Cuban Style Oxtail

Source

Cuban Creole Cooking

Creole cooking is very famous worldwide. What’s not to like about it? It’s mostly just improvised French Food by different African Cultures. Most islands in the Caribbean have been influenced by Africa: Cuba, Haiti, Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico have all been lucky enough to had had this culture bestowed upon them. As a result, the cuisines of these countries are very seasoned and quite tasty at that.... French Food is famous in of itself, but African Peoples living on these islands found it a bit on the bland side. So, they decided to spice it up a bit in order to make it taste better, and that they did.... Additionally, because some of these islands were French Colonies at one point of another, African Slaves made it a point to improve on the already below par food that the slaves owners were handing to them. All the history behind these countries were ultimately responsible for the creation of so called Creole Cooking....

Oxtail is just one of these islands’ delicacies. Cuba, Belize and Jamaica make oxtail differently from one another, some spicier than others.

Here’s Cuba’s version of this famous dish:

Packet of Oxtail which you can purchase at most supermarkets
Onions
Bell Peppers. (One red/other green)
Tomato sauce (you could replace tomato sauce with spaghetti sauce)
clove of Garlic
A bottle of red wine and a bottle of cooking wine
Add salt, pepper, cumin, oregano, laurel leaves
Cooking oil and Vinegar

This can be a meal for two or twenty people. Since people are much more informed nowadays than they were 50 years ago, condiments such as salt and pepper can be used sparingly, or you can use a lot of it, it all depends on you the chef. But remember, people today are finicky and well informed, so take it easy on the salt and oil!

Chop up all the vegetables and take out a big pot. Turn the burner on at low heat and pour oil in the pot (like I said both olive and regular oil) Add garlic first. Once you do that, wait for it to start sizzling a bit. Then add all the chopped up vegetables. Stir fry for a little while, and then add Salt, pepper, cumin, oregano, laurel leaves. At this time you can turn the heat up just a bit. Stir fry everything together. Then add the Wine, Vinegar, Tomato sauce, and water. After this is done. Place the Oxtails inside. Bring heat to a very low boil. Once the pot starts to boil, wait about 10 minutes. After that, cover the pot and bring the heat down to simmer so that it boils slowly. Once you've done all this (The real trick is to let it boil on very low heat for about 4 1/2 hours or so, or until the meat is fully tender), it's a waiting process. After 4 hours. Uncover the pot and bring the heat on high. Wait until all the water and wine have evaporated complete. Once this is done you can turn heat off. Wait for about 15 minutes or so, and then serve. This can be served with white rice or pasta. Remember that some people prefer their food with more salt (condiments) and others with less. Also 4 cups of water might be too much depending on the size of the pot.


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Comments 22 comments

summerberrie 4 years ago

John, I love Oxtail. We had a Cuban restaurant here that sold Oxtail stew-it was so good, but they went out of business. I will give yours a try. Thanks for the recipe.


Austin Jose profile image

Austin Jose 4 years ago from Cochin

Thanks a lot for the recipe! Voted up!


John Sarkis profile image

John Sarkis 4 years ago from Los Angeles, CA Author

Hi summerberri and thanks for stopping by...

Yes, it's really tasty stuff, only thing is it takes a long time to cook.

Take care

John


John Sarkis profile image

John Sarkis 4 years ago from Los Angeles, CA Author

Thanks Austin for stopping by and commenting on my article

Take care

John


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South

This sounds fantastic, sounds like my kind of food. Thanks for sharing the recipe.


John Sarkis profile image

John Sarkis 4 years ago from Los Angeles, CA Author

Jackie, it's really great food, but the trick is on taking it slow. You've heard the famous chef saying "low and slow" is what makes food taste good. Ironically enough, with all the information we have today cooking fast is best for you, because, it doesn't loose nutritional value...., however, oxtail is mere comfort food - nothing else!

Take care and thanks for stopping by

John


wayseeker profile image

wayseeker 4 years ago from Colorado

Hey John,

I've never tried Ox Tail, though I love trying new meats as often as I can. I'm not generally much for bell peppers, but I think I could make an exception in this case. I've bookmarked it so I can return to it sometime when I've got a little time to cook.

Thanks for the interesting culinary adventure!

wayseeker


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 4 years ago from The Beautiful South

OK thanks for the tip and any meat I prefer a slow cook even if I give it a quick grill to sear for flavor.


John Sarkis profile image

John Sarkis 4 years ago from Los Angeles, CA Author

Hi wayseeker,

This is a Cuban delicacy and it's great!

Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

Take care

John


John Sarkis profile image

John Sarkis 4 years ago from Los Angeles, CA Author

Hi Jackie,

This food takes a long time to cook. I don't know if you've ever had "pig's feet," but it's similar.

Info: any food that is not of high class (don't know what other word to use?) usually takes a long time to cook, because, you need to tenderized it. (e.g., Filet Mignon only takes 5 minutes to cook and lobster, you can practically eat it raw!)

Take care and I hope all goes well

John


alocsin profile image

alocsin 4 years ago from Orange County, CA

This sounds delicious and I love Cuban food. Voting this Up and Awesome.


John Sarkis profile image

John Sarkis 4 years ago from Los Angeles, CA Author

Thanks alocsin for stopping by and commenting

Cuban food is my favorite (of course I'm Cuban...LOL), followed by Chinese...

Take care

John


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 4 years ago from Houston, Texas

This sounds delicious. I'll bet your home smells wonderful when you are making this! Thanks for your recipe. Have you ever tried using a pressure cooker to speed up the cooking time? Voted up!


John Sarkis profile image

John Sarkis 4 years ago from Los Angeles, CA Author

Hi Peggy and thanks for stopping by and commenting.

Yes, a pressure cooker will speed things up. Many Latinos use pressure cookers to make for example, beans. All said, it's better the traditional way. I'm sure you've heard the famous chef saying "low and slow..."

Take care

John


vespawoolf profile image

vespawoolf 4 years ago from Peru, South America

We happen to have oxtail here in Peru and it's inexpensive, so I'm going to give this a try. Thank you for sharing a recipe!


John Sarkis profile image

John Sarkis 4 years ago from Los Angeles, CA Author

Hi vespawoolf and thanks for stopping by.

Yes, most Latin American countries eat oxtail in one form or another, so Peru is no exception. I hope you enjoy it.

Take care

John

PS. Must be very interesting living abroad


vespawoolf profile image

vespawoolf 4 years ago from Peru, South America

There's never a dull moment but I wouldn't trade it for the world. : )


John Sarkis profile image

John Sarkis 4 years ago from Los Angeles, CA Author

Enjoy yourself ;-)


Derdriu 4 years ago

John, The foods of the islands and the lands surrounding the Caribbean are so colorful, diverse ... and spicy! This recipe makes me think of some of the foods which I sampled while traveling along and off the coast of Brazil.

Respectfully, and with many thanks for sharing such a delicious dish, Derdriu


John Sarkis profile image

John Sarkis 4 years ago from Los Angeles, CA Author

Hello my friend, long time no see...thanks for stopping by and commenting.

Yes, the Caribbean Islands and parts of South America have strong African influences and their foods are no exception. Oxtail is one of my favorites, even if it takes a long time for it to come out right.

Thanks again and take care of yourself

John


Phoebe Pike 4 years ago

Wow. I had never heard of a recipe like this before... I might have to give it a try.


John Sarkis profile image

John Sarkis 4 years ago from Los Angeles, CA Author

Hi Phoebe and thanks for commenting.

Yes, it's not for everyone, but if you like experimenting new cuisines, then I suggest you try it and see if you like it or not.

Thanks again and enjoy your weekend

John

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