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Name the band you think has had the most impact on music.

  1. shazwellyn profile image84
    shazwellynposted 7 years ago

    Let me start .. Joy Division, because of unique sound.  There really wasnt anything like it at the time and since. Many bands model themselves on them and they are thought of as highly influencial.  If it werent for Joy division, there may not have been Editor and Interpol, for example.

    1. dutchman1951 profile image60
      dutchman1951posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Buddy Holly, if its historical you are looking for
      not sure

      Jon

      1. shazwellyn profile image84
        shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Im looking for major influences... yes Buddy Holly has had a great impact on music! x

    2. Drew Breezzy profile image80
      Drew Breezzyposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      hate to say it but the beatles

    3. steve1717 profile image60
      steve1717posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Beatles without a doubt.

  2. Sufidreamer profile image81
    Sufidreamerposted 7 years ago

    Has to be 'The Pixies'.

    They saved us from atrocious big hair rock smile

  3. wesleyacarter profile image60
    wesleyacarterposted 7 years ago

    As for modern rock bands. Tool. there is no band that hasn't been influenced by them one way or another.

    Each musician sets a standard and their messages are extremely involved, dynamic and intelligent.

    if we are looking for historical, then I would say that its between the beatles and probably frank zappa.

    1. shazwellyn profile image84
      shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      yes.. this is good.. they have both helped music evolve into many different genres.

  4. hudsonj1994 profile image60
    hudsonj1994posted 7 years ago

    The Fray big_smile I love that band

  5. SimeyC profile image89
    SimeyCposted 7 years ago

    The Beatles probably had the widest influence - then there's Led Zepplin.....and of course....ABBA *grin*

    1. Jeffrey Neal profile image87
      Jeffrey Nealposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I'm surprised it took 6 posts before someone mentioned Led Zepplin.

    2. shazwellyn profile image84
      shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      God.. yes.. Abba - very melodic with great chorus and hook lines x

  6. pioneer_writer5 profile image60
    pioneer_writer5posted 7 years ago

    The Rolling Stones had a great impact on Rock music.

    1. shazwellyn profile image84
      shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      They would have to form part of the trunk in my tree example.. i think,

  7. SimeyC profile image89
    SimeyCposted 7 years ago

    I should also mention Rush. They always seem to be the forgotten rock band...but they influenced so many...Tool for one....and they were also voted the best musicians of the 70s (I think!) - OK so I am very biased - but a lot of the rock bands of the 70s such as Floyd, Sabbath, Zepplin, Rush, Scorpions, Rainbow, Deep Purple really brought Rock to the forefront and have influenced modern day rock...

    1. shazwellyn profile image84
      shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Another branch here.. psychodelia into metal..so who influenced them?

  8. profile image0
    LEWJposted 7 years ago

    As for the times of and beyond the 1960s, I'd offer the Beatles for that designation.   Why?
    Because soft Rock,  heavy metal,  70s punk (which sometimes resembled a hybrid child of heavy metal),  chamber instrument Rock (like  the string work in Eleanor Rigby), Eastern instrumentation (Harrison pieces) and newly experimental Rock, all began inside the Beatles.
    These styles were either suggested in their work or definably started.   Helter Skelter is credited as the first clear sample of heavy metal in Rock music.  Through effective experimentation, they helped Rock music to grow up, in a sense, beyond its doo-wop period.   Then they proceeded to build on the growth they'd spawned, causing it to go in new directions.

    The above musical forms diverged and morphed over the following decades but are recognized by aware music folk as being Beatle innovations.
    The Beatles also took the lead in breaking the 3-minute studio record barrier by introducing some hugely popular "long"  songs like Hey Jude and A Day In The Life, which started to get radio airplay.  That changed the radio airplay format.                A  formidable accomplishment.
    This change can be traced by a comparison of studio song length up to the time of the appearance of certain of their songs.

    The Beatles broadened the type of song themes that could be included in Rock music, and in the process actually got teenagers to listen to and love music they could'nt dance to-!                A revolutionary achievement in itself....
    They introduced sudden and occasionally radical yet enjoyable changes in song tempo, chord progression and tonal imagery.   
    The boys from Liverpool are also credited with introducing the  "concept"  album  to Rock music.
    They did all this, and they did it prolificly.   Who did they influence and musically inspire?   Some of everybody then and that came after them on the pop scene, including the contemporary Beach Boys after they heard the Beatles' Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band album.
    By the time they broke up they had to their credit a large collection of art, a lot of it good, much of it excellent, and some of it truly great.

    1. shazwellyn profile image84
      shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Yes... and it was skiffle that influenced the beatles... (Now I think my tree is starting to form roots). x

  9. Jon Green profile image84
    Jon Greenposted 7 years ago

    Definitely The Beatles - just ask any band, they are always acknowledged as the most creative. LEWJ has done such a good job, I'll just agree!

  10. shazwellyn profile image84
    shazwellynposted 7 years ago

    Kraftwerk----

  11. zadrobi profile image61
    zadrobiposted 7 years ago

    Among others, Chuck Berry.

    1. shazwellyn profile image84
      shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      would you say Bill Hayley?  Elvis... now we are moving into the realms of Gospel, arent we?

  12. Sufidreamer profile image81
    Sufidreamerposted 7 years ago

    Bo Diddley has to be one of the roots - one of the first to really experiment with electric guitars smile

    EDIT: Kraftwerk is a good shout - Gary Numan, too - a big influence upon industrial metal.

    If you are looking for branches, Bathory were at the forefront of black metal etc.

    1. shazwellyn profile image84
      shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      could we put him into skiffle?  Or does he merge into folk?  We do need some folk influences here..

  13. Pearldiver profile image87
    Pearldiverposted 7 years ago

    The Bumble Town Council Men's Room Quartet!

    These guys were responsible for the introduction of Tuber sounds into the orchestral movements of the mayor and his councellors. lol

    The Quartet also went on to be major contributors to the musical development of Whoopee Cushions. big_smile

    1. shazwellyn profile image84
      shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      LOL .. we had someone like that play at the Glastonbury Festival last year... hehehe... I wonder if Neil Young liked them!

  14. Sufidreamer profile image81
    Sufidreamerposted 7 years ago

    Diddly was blues/rock - ZZ Top cited him as their biggest influence!

    Folk: Django Reinhardt and Planxty. Not sure about the US folk scene smile

  15. shazwellyn profile image84
    shazwellynposted 7 years ago

    Going back... Paul Robeson - a great baratone vocalist who championed the cause for black people through music.  C1930s!

  16. profile image0
    LEWJposted 7 years ago

    Historically speaking, Blues, Jazz, and Country pre-dated and influenced skiffle.
    The Beatles were deeply influenced by Blues music after they dropped skiffle.
    Blues and Jazz are something like the Poppa of 20th century musical influence, enclosing even skiffle.    Blues and Jazz influenced the development of Rock Music, as history again shows.
    And if somebody ever gets the notion to hear an orchestral version of the roots of Rock n' Roll and Pop Music, all they have to do is quietly take in Stravinsky's  La Sacre Du Printemps (The Rite Of Spring, 1913).

  17. tony0724 profile image60
    tony0724posted 7 years ago

    Hands down The Beatles as they revolutionized and changed the face of Modern Rock and Roll . You have to Include Led Zep and The Ramones as well . Both were heavy Influences on modern music as It Is done today . Rage against the Machine was probably one of the Bigger Influences on modern rock In the last 20 years .

    1. shazwellyn profile image84
      shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      agreed, ... what about punk? THE CLASH 'London Calling'! Later, the style merged into dub

  18. TimTurner profile image81
    TimTurnerposted 7 years ago

    No band influenced the entire music spectrum.  You would have to pick bands in different genres that influenced the entire genre.

    I would think Elvis had more of an influence on rock, country and blues over the Beatles.

    But it's hard finding one artist that affected music in all genres.

    1. tony0724 profile image60
      tony0724posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Yes there Is , The Beatles ! 40 years later they have a guitar hero game named In their resume !

      1. TimTurner profile image81
        TimTurnerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Elvis inspired the Beatles smile

        1. sannyasinman profile image59
          sannyasinmanposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          So did Chuck Berry, but The Beatles took things to a completely new level.

          1. profile image0
            LEWJposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            Exactly....I think that if the overall radius and scope of impact on music is confined to ONE BAND (as originally asked in this forum's title), after all is said and done the journey would lead right back to The Beatles, so long as the time-frame of the impact involves the 60s and beyond in the category of popular music.

            1. shazwellyn profile image84
              shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this
    2. shazwellyn profile image84
      shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Yep.. see my  like comments on thinking music genre like a tree... x

  19. prettydarkhorse profile image64
    prettydarkhorseposted 7 years ago

    Papa Elvis, Led Zep and Rolling Stones

  20. topgunjager profile image60
    topgunjagerposted 7 years ago

    I'm sure it was that group of cavemen who invented the drmus=)

  21. topgunjager profile image60
    topgunjagerposted 7 years ago

    No seriously, I think it's lil kim, she inspired all the whoress running around in the world today, she made being a biznatch seem cool=)

  22. profile image0
    zampanoposted 7 years ago

    Minor influencies are important also.
    King crimson
    Gentle giant
    Yes
    Pink floyd
    Genesis

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3BFuxBayxg

    1. tony0724 profile image60
      tony0724posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Nice choice on Gentle Giant they had to be one of the most Interesting prog/rock groups ever !

    2. shazwellyn profile image84
      shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Genesis...ummm... Peter Gabriel!

      1. Uninvited Writer profile image81
        Uninvited Writerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Definitely Peter Gabriel...

        1. shazwellyn profile image84
          shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          well.. he was the original lead singer in Genesis! hehehe x

          1. Uninvited Writer profile image81
            Uninvited Writerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            But he has done so much more since. He has influenced so many musicians and he continues to help up and coming musicians.

            1. shazwellyn profile image84
              shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

              Absolutely... what with 'Real World' music.  WOMAD. bringing traditional music from all over the world to the masses.  He lives near me... has a studio outside of Bath x

  23. sannyasinman profile image59
    sannyasinmanposted 7 years ago

    No need to look very far, its the Scousers of course.
    Never heard of them? Try the lads from Liverpool . . .otherwise known as
    . The Beatles.

    1. rebekahELLE profile image91
      rebekahELLEposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      a band? Beatles, I agree. they have so many different styles that have influenced music. Woody Guthrie, although he's not a band also was a huge influence to music.

      1. shazwellyn profile image84
        shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Guthrie influenced Joe Strummer of the Clash!!! This is great guys!

  24. Pr0metheus profile image60
    Pr0metheusposted 7 years ago

    Beatles

    Pink Floyd

    Radiohead

    Tool

    Tiesto

    Deadmau5

    Britney Spears (Yea, she was influential, as much as her music sucks.

    Madonna

    Michael Jackson

    Garth Brooks

    Rage Against the Machine

    Deftones

    Elvis

    2Pac

    Tech N9ne

    Biggie Smalls

    Hell, there's a ton more.  They all have huge influences on music in their own genre (and some create new genres), and contribute to music as a whole.

    1. theageofcake profile image75
      theageofcakeposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Good, comprehensive list.  I would add:

      N.W.A.

      Diana Ross

      U2

      The Beach Boys

      The Velvet Underground

      (the latter two had a huge influence on indie rock - I'd say its certainly comparable to the Beatles' effect on mainstream pop)

    2. shazwellyn profile image84
      shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      RADIOHEAD .. KEWL!  I met Thom Yorke, but that is another story!  Suprised no one has mentioned the Smiths tho!

      1. tony0724 profile image60
        tony0724posted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Uhhh , UnInvited writer did .

      2. Sufidreamer profile image81
        Sufidreamerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Radiohead - Thom Yorke refused to allow The Pixies to open for Radiohead and insisted on playing before them. smile

        Has anybody mentioned Bowie, yet? Or Johnny Cash?

        1. shazwellyn profile image84
          shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Early Bowie (after he was David Jones - remember ha ha ha he he he... Im a laughing gnome) ziggy stardust etc - inspired 'the new romantic' generation, especially with the fashion and male makeup.  Johnny cash was more a rebel tho.  Much of the style was similar to the day, I wouldnt say he inspired great change in music.. except for the hue and cry over the prison sessions. x
          p.s. kudos to R/head.. didnt know the pixie fact

          1. Sufidreamer profile image81
            Sufidreamerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            I'm just an old punk - Cash was the first punk...

            ...unless you count Mozart hmm

            Got to say Hawkwind, but that is only because they were the first to have naked Amazonian women dancing on the stage...and they gave Lemmy his break big_smile

            1. shazwellyn profile image84
              shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

              Od to memories of yesteryear, eh?! lol

              1. Sufidreamer profile image81
                Sufidreamerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

                Not quite - I am too young and missed out on all the good hippy stuff sad

                Still, I didn't completely miss out on seeing a bunch of big painted girls prance about on stage. There was always Poison...lol

                1. shazwellyn profile image84
                  shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

                  I live in Glastonbury, believe me this is a normal occurrance!  What about Can as an influence?  Can were an experimental rock band formed in West Germany in 1968. One of the first "krautrock" groups, they rejected American influences and incorporated strong minimalist and world music elements into their often psychedelic music.
                  Major artists working in the post-punk genre such as The Fall, Public Image Ltd., Siouxsie & the Banshees, Joy Division and other acts like David Bowie, Talking Heads, The Stone Roses and Primal Scream have cited Can as an influence. Brian Eno made a short film in tribute to Can, while John Frusciante of the Red Hot Chili Peppers appeared at the Echo Awards ceremony, at which Can were awarded the most prestigious music award in Germany,[11] to pay tribute to guitarist Michael Karoli.


                  Can constructed their music largely through free improvisation and editing, which bassist Holger Czukay referred to as "instant compositions".[1] They had only occasional commercial success, with singles such as "Spoon" and "I Want More" reaching national singles charts. However, through albums such as Tago Mago (1971) and Ege Bamyasi (1972), the band exerted a considerable influence on avant-garde, experimental, underground, ambient, new wave and electronic music.[2

                  1. Sufidreamer profile image81
                    Sufidreamerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

                    Lucky you - I have only been there twice (beautiful place) and to the festival once, although it was when Bowie and Nine Inch Nails played, so all was well with the world smile

                    I have heard of Can, but never heard anything by them, so will have to check them out.

                    You are giving me too much homework, Miss sad

  25. Uninvited Writer profile image81
    Uninvited Writerposted 7 years ago

    Depeche Mode was a major influence in the 80s, and the Smiths.

    1. tony0724 profile image60
      tony0724posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I do love the Smiths ! By the way Morrissey collapsed on stage In London yesterday . But It looks like he will be OK though .

      1. Uninvited Writer profile image81
        Uninvited Writerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I read that on wossy's Twitter yesterday. Glad to hear he is okay; he's my favorite manic depressive big_smile

        1. tony0724 profile image60
          tony0724posted 7 years ago in reply to this

          LOL ! Oh cmon Morrisseys an optimist ! big_smile

    2. shazwellyn profile image84
      shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      CONGRATULATIONS...I wondered how long it would be before someone mentioned the Smiths.  Depeche Mode was influenced by Kraftwerk and  Joy Division, although DM brought this music to the mainstream x

  26. profile image0
    Rick Marlowposted 7 years ago

    How about Ernest tubbs?

  27. profile image0
    Rick Marlowposted 7 years ago

    Hey guys,seriously,how about some of the old black rythmn and blues guitarists of the 30`s and 40`s like PINK ANDERSON from which PINK FLOYD took their name?

    1. shazwellyn profile image84
      shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Yep babes... I mentioned Paul Robeson! x

    2. theageofcake profile image75
      theageofcakeposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I've got one for you, Rick.  Robert Johnson.

      Not only was he influential musically - he also added an interesting element to music legend.  He's said to be the first alleged victim of the "27" curse. 

      Its often considered a kind a rite of passage for the musically brilliant to die at the age of 27 - Robert Johnson, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Jim Morrison, Kurt Cobain, and at least a dozen others, are said to be members of this elite "club." 

      But beyond that cheesy bit of supernatural sensationalism, some of Johnson's recordings are absolutely heartbreaking.

      1. shazwellyn profile image84
        shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Mark Bolan, I believe.  Nick Drake died in his 27th year! x

        1. theageofcake profile image75
          theageofcakeposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Nick Drake was 26.  Bolan was 29.  Close, but no cigar.

          1. shazwellyn profile image84
            shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            bugger... oh well, it was an average!  I was about to mention R Johnson, but you beat me to it! hehehe x

            1. theageofcake profile image75
              theageofcakeposted 7 years ago in reply to this

              Eh, its an honest mistake.

              Hey, I just realized that John Bonham and Keith Moon both died at 32.  We should refer to them as the 32 dead drummers club, since they were both fiercely gifted and died young. 

              2 isn't enough though.  If only we could go back in time and kill Neil Peart and Danny Carey at 32 - that way they would be arbitrarily greater than all other drummers in existence!  Yeah!

              1. shazwellyn profile image84
                shazwellynposted 7 years ago in reply to this

                LMFAO Great one, mate!

      2. rebekahELLE profile image91
        rebekahELLEposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        wow, nice to hear his name. I used to listen to him a lot.
        and yes, he did influence so many musicians and music itself.

  28. Cheri Schultz profile image66
    Cheri Schultzposted 7 years ago

    Bon Jovi

  29. shazwellyn profile image84
    shazwellynposted 7 years ago

    John William "Trane" Coltrane (September 23, 1926 – July 17, 1967[1]) was an American jazz saxophonist and composer.

    Working in the bebop and hard bop idioms early in his career, Coltrane helped pioneer the use of modes in jazz and later was at the forefront of free jazz. He was astonishingly prolific: he made about fifty recordings as a leader during his recording career, and appeared as a sideman on many other albums, notably with trumpeter Miles Davis and pianist Thelonious Monk. As his career progressed, Coltrane's music took on an increasingly spiritual dimension. His second wife was pianist Alice Coltrane, and their son Ravi Coltrane is also a saxophonist.

    He influenced innumerable musicians, and remains one of the most significant tenor saxophonists in jazz history. He received many awards, among them a posthumous Special Citation from the Pulitzer Prize Board in 2007 for his "masterful improvisation, supreme musicianship and iconic centrality to the history of jazz."

  30. Valerie F profile image61
    Valerie Fposted 7 years ago

    The Les Paul trio.

  31. shazwellyn profile image84
    shazwellynposted 7 years ago

    the Monks are often referenced as forerunners of the later punk movement

    At the beginning of 1965, Dave Day and Roger Johnston, on a whim, got their heads shaved into monks' tonsures. The rest of the band followed their lead, and to complete the image, the band took to wearing a uniform - all black, sometimes in cassocks, with nooses worn as neckties. Eddie Shaw later claimed in his band autobiography Black Monk Time that the nooses were symbolic of the metaphorical nooses that all humanity wear. His explanation exhibited a literal translation of gallows humor. The same attitude seems to be exhibited by the blunt lyrics of the band. Of course the brazen attitude toward sensitive subjects was not well met. They received confused audience reactions at concerts: One attendee attempted to strangle Gary Burger at a show in Hamburg, presumably for perceived blasphemy.
    Influence
    Artists to have acknowledged the Monks as an influence include The White Stripes, Henry Rollins, the Beastie Boys and Jello Biafra of the Dead Kennedys, as well as The Fall. The latter covered both "I Hate You" and "Oh, How to Do Now" on their 1990 album Extricate (under the titles "Black Monk Theme Part I" and "Black Monk Theme Part II", respectively), as well as the song "Shut Up!" on their 1994 album Middle Class Revolt. The Fall have also covered "Higgledy-Piggledy" for the Monks tribute CD Silver Monk Time. The White Stripes named The Monks as one of their key influences, noting that "their melodies were pop destructive

  32. Sufidreamer profile image81
    Sufidreamerposted 7 years ago

    Going to check the Monks out - they sound very interesting.

    Thanks for the tip smile

  33. shazwellyn profile image84
    shazwellynposted 7 years ago

    The first has to be... drum roll......

    Bach!

    1. Sufidreamer profile image81
      Sufidreamerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Sebastian?!? hmm

  34. Cheeky Girl profile image87
    Cheeky Girlposted 7 years ago

    I nominate The beatles, Abba and U2. And for some darn reason I have a yen for Kenny Rogers and The Bee Gees. But that's just me! : ) When I was a kid, I had to endure the Carpenters being played constantly by my grand parents. Now I love em! If it moves me enough, yes, I can come to like that music...

 
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