Cornhole Games Can Bring About Family Bonding

Every family in America has long-standing issues and internal conflicts that have never been resolved. This is especially true for larger families, and it's probably totally unrealistic to expect everyone to get along with each other all the time. But there are some things that a family can do together in an attempt to get past differences, even if only for a short amount of time.  There are positive steps that folks can try to take to heal old wounds and just "get over it".

One thing that a family can do to improve relationships and mend fences is to compete against each other in a laid-back, comfortable, and friendly setting. A family game or series of backyard games has the power to rip down walls caused by anger, jealousy, or resentment. You could find that even the most distant of family members will become engaged in very surprising ways.  Call me naive but I've seen it work time and time again.

An excellent example of a game that promotes family bonding is cornhole. In case the concept is brand new to you, cornhole is very similar to horseshoes, the primary difference being that you throw corn hole bags through a hole in a wood board instead of shoes at a metal spike. Depending on what section of the country you live in, it could also be called washers or corn toss.  Now before you start laughing hear me out on this one.

Though it might initially seem like a rather dull and idiotic game, cornhole is actually pretty exciting. It can transform a snoozer of a get-together into an electrifying party in no time. A tightly contested game of cornhole is always especially interesting to watch and take part in, particularly when it results in several overtime rounds.  I've seen games that aroused so much interest that you'd think the Superbowl was on TV.

An especially good way to make it an inclusive event is to hold a family-wide cornhole tournament instead of just a game or two. This shows to everyone in attendance that they are important and valued. Involving everyone in this manner tends to lead to a more fun and joyful atmosphere.

Another positive by-product of putting on a cornhole tournament is that all of your guests will be inclined to hang around until the final game to see who the winner ultimately is. This ensures that folks won't cut out early on your backyard gathering. If you can manage to get everyone to stick around for a good length of time then you can legitimately call the get-together a major success.

One final benefit of playing cornhole games with family and friends is that it doesn't necessarily require any amount of athleticism or skill. This is important because it levels the playing field and allows for the possibility that every single person has a realistic chance of winning. Nothing kills the mood of a gathering quicker than staging a game or competition that clearly favors one or two highly skilled people.

In summation, if you're having a huge family gathering at your home then consider making cornhole sets available for play in the backyard or wherever there's a long stretch of grass. When you take into consideration how a friendly game can ease tensions and promote camaraderie, playing cornhole games at your party could be the best possible decision you can make. Odds are, everyone will have a wonderful time. And maybe, just maybe, a fresh round of dialogue will open up between people who've had issues with each other for a long, long time.

Edit:  I've had a few people question this information.  There seems to be this attitude that backyard games have no chance of fixing deep-rooted family issues and that my ideas are pretty naive.  Well, call me a hopeless dreamer but I'm one of those people that thinks that anything is possible.  I do think that if you can just bring two people together who have issues and somehow get them to communicate with each other that magical things can happen.  Communication is the key, and if it takes something as silly as a cornhole game to instigate such an exchange then so be it.  I'm worried more about the ends and not the means.  Cornhole may not be a miracle-maker but if it can get the conversation going then that's a darn good start.

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