Best Cheese Grits - Ever!

Cheese grits are hearty and can be served as a side or main dish.
Cheese grits are hearty and can be served as a side or main dish. | Source

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4.5 stars from 6 ratings of Cheese Grits

Grits? They're Good, Really!

When I lived in New York, the suggestion of grits was seldom met joyfully. I soon discovered why when I ordered a side of grits at a diner. I eagerly opened my mouth, anticipating the creamy, flavorful delight I learned to make from my Southern StepDaddy. I was disappointed. Hot water. They tasted like textured, hot water. Blech. I knew instantly why my roommates and work colleagues looked at me in surprise when I suggested making grits. So, I decided they had to try mine. And they were won over, asked me to teach them. One of my roommates added maple syrup to the butter/milk-only recipe -- kind of like Cream of Wheat. I have been told they still prepare them some 15 years later.

Ingredients

2 cups water
2 cups whole milk or 2% at thinnest
1/4 stick of butter
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon coarsley ground black pepper
4 ounces cream cheese
8 ounces sharp cheddar (Vermont extra sharp - white - is my favorite!)
1 cup old fashioned grits (instant work fine, but the old-fashioned step it up a notch)

Preparation

Place a medium saucepan over high heat. Pour in water, bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-high, stir in milk, butter, salt & pepper. Stir occasionally until steaming heavily. Add cream cheese, cut into smaller chunks, stirring til blended. Add cheddar cheese, stirring til completely melted and blended. Slowly pour in grits, stirring the entire time, which prevents lumping. Stir until the grits are completely blended into the mixture, reducing heat to medium-low. Cook for 20 minutes, stirring frequently.

Often, cooks prepare the grits in water and then add cheese or milk or butter. The key step in preparing grits full of flavor is to prepare the liquid base first, so the grits absorb the flavor while they cook. Otherwise, you're just covering up a hot water flavor.

If you want to opt out of the cheese, simply increase the butter to half or whole stick! Not the healthiest option, but it is tasty.


Grits are a perfect accompaniment to a variety of dishes -- including seafood.  Pictured is a plate from a crawfish boil.
Grits are a perfect accompaniment to a variety of dishes -- including seafood. Pictured is a plate from a crawfish boil. | Source
Grits are great for breakfast, lunch or dinner.  Here is a picture of the tray my kids made for Mother's Day 2011.
Grits are great for breakfast, lunch or dinner. Here is a picture of the tray my kids made for Mother's Day 2011. | Source

Serving

Although officially classified as a cereal grain, grits are a tasty accompaniment for just about any meal - breakfast, lunch, or dinner. They are excellent with shrimp and fried green tomatoes, or eggs and sausage with fruit, or even in a casserole.

The cheese grits in this recipe are hearty enough to serve as a stand alone breakfast.

Enjoy!

Nutritional Value

Grits are surprisingly healthy. Made from corn, they offer over 20% of the USDA recommended serving of folate. They also have a little over 3 grams of protein per serving, and provide Vitamin A, Thiamin, and Pantothenic Acid. With an amino acid score of 55, NutritionData.com states, "Adding other foods with complementary amino acid profiles to this food may yield a more complete protein source and improve the quality of some types of restrictive diets."


Read More http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/breakfast-cereals/1634/2#ixzz1vpw4Orgz.

How Often do You Serve Grits

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Thank You!

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Comments 3 comments

Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 4 years ago from England

Hi, I have never tried grits as I come from England, but what I gather is that they are the same as porridge? English breakfast, but done in a different way for other meals too, sounds fascinating and I may just give it a go, thanks!


breathe2travel profile image

breathe2travel 4 years ago from Gulf Coast, USA Author

Yes, grits are similar to porridge or farina. Thank you, Nell Rose for reading and commenting. If you try them, I'd like to hear your opinion! Best regards~


Danette Watt profile image

Danette Watt 4 years ago from Illinois

Nice hub breath2travel.

I have to share a funny story about grits. When I went into the Navy, the first morning I was there, I went through the chow line. Feeling homesick already, my eyes lit upon a dish that I thought would cheer me up - oatmeal. I didn't even like oatmeal then so I'm not sure why I thought I would like it but as I said, I was feeling lonely.

I took one bite and immediately spit it out. I knew right away it was that dish people called 'grits'! I have never had it since and don't intend to.

However, my 2 kids will eat it when they are home because their dad, who is from Alabama and other parts south, grew up eating it and they learned it from him. Maybe it's all in how you cook it and what you add to it but it's like eating sand to me (hence the name 'grits' I suppose! *smile*)

My husband and I have made a bargain - he won't ask me to eat grits and I won't ask him to eat kiszka (keesh-ka) which is a Polish blood sausage I grew up eating.

Anyway, voted up and useful.

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