Baking Powder: Single Acting and Double Acting. How To Make Your Own Gluten Free.

Baking Powder: Single Acting and Double Acting. Make Your Own Gluten Free.
Baking Powder: Single Acting and Double Acting. Make Your Own Gluten Free. | Source

Double Acting Baking Powder

Double Acting Baking Powder
Double Acting Baking Powder | Source

Single Acting and Double Acting What Is The Difference? How to make homemade gluten free baking power.

Baking powder contains sodium bicarbonate, but it includes the acidifying agent already (cream of tartar), and also a drying agent (starch). Baking powder is available as the single-acting baking powder and as a double-acting baking powder.

Single-acting powders are activated by moisture, so you must bake recipes which include this product immediately after mixing.

Double-acting powders react in two phases and can stand for a while before baking. With double-acting powder, some gas is released at room temperature when the powder is added to the dough, but the majority of the gas is released after the temperature of the dough is heated. Most baking powders you buy in the stores are double acting

Make Your Own.

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Single Acting Baking Powder

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Single Acting Gluten Free Baking Powder Recipe

The recipe off my cream of tartar can.

2 Tablespoons of cream of tartar

1 Tablespoon of baking soda

1 Tablespoon of cornstarch

Combine ingredients: store in airtight container until needed. Makes 1/4 cup. This is gluten free baking powder.


You can still buy single acting baking powder. Single acting is used in some old recipes and bakers usually like single acting.

Cream of Tarter

Cream of tartar is made from the residue of grapes.Cream of tartar is not only used for making gluten-free baking powder. It's often used to stiffen egg whites. It can be turned into a paste to clean cookware.

Baking Powder: Single Acting and Double Acting
Baking Powder: Single Acting and Double Acting | Source

How To Check Your Baking Powder .

To check to see if your baking powder is still good. Stir 1 teaspoon into one-third cup hot water. Right away there will be very strong bubbling. If not bubbling then it's no longer any good. The homemade baking powder will fizz as soon as added to the liquid. Be sure to preheat the oven and having baking pans ready before mixing the batter. Mix quickly and put in the oven right away for homemade powder.

The slightly bad baking powder is indicated when the powder contains lumps; a hard caked condition is no good at all.

Aluminum Free Baking Powders

Source
Source

Double Acting Baking Powder ingredients

Baking powders with and without aluminum compounds.Some cooks prefer not to use baking powder with aluminum because they think it gives food a metallic taste. Which is usually in double acting baking powder.

Double Acting Baking Powder Ingredients: Corn Starch, Bicarbonate of Soda, Sodium Aluminum Sulfate, Acid Phosphate of Calcium.

You can find some double acting without Sodium Aluminum sulfate. Here are some examples.

Cocoa Indians

FROM AN OLD COOKBOOK: Modern encyclopedia of cooking

2/3 cups golden raisins

1 cup all-purpose flour

1/4 tsp. double acting baking powder or 1/3 tsp. single acting baking powder

3/8 tsp. salt

1/4 cup cocoa

1/2 cup soft butter plus 2 tbsp or margarine

1 cup sugar

2 eggs

1/4 cup

milk

1/2 tsp vanilla

Grease a 7 X 11 X 1 1/2-inch pan.

Start the oven 10 min before baking; set to moderate ( 350 F). Plump raisins,

Sift flour, measure, resift 3 times with next 3 ingredients. (You do not have to shift they will still be good, but the old recipes say to shift)

Cream butter in a 3 qt mixing bowl until soft and shiny, add sugar in 2 portions, creaming well.

Beat in eggs, one at a time until fluffy, then stir in vanilla.

Now add flour mixture and milk alternately in 2 or 3 portions, beating until smooth after each.

Stir in raisians be sure raisians are cool.

Spread batter in pan to uniform thickness.

Bake 23 to 25 min until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean.

How To Plump Raisins and Currants:

Wash raisins and turn into a colander. Cover, place over boiling water and let steam for 5 min. Cool.

or

Place raisins in the microwave to plump, use a microwave safe bowl, add the tablespoon of water, cover with paper towel, heat on high for 2 minutes, let sit a bit and then drain and use. Cool

Add a little whip cream and few nuts to the top, delicious.

Old Photo from Cookbook
Old Photo from Cookbook | Source
Mixing
Mixing | Source
Adding To Pan
Adding To Pan | Source
All Done
All Done

Rate This Recipe COCOA INDIANS

4.5 stars from 6 ratings of COCOA INDIANS

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Copyright © 2015 moonlakehubpage.com

Baking Powder: Single Acting and Double Acting

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Comments 71 comments

Ronna Pennington profile image

Ronna Pennington 2 months ago from Arkansas

Thank you SO much for offering all this useful knowledge in one place! I needed to know how to do gluten-free and the tips about how to test are great too!


moonlake profile image

moonlake 19 months ago from America Author

pstraubie48, thank you for stopping by glad you liked the hub and shared it.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 19 months ago from sunny Florida

How cool is this. I never even thought of making my own but now I will. I have all the ingredients so may just give it a try today.

Thanks for sharing.

Angels are on the way to you Voted up+++ and shared and pinned ps


moonlake profile image

moonlake 2 years ago from America Author

ThatMommyBlogger, thank you for stopping by I appreciate it.


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moonlake 2 years ago from America Author

AudreyHowitt, I'm glad it's helpful. Thank you for stopping by.


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moonlake 2 years ago from America Author

PegCole17, thank you for stopping by and for the pin. Cpcoa Indians are good.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 2 years ago from America Author

Peggy W, thank you for stopping by and I appreciate the tweeting and Google+


moonlake profile image

moonlake 2 years ago from America Author

Jackie Lynnley, thanks so much for stopping by. Hubbie's in bed and I'm trying to catch up on comments.


ThatMommyBlogger profile image

ThatMommyBlogger 2 years ago from The Midwest

Very interesting hub. We follow a primarily gluten-free diet.


AudreyHowitt profile image

AudreyHowitt 2 years ago from California

So useful for us gluten free babies--Thank you!!


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 2 years ago from Dallas, Texas

Those Cocoa Indians look wonderful! I've never made my own baking powder but it sounds pretty easy. I already have all the ingredients if I ever need to try. Thanks so much for the instructions and for the great recipe. Pinning that scrumptious picture to my Food Ideas board.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 2 years ago from Houston, Texas

I am going to share further by tweeting and also G+ing this informative hub. Happy to do so. :)


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 2 years ago from The Beautiful South

I have all these ingredient and will give it a try; thank you!


moonlake profile image

moonlake 2 years ago from America Author

mariexotoni, Thank you so much for stopping by. I will have to head over to your healthy pancake article.


mariexotoni profile image

mariexotoni 2 years ago

This article is awesome. I think I am going to make a link to it in my healthy pancake article. Wasn't exactly sure if baking soda was gluten-free or not. Thanks for sharing this!


moonlake profile image

moonlake 2 years ago from America Author

Jeannieinabottle, Thank you for stopping by and leaving a comment. Funny about your cobler I have also made some mistakes like that in our 51 years of marriage.


Jeannieinabottle profile image

Jeannieinabottle 2 years ago from Baltimore, MD

I was wondered where cream of tartar came from. Also, I used to think baking powder and baking soda were the same thing. I learned I was wrong the hard way one time when I made cherry cobler. It was a sad day for me and my cherry cobler. Thanks for sharing this useful information!


moonlake profile image

moonlake 2 years ago from America Author

CraftytotheCore, Thank you and thanks so much for stopping by.


CraftytotheCore profile image

CraftytotheCore 2 years ago

This is an excellent article and should get a lot of viewers considering the popularity of gluten free. I'm also gluten free now too.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 2 years ago from America Author

DeborahNeyens, Thanks for stopping by I appreciate it. Glad to hear my hub answered some of your questions.


DeborahNeyens profile image

DeborahNeyens 2 years ago from Iowa

I don't bake often but just the other day I made some banana bread and got to thinking about baking powder and what it actually was and did. This answered a lot of my questions.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 2 years ago from America Author

AudreyHowitt, Thank you for coming by glad you liked the hub.


AudreyHowitt profile image

AudreyHowitt 2 years ago from California

This is wonderful--I have been wondering how to deaal wwith this part of my gluten free diet!


DDE profile image

DDE 2 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

Great idea to make your own and this recipe explained to the point the step by step process sounds a great experiment.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 3 years ago from America Author

Insightful Tiger, Your welcome thank you for stopping by.


Insightful Tiger profile image

Insightful Tiger 3 years ago

Very useful hub! I had no idea what was in baking powder and now I know! Thank you for sharing!


moonlake profile image

moonlake 3 years ago from America Author

Au fait, Thank you and thanks for stopping by. I appreciate the vote and share.


Au fait profile image

Au fait 3 years ago from North Texas

Interesting article. I learned something new and I always love that. I think this would be great for people who bake a lot so that if they did run out of baking powder they could make their own instead of running to the store. Making your own anything is getting more popular nowadays since processed products may have ingredients in them one might prefer weren't there.

I like that you included a way to test the baking powder to make sure it's still good. Since there's only me and I rarely bake anymore, it would be nice to know if the baking powder in my cupboard needs replacing.

Excellent informative hub! Voted up, useful, and will share.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 3 years ago from America Author

athulnair, Your welcome. Thanks for stopping by.


athulnair profile image

athulnair 3 years ago from India

Thanks for sharing the knowledge. Helpful for novice cooks like me.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 3 years ago from America Author

beingwell, Thank you for the vote and comment, I appreciate it.


beingwell profile image

beingwell 3 years ago from Bangkok

Voted up! Thanks for this hub, moonlake! I had no idea that there are 2 kinds of baking powder, really!


moonlake profile image

moonlake 3 years ago from America Author

Peggy W, Thank you for stopping by I appreciate it and thanks so much for the vote and share.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 3 years ago from Houston, Texas

What a revelation! I had no idea that baking powder could be made at home. I also did not know that cream of tartar was made from the residue of grapes. This was most interesting! Voted that and more plus will share.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 3 years ago from America Author

Kathryn Stratford, Thanks so much for stopping by and leaving a comment I appreciate.


Kathryn Stratford profile image

Kathryn Stratford 3 years ago from Manchester, Connecticut

This is very handy to know! Every once in a while I realize I'm out of something when I'm about to bake or cook, so it is very nice to know what to use as a substitution.

I don't think I have ever made baking powder before.

Thanks for sharing this with us.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 3 years ago from America Author

rajan jolly, Thank you for stopping in and for the vote and stars. I appreciate it.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 3 years ago from America Author

RTalloni, I have not made the Cocoa Indians yet but plan on doing that and putting on my baked picture. Thanks so much for stopping by and for the pin.


rajan jolly profile image

rajan jolly 3 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

I didn't know baking powder could be made at home. Very informative. Voted up and interesting and gave 5 stars.


RTalloni profile image

RTalloni 3 years ago from the short journey

This is good information and important for everyone to be aware of because we may not always be able to buy the kind of baking powder that we want/need. Super video!

Thanks for the extra recipe. Cocoa Indians look like a must try!

Pinning to my Ways with Food board.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 3 years ago from America Author

vespawoolf, Thank you for stopping by and leaving a comment I appreciate it .


vespawoolf profile image

vespawoolf 3 years ago from Peru, South America

I buy double-acting baking powder at a special baking store here in Peru. Most baking powders here are single acting; too finicky for baking. Baking powder is sold in small packets so it's always fresh. The chemical explanation is really interesting, as well as your information on how to check for fresh baking powder. Thanks!


moonlake profile image

moonlake 3 years ago from America Author

Koren, Your welcome. Glad you stopped by and left a comment. Happy New Year.


Koren 3 years ago

Thank you so much for The recipe to how to make baking powder some times I run out of it and I panic so thank you very much very helpful


moonlake profile image

moonlake 3 years ago from America Author

Cricketsong, Thank you so much for stopping by. Have a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.


Cricketsong 3 years ago

Great video, who'd a thunk Aluminum Sulfate...doesn't sound good. I'm always trying to find ways to get chemical additives out of our diet, this info will help with my Christmas baking. You're an angle to provide the info free.

Thank you and have a wonderful Christmas.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 4 years ago from America Author

Mama Kim 8, Thank you and thanks for stopping by. I appreciate it.


Mama Kim 8 profile image

Mama Kim 8 4 years ago

Wonderful information and advise here. This is something all bakers should be familiar with ^_^ voted up and useful!


moonlake profile image

moonlake 4 years ago from America Author

RyGuy,

Thanks for stopping by. I would think the aluminum is what you are tasting in the baking powder. You and your family members must be senstive to that taste.

I'm that way when cooking with cast iron. I love to use cast iron but sometimes I taste the iron and I don't like that taste.


RyGuy 4 years ago

This is very helpful. My sister, mother, and grandmother, and myself cannot eat anything baked that has double acting baking powder in it. It has a very bitter taste and a nasty aftertaste as well. I have been told that it is a genetic thing that allows makes us taste the powder. Reading your ingredients and explanation I am assuming it is because of the aluminum. I have looked all over different stores and have not been able to find a single acting baking powder. Just wanted to thanks you for the education.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 5 years ago from America Author

Your welcome glad you stopped by.


kim  5 years ago

Thank you for the lesson about baking powder , very useful for house wife in kitchen , I really appreciate it


moonlake profile image

moonlake 5 years ago from America Author

Thank you and thanks for stopping by.


crystolite profile image

crystolite 5 years ago from Houston TX

Interesting article which is well shared.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 6 years ago from America Author

Thanks, glad you stopped by...


Granny's House profile image

Granny's House 6 years ago from Older and Hopefully Wiser Time

Wow, this is so cool! Now if I am out of Baking powder, I know I can just make some.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 6 years ago from America Author

Thanks for stopping by my hub and leaving a comment.


VintageTidbits profile image

VintageTidbits 6 years ago

Thank you for the advice to know if the baking powder is still good. I enjoyed your hub.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 7 years ago from America Author

Thanks for stopping by and leaving a comment. Mom's can't teach every thing but we sure try.


Canada girl 7 years ago

Very cool? Even my Mom never taught me this.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 7 years ago from America Author

Thanks wohali for stopping by and signing my hub.


wohali 7 years ago

another great article that explains the different ingredients used, and how to avoid aluminum if you want: http://www.culinate.com/articles/features/baking_p...


moonlake profile image

moonlake 7 years ago from America Author

Glad you stopped by RGraf.


RGraf profile image

RGraf 7 years ago from Wisconsin

Thanks for the info - you learn something new every day.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 7 years ago from America Author

Your welcome I didn't know this either until I was going through my spices one day and found the recipe on the back of the cream of tartar then I started doing some research and dug out some of my vintage cookbooks and realize what the the difference was. Thanks for stopping by.


G-Ma Johnson profile image

G-Ma Johnson 7 years ago from NW in the land of the Free

OMG here I am doing all organic cooking and didn't know this dah dahhhh...thank you sweetie for making me so much more alert to good cooking..I loved and am certaintly gonna mark this one...you are just too much I love it...G-Ma :o) Hugs & Peace


moonlake profile image

moonlake 7 years ago from America Author

Your welcome thanks for stopping.


Netters profile image

Netters 7 years ago from Land of Enchantment - NM

Wow, I never knew that, thank you so much for the info.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 7 years ago from America Author

Jerilee Wei and Vladimir Uhri thanks for stopping by glad you like the hub.


Vladimir Uhri profile image

Vladimir Uhri 7 years ago from HubPages, FB

Thanks for education.


Jerilee Wei profile image

Jerilee Wei 7 years ago from United States

This is a revelation to me, I didn't know you could make your own baking powder. Great hub!

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