Five No Nonsense Cartoons for Young Children

Do you know what your child is watching?

Television is such a powerful tool that could affect how young children understand life and learn to reason out with it. With the boom of media productions and the business of different entertainment genres in the film and TV programming industry, it could not be denied that there are already so many programs that have been released in media that are supposed to entertain children.

The creation of cartoons has set out a pattern of animation that used to be specifically directed to children. However, the expansion of the type of audiences that the cartoon or animation industry serves resulted to the creation of different cartoons that discuss different issues that are at some point not suitable for young children anymore.

Observing this, my husband and I tried to look for better cartoons that we could let our young son at seven years of age could watch that does not involve violence or anything that could spur his aggression. Among the cartoons we found best are the following [which we both have grown alongside with]:

Recess is the 1990 cartoon produced by Disney that characterizes the being of five friends who study in a public school in third street. Presenting all their adventures in a fun way, this cartoon explains different issues in the school that children may be involved in. It presents problems and presents solutions as well in a way that would stir up the thinking of the young child who is still learning how to socialize with peers as well as with adults.

Another cartoon from the 1990s, Captain Planet and the Planeteers is an animated presentation of how five youngsters join hands with captain planet and Gaya [Mother Earth] to save the environment from devastation. Every end of the episode, the program provides useful tips that children could use to improve the way they take care of the environment themselves.

Hey Arnold, from Nickelodeon, is somewhat a response to Disney's Recess, only that this one has its setting in a busy city where children most likely live in at present. Indicating a discussion on what issues children face, Arnold [the main character] is shown here as a model child who intends to use his mind first as always to be able to help others or decide on matters he needs to face.

As Told by Ginger is another production of Nickelodeon which discusses more mature issues that middle school students experience. Relatively, dealing with matters lightly, this cartoon presents a remarkable definition of what school and social life would be like for middle schoolers and how they would be able to overcome such stumbling points and successfully pass through this stage of their lives.

The latest, and perhaps the most animatedly exciting of all these five cartoons is Phineas and Ferb. Although not so much of a reality, it creates a motivating pattern for youngsters to create more and explore their capabilities of doing matters beyond their imagination. This cartoon also provides a strong definition on how friends and brothers and sisters actually have to treat each other with dignity and respect.

Given a list of these five cartoons, it could be noted how they are most likely engaged in providing a glimpse of reality to the children or at least spurring both their creativity and reasoning to face real challenges in life. In a way, instead of simply entertaining, these cartoons provide genuine lessons that the children themselves could use as they grow older.

Yes, every minute our children spend in front of the television set should be considered precious and should not be taken for granted. Knowing what our young children watch is part of our responsibility and should not be taken lightly. Whatever they watch sticks into their minds like glue, hence honing their attitudes with a great deal. The cartoons suggested above are just a few of the many good programs that young children could watch today. If you have anymore suggestions, please feel free to comment :)


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