Great English Cider.


Cider takes on the characteristics of the apples used in their creation, the options for making a good cider apple is wide but the options for a great cider depends on other factors. The experience of the brewer, the type of soil it is grown in and the time of season that they are picked all contribute to creating a great English Cider. Although Cider does not suffer from the same level of snobbery and elitism that Wine production encourages, there are many who take the creation of a great cider very seriously.

There are many different styles of English Cider and most people still refer to cider as been produced using apples only. To call a drink a pear cider is technically false as it should be classed as a Perry, any Cider's produced with Berries should really be called a fruit wine rather than a Cider. Since the year 2000, the lines between labels has become blurred with a resurgence in drinking these brews as a refreshing summer drink over ice.



Apple's the essential ingredient for Great English Cider.
Apple's the essential ingredient for Great English Cider. | Source


The production of Cider is not a purely English tradition, many parts of the world brew Cider and have many different variations on the recipe. Regions of France which have had a strong connection with England ,have some very palatable ciders and are brewed in a similar fashion. Nordic countries such as Sweden and Germany have very well known brands of cider which appeal to markets outside of their domestic audience. There are many variations throughout the world and each have their own distinct flavours.

The production of Cider in England and many of the European nations is linked to Beer production through the ages. In the medieval period it was safer to drink Cider and Beer, than chance your health on the local water supplies of your settlement. Today some research concludes that Cider is healthier for your body, than the Apples that create the cider. Of course this is under the assumption you are drinking the traditional cider in moderation, not to excess!


Rattler Cider


Rattler Cider is a refreshing and traditional Cornish Cider brewed at the St Austell brewery quite close to the site of the Eden Project tourist attraction. The drink is sold in bottles throughout the United Kingdom but if you are lucky enough to either visit or live in Cornwall you are in for a treat.

In a few local pub chains they sell the Rattler English Cider on draft Serving the Cider from the barrel allows you to experience a different taste to drinking from the bottle and serving it chilled. The difference in the taste is great, as serving most traditional English Cider's too cold dampens the taste buds on your tongue. Rattler Cider is extremely popular with younger drinkers who usually drink bottled beer, in the Summer time many drinkers switch over to the brand as it is so refreshing.

Rattler Cider is an expensive Cider to drink but it is worth the extra expenditure, the best time to drink Rattler Cider is when having a nice BBQ on a hot summer's day. After a couple of bottles of these fine Cider's and a healthy dose of Cornish fresh air, you will have no problem sleeping at night time.




Cider is usually of a higher alcoholic value than Beer, it is not uncommon to see Cider with an alcohol by volume of 4.5 % which is the same gravity as a premium Bitter. Cider is a drink which is very palatable and in many ways feels like you are drinking a soft drink, for the unaware this is a potential pitfall to drinking Cider as you forget how strong the drink is. Many a social drinker has been undone by have one to many Cider's and believing he has not drank that much, only to find him feeling quite unwell upon walking home.

The best Cider to drink is the local Cider especially the traditional recipe Cider's which are not designed for travelling long distances or been kept for ages. The Sulphate's used to preserve the drink can give the drink a very peculiar after taste and detract from the enjoyment of the drink. Home brewed Cider tastes great but be warned it's Alcoholic levels are usually a lot higher than the Cider's sold in Pub's and Shop's.


A Cider pressing wheel, usually powered by a Horse.
A Cider pressing wheel, usually powered by a Horse. | Source

More by this Author


Comments 4 comments

Asp52 profile image

Asp52 3 years ago from England Author

Cheers :)


tastiger04 profile image

tastiger04 3 years ago

I do like my cider :) thanks for the info, voted up


Asp52 profile image

Asp52 3 years ago from England Author

Thanks for reading EricDierker


Ericdierker profile image

Ericdierker 3 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

Quite interesting, thank you.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working