Recipe: Chinese Instant Noodle Aglio e Olio

One of my favourite dishes when I go to an "Italian" restaurant in Singapore is Aglio Olio (or perhaps, more accurately, according to my quick Google Search, Aglio e Olio). The dish is simplicity itself - garlic (aglio), hot chilli pepper and herbs sauteed in olive (olio) oil and added to pasta.

The recipe below is my own quick-and-easy version combining elements of aglio e olio with a common dish served here, chinese dry-tossed (konlo) wonton noodles. To speed up preparation time, I use instant noodles.

Chinese Instant Noodle Aglio e Olio

Serves One

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 packet instant noodles (if you buy the type that comes with seasoning, don't use the seasoning)
  • Oil
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 1 red chilli, finely sliced
  • 3 pieces French Beans, finely sliced
  • Light soya sauce, to taste
  • A sprinkle of Italian mixed herbs
  • Fish sauce (optional)
  • Chilli Oil (optional)

METHOD

1. Bring a pot of water to the boil. Cook instant noodles, and drain. Put aside.

2. Heat oil, then sautee red chilli and garlic. Add in French beans, and sprinkle the mixed herbs over it. Fry till french beans is cooked, but still crunchy.

3. Turn off the heat. Then add soya sauce to taste (I usually put add in about 1 tablespoon of soya sauce).

4. Add the cooked instant noodles to the pan and toss. It's now ready to serve.

Note: I like my noodles this way, with just a hint of soya sauce. However, for those who like it more flavourful, I usually add in fish sauce. Or, for a spicier kick, add chilli oil.

Ever wondered who invented instant noodles?

Instant noodles is such a common product, but have you ever thought about who invented it, and why this cheap, easy-to-cook product was invented?

The process of frying noodles in order to preserve it has in fact existed for centuries in China. But it was post WWII Japan with its acute food shortages which inspired Momofuko Ando to perfect the process, thus inventing the world's first instant noodle product. Instant noodles are made by steam-cooking the dough, then frying or drying the noodles using hot air.

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