Family Tree: William Benedict II and Wife wed in 1552

Family Tree: William Benedict II and Wife wed in 1552 in Nottinghamshire, England

What will you find in this hub?

William Benedict II is one of my direct ancestors. The year of his birth, the year 1521, precedes the year of my birth by 437 years. He is my multiple great grandfather.

In this hub, you will find:

* Basic information about his birth, spouse, children, death, and other basic information. This is in the form of an interview.

* Information about his life from a variety of sources that will help fill in the blanks.

* A poem I wrote about William Benedict II.

Welcome to this hub!


William Benedict II tree
William Benedict II tree | Source

Family Tree: William Benedict II and Wife wed in 1552 in Nottinghamshire, England

Question and Answers:

Interviewer: What is your name?

William Benedict II: My name is William Benedict II.

Interviewer: When and where were you born?

William Benedict II: I was born in 1521 in Nottinghamshire, England.


The interview continues ...

Interviewer: Who were your parents?

William Benedict II: My father’s name was William Benedict I.

[My mother’s name is unknown.] As you have probably noticed, I was named after my father.

Interviewer: Did you have brothers or sisters? If so, how many?

William Benedict II: I was an only son. My father was also an only son.

[It is not known if there were daughters; however, if this source was true, he was an only son.]

Source: “Catalogue of the Names of the Early Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut”

Interviewer: Who did you marry?

William Benedict II: (Name unknown)

Interviewer: What can you tell us about her?

William Benedict II: She was born about 1525 in Nottingham, England.

Interviewer: When and where did you marry?

William Benedict II: We married in 1552 - probably in Nottingham, England.

Interviewer: What was your job?

William Benedict II: (Unknown information.)

Interviewer: Did you have any children?

William Benedict II: Yes. We had one son only. He was born about a year after we married in Nottinghamshire, England. We named him after me. His name was William Benedict III.

Interviewer: Did you have any other children?

William Benedict II: [It is not known if there were daughters; however, if this source was true, he was an only son.]

Source: “Catalogue of the Names of the Early Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut”

It is not known where or what year William Benedict II died.


William Benedict II chart
William Benedict II chart | Source

From “Catalogue of the Names of the Early Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut”

From “Catalogue of the Names of the Early Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut,” the following is stated:

“BENEDICT, WILLIAM, in 1500, son WILLIAM, son WILLIAM, son THOMAS and MARY, all born in England. Tradition says the first William resided in Nottinghamshire, England about A.D., 1500, and was an only son, and he had an only son William, who resided in the same shire. This second William had also an only son William, in Nottinghamshire, who also had an only son Thomas, who was born in England, in 1617. He married Mary Bridgum, and was by trade a weaver. ... His father [William IV] married a second wife, Mrs. Bridgum (a widow), whose daughter Mary, married Thomas when of age, [1638]. Thomas Benedict and Mary came to Massachusetts, in the same vessel, and were soon after married. ...”


From: “History of Fairfield County, Connecticut, with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of its Prominent Men and Pioneers.”

From: “History of Fairfield County, Connecticut, with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of its Prominent Men and Pioneers.” Compiled under the supervision of D. Hamilton Hurd. Philadelphia: J.W. Lewis & Co.,1881.

“From a period dating back toat least 1500, it is said that the first son of theBenedict family has been christened Thomas, and the first American progenitor, Thomas, was the only son for three successive generations, and transplanted the name from old to New England. He was born in 1617, of reported Huguenot ancestry, and emigrated from England in 1638, marrying,shortly after his arrival, Mary Bridgum, his sister-in-law [should read step-sister] who came over in the same vessel with him. … “


From “The Genealogy of the Benedicts in America.”

From “The Genealogy of the Benedicts in America.” By Henry Marvin Benedict, Compiler of a Contribution to the Stafford Genealogy,Resident Member of the Albany Institute, and of the New York Genealogical andBiographical Society. Albany: Joel Munsell, 82 State Street, 1870


Thomas Benedict

“Among those Englishmen who went into voluntary exile, rather than endure the cruelties and oppressions of Stuarts in the State and Lauds in the Church, was Thomas Benedict, of Nottinghamshire. There is reason to suppose that his own remote ancestor hadmade England his refuge from religious persecution on the Continent. There was a tradition in his family which ran, that anciently they resided in the silk manufacturing district of France and were of Latin origin; that, Huguenot persecutions arising, they fled toGermany, and, thence, by way of Holland to England. …”


Poetry and Prose by Debbie Dunn
Poetry and Prose by Debbie Dunn | Source

A Poem about William Benedict II

Just like your father,

you are my grandfather

many times over minus one.

With him, I could add one more ‘great’

to his name than I can yours.

Nevertheless, I’m sure

you were a great man.

And as a great man,

I am reaching out to you,

my many times over grandfather

to ask of you

what you would teach me

if your many times over granddaughter,

namely me,

was standing before you?

I only know a few dry facts

such as you were born, lived, and died

in Nottinghamshire, England.

That was true of your son as well.

As for your father,

I only know for sure,

he was born in England.

So Grandfather Benedict dear,

what can you teach me, please?

As if from far away,

a distant voice can be heard

sending his wisdom and knowing

in my direction.

Here is what I think I heard.

“Granddaughter, Dear,

as the second William Benedict

behind my father,

it was my duty to find

a goodly wife.

As the only son

born to my father and mother,

it was my duty alone

to carry on the Benedict name.

I would give different words of wisdom

to your two brothers

as it was their sole duty and right

to carry on your father’s surname

into future generations.

Since you, my dear,

chose to only be an aunt and not a mother,

it matters not to your direct family line.

It would only matter to some other man’s

family line had you made a different choice.

So although history has forgotten

or never recorded the name of my wife,

it matters not to the family line.

What was of vital importance

was that she was healthy enough

to bring a son to full term

so that he could go on

to perpetuate the Benedict family line

into future generations.

That is part of why

whether or not I ever had daughters

is of no consequence to the Benedict family line.

As for me,

once my son was born,

I needed to stay alive long enough

to help raise and support my son

so that he could grow up

and carry on the Benedict family line.

So know that I did just that.

I fulfilled my duty as a son,

as a husband,

and as a father and grandfather.

His words come to an end; however,

the message they imply

makes me ponder the following truths.

If we are each a jigsaw puzzle piece

in a giant jigsaw puzzle,

then William Benedict II

fulfilling his duty as he perceived it to be

is of vital importance to me.

After all,

if he had not found

just the wife that he did

or if he did not have the son

that he had

who went on to find just the wife

that he did

and had at least one son

who carried this tradition forward,

then if all that did not happen,

then me, myself, and I

as I know myself to be,

would not be here.

So I thank you

Grandfather William Benedict II

that you found the goodly wife

that you found

and had the good son

that you had

so that over 400 years later,

me, myself, and I

could also exist as well.

Rest in peace,

Grandfather dear.

You performed your duty

better than you ever

could have imagined.

Thanks to you

my siblings, plus

many, many of my close

and distant cousins

exist on this earth as well.


More by this Author


4 comments

jacqui2011 profile image

jacqui2011 5 years ago from Leicester, United Kingdom

How very interesting to find out that you are directly related to William Benedict II. A lot of research was worth it to know your history and family roots. Voted up and interesting.


Ask_DJ_Lyons profile image

Ask_DJ_Lyons 5 years ago from Mosheim, Tennessee Author

Thank you, jacqui2011, for your comment. Are you related to him as well? That would be fun if you turned out to be my distant cousin.

Have a lovely day,

Debbie


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 5 years ago from Wales

Hi Debbie,

What an interesting hub and great poem, Your ovious hard work on this one has certainly paid off.

Dai is researching his family tree,very slowly at the moment.

It is very time consuming and beacause he works six days a week he does not have enough free time.

I know quite a few retired people who are tracing their family tree and I can understan why they have waited until their retirement before embarking on this venture.

I will show this hub to Dai,I'm sure that he will find it very interesting.

So up, up and away here Debbie and looking forward to many more by you.

Take care

Eiddwen.


Ask_DJ_Lyons profile image

Ask_DJ_Lyons 5 years ago from Mosheim, Tennessee Author

Eiddwen,

Thank you so much. I wish Dai all the best wish his search. It is indeed time-consuming; however, I find it rather fascinating.

I hope you both are having a lovely day,

Debbie

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