Beer - Great Brew Recipes

Bug Light Bitter
5 Gallons, all-grain
Target Original Gravity = 1.034
Final Gravity Range = 1.006 - 1.010
IBU = ~30

Ingredients:
6 lb. 8 oz. English pale ale malt
6 oz. 40o Lovibond crystal malt
5 oz. flaked maize
1 oz. carapils malt
2.33 oz. East Kent Goldings hops (pelletized)
1 tsp. Irish moss
Dry English Ale yeast such as Wyeast Thames Valley (1275) or White Labs Bedford British (WLP006)
5/8 cup corn sugar for priming

Instructions:
Mix grains with 2 gallons of 169 degrees F water to achieve a mash temperature of 151 degrees F throughout. Mash for 90 minutes or until conversion is complete. Sparge with 4 gallons of 170 degrees F water and runoff into the kettle. Bring the wort to a boil and add 1.33 oz. East Kent Goldings hops. Boil for 45 minutes and add the Irish moss. Boil for 10 more minutes and add 0.5 oz. East Kent Goldings hops. Boil for an additional 5 minutes and add the remaining 0.5 oz. of East Kent Goldings at knockout. Cool the wort quickly and strain into your primary fermenter. Pitch yeast once wort has cooled to less than 80 degrees F. Aerate the wort well and ferment at 65 to 70 degrees F for 7 to 10 days. Transfer the beer to the secondary fermenter and ferment at 65 to 70 degrees F until it reaches the target final gravity and becomes clear. Prime with corn sugar and bottle or keg as desired.

Proud To Be An American Light Lager
5 Gallons, all-grain
Target Original Gravity = 1.028
Final Gravity Range = 1.005 - 1.008
IBU = ~12

Ingredients:
2 lb. 5 oz. American six-row malt
1 lb. 9 oz. American two-row malt
2 lb. flaked maize
0.33 oz. Cluster hops (pelletized)
0.5 oz. Saaz hops (pelletized)
0.33 oz. Spalt hops (pelletized)
0.33 oz. Willamette hops (pelletized)
1 tsp. Irish moss
Attenuative lager yeast such as Wyeast Pilsen Lager (2007) or White Labs American Lager (WLP840)
7/8 cup corn sugar for priming

Instructions:
Mix grains with 2 gallons of 169 degrees F water to achieve a mash temperature of 151 degrees F throughout. Mash for 90 minutes or until conversion is complete. Sparge with 4 gallons of 170 degrees F water and runoff into the kettle. Bring the wort to a boil and add the Cluster hops. Boil for 45 minutes and add the Irish moss. Boil for an additional 5 minutes and add the Spalt hops. Boil for an additional 8 minutes and add the Willamette hops. Boil for 2 more minutes and add the Saaz hops at knockout. Cool the wort quickly and strain into your primary fermenter. Pitch yeast once wort has cooled to less than 80 degrees F. Aerate the wort well and ferment at 50 to 55 degrees F for 14 days. Transfer the beer to the secondary fermenter and condition at 40 degrees F for 30 days. Prime with corn sugar and bottle or keg as desired.

Ich Bin Ein Berliner Weisse
5 Gallons, all-grain
Target Original Gravity = 1.030
Final Gravity Range = 1.006 - 1.008
IBU = ~5

Ingredients:
3 lb. 6 oz. German two-row lager or pilsner malt
2 lb. 13 oz. Wheat malt
0.25 oz. Tettnanger hops (pelletized)
1 tsp. Irish moss
60 ml food grade lactic acid
Clean fermenting American ale yeast such as Wyeast American Ale (1056) or White Labs California Ale (WLP001)
7/8 cup corn sugar for priming

Instructions:
Mix grains with 2 gallons of 170 degrees F water to achieve a mash temperature of 152 degrees F throughout. Mash for 90 minutes or until conversion is complete. Sparge with 4 gallons of 170 degrees F water and runoff into the kettle. Bring the wort to a boil and add the Tettnanger hops. Boil for 45 minutes and add the Irish moss. Boil for 15 minutes more and remove the kettle from the heat. Cool the wort quickly and strain into your primary fermenter. Pitch yeast once wort has cooled to less than 80 degrees F. Aerate the wort well and ferment at 68 to 72 degrees F for 7 to 10 days. Transfer the beer to the secondary fermenter and ferment at 68 to 72 degrees F until it reaches the target final gravity and becomes clear. Add the food grade lactic acid to the finished beer just before packaging. Prime with corn sugar and bottle or keg as desired.

Note that brewers of authentic Berliner Weissebier typically ferment with a German ale yeast and add lactic acid bacteria to achieve the tartness characteristic of the style. There is, however, an easier way for those who don't want to risk messing around with bacteria. You can achieve similar characteristics by adding a small amount of food grade lactic acid to the finished beer before bottling. For this recipe, I chose to employ a clean fermenting American ale yeast to help accentuate this tartness. However, an attenuative German ale yeast should also give acceptable results.

Additionally, this beer and the American light lager could both benefit from a 15 minute protein rest at 122 degrees F.

Continued in: Beer - Sailing The Coolship

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