mainstay of the production along with live  re-enactments of historical events.  The technology is so impressive, it’s often difficult to distinguish CGI from live action. 
In “The Rebels” we meet one of the colonies' first entrepreneurs,  John Rolfe, a shrewd farmer who defied Spain’s grip on tobacco seeds and changed Jamestown from a ghost town into a boom town.  For the next century and a half, tobacco was our largest single export.  Donald Trump interrupts the re-enactments and CGI with a brief statement about success and luck with a brief tribute to the hard working colonists.  Throughout the series noteworthy Americans offer comments and opinions about our country and what it means to be an American.   Perhaps it is a good time for us all to stop and ask ourselves what it means to us, to be Americans.
The second commercial presented a pleasant and unexpected surprise.  Ed Whitacre, Chairman and CEO of General Motors, announced that his company has repaid their government bail-out five years ahead of schedule.  It wasn't entirely institutional advertising as he went on to talk about GM's innovative life-saving products like OnStar.   
In one of many activities to support the premiere, HISTORYTM commissioned an online survey by the Harris Interactive company to "gauge Americans' feeling and attitudes about the figures, events, ideas and innovations that have shaped American history." A significant part of the poll asked for opinions or votes on events, documents, innovations and people that have left lasting impressions or helped invent our country.  The electric light, the internet, the Hoover Dam, Lewis & Clark, and the first amendment to the Constitution all got the most votes in their categories. To no surprise, George Washington was recognized as our greatest founding father garnering twice the votes of second place Thomas Jefferson.  Bernie Madoff edged out Timothy McVeigh by one per centage point as our "biggest villain" and the American flag doubled the votes for first place over the Statue of Liberty as our "most iconic symbol".

Seven generations after the colony at Jamestown, one-third of England’s ships were made in the American Colonies, forty per cent of British exports came to the colonies, and American timber fueled the global economy. After an incident involving wine shipments on one of John Hancock’s ships, the British occupied Boston with one solder for every four colonists. Thanks to Ben Franklin, the colonies had a communications network that was the best in the world. These events provided a foundation for the birth of a nation. The second episode is "Revolution" and begins in New York City, 1776, with a population of about twenty thousand. The British unleashed the largest armada of ships they would ever assemble until D-Day and launched the biggest attack on New York until 9-11-2001.

When I reviewed the survey results, I was surprised to discover what we as a country DON'T know. [2,450 American adults aged 18 or older surveyed online]Fifty-one per cent of us do not know in which decade slavery was abolished ( 1860's).Forty-eight per cent of us do not know in which decade women were given the right to vote(1920's) and sixty per cent could not name the conflict/war that resulted in the greatest number of American casualties (the Civil War).
The Beatles sang, "You say you want a revolution
Well, you know
We all want to change the world."

George Washington and his "rag tag" army along with their supporters certainly wanted to change the world and "Revolution" shows us how they did it. Washington brought in talented men to help him re-invent his army, devise new strategies for war and defeat seasoned soldiers from the world's undefeated superpower. Saratoga was the turning point but it took six years of perseverance to get to Yorktown.
The twelve-hour series premiered Sunday, April 25, 9PM ET/PT, and continues with new episodes airing on Sundays through Memorial Day.

What would you say has been America's greatest achievement?
The top vote getter in this poll was: "A constitution stating that all men are created equal."

THE DAY AFTER

From The History Channel's press release today:
"New York, April 26, 2010 – The first night of AMERICA THE STORY OF US has become the highest rated, most watched special in network history, it was announced today by Nancy Dubuc, President and General Manager, HISTORY™.  The first night was watched by 5.7 million total viewers and drew a 4.0 household rating.  Last night 8-11pm will go down as HISTORY's best night ever across the board (based on Fast Cable ratings)."

Comments 8 comments

rebekahELLE profile image

rebekahELLE 6 years ago from Tampa Bay

what an excellent review. I can read your enthusiasm as well in your words. I loved watching the first nights episodes.

The CGI is so nice. it makes the history come alive. I couldn't help but think about the perseverance and determination that gave birth to this nation. we can't ever forget it. this series is coming at an important time in our nation and I'm thrilled that so many watched it last night!

I would love to see this hub on the front page of HP! Are you going to write reviews of each episode? I hope so. I'm a new follower!


FCEtier profile image

FCEtier 6 years ago from Cold Mountain Author

Thank you for your kind remarks and for following me. I'll probably write more on this series. Thanks for your encouragement and for following!


loveofnight profile image

loveofnight 6 years ago from Baltimore, Maryland

cracking write-up, very informative


Pamela99 profile image

Pamela99 6 years ago from United States

Great review. I love when they do these types of series. I am taping all of them so I don't miss any. Thanks


FCEtier profile image

FCEtier 6 years ago from Cold Mountain Author

Thank you loveofnight and Pamela99 for stopping by and for your comments!


Russ 6 years ago

I find the series great but I believe it was WWII that had the highest number of U.S. casualties. My research indicates that WWII also had the highest number of deaths for the U.S..


FCEtier profile image

FCEtier 6 years ago from Cold Mountain Author

Russ,

Thanks for reading my article and for commenting. I did no research, just reported THC's survey. On the surface, it sounds logical since we were on both sides of the same war and it lasted approximately four years.

How big a margin do your numbers show between the casualties in each war?


Russ 6 years ago

Though I tend not to use Wikipedia this page does summarize the data pretty nicely and uses good reference material.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_casualt...

The total dead is fairly close but the total casualties has a wide margin. If I remember lecture and reading well enough the Civil War number are believed to be wrong on the low side.

By percentage of population the Civil War has the biggest numbers by far.

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