Dairy Products, Beauty Products: What Can Milk, Yoghurt and Cheese Do For Your Health and Beauty?

Milk and Cookies!

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Sometimes you look at the contents of your shopping cart and you just have to sigh. I mean, how did the multi-pack of potato chips get in there, anyway? Did it fall in just of its own volition? (Hint: no, it didn't. You had a moment of weakness. It happens. Get over it.) And it's not just the chips. It's the candy. It's the cookies. It's the ready meals and the frozen tv dinners and the... Actually, don't think about it, don't even think about it. It's too depressing, really.

No, think about the good stuff instead! Because there is good stuff in your supermarket trolley, when you have made your selection! (Probably. Unless you actually live on hostess cookies and cheesy wotsits. Do you actually live on hostess cookies and cheesy wotsits? Oh dear.)

No, of course you don't do that. I hope. I'll just bet there are lots of fruits and vegetables in your jam-packed trolley. Lean meats and fish, oily fish even (okay, maybe not if you're a vegetarian or vegan). Nuts, beans, rice and wholemeal bread! Something, surely? I'll bet you've got milk or yoghurt or cheese in there, at least. You have? Fantastic! (You probably haven't got kefir culture in there. But you may have buttermilk. Goat's milk, even!)

Let's think about all the ways that dairy products are fantastic. You're gonna feel so good about yourself! First off, protein. Dairy products are rich in protein, right? According to the Nutritiondata website, cheddar cheese has 33 grams per 132 gram serving,2 plain low-fat yoghurt has 13 grams per 245 gram serving,3 and non-fat milk has 8 grams per 247 gram serving.4 That's set against the average adult daily requirement of 46 grams (women) and 56 grams (men) according to the http://www.cdc.gov website.1 Not too shabby!

And what can all that lovely protein do for you, you gorgeous creature? Well, protein is the food constituent that is (clears throat) the BUILDING BLOCK OF THE BODY. Like bricks. Anything need repairing? Building up? Making from scratch? That's right, protein is your boy! (Or amino-acid polymer, anyway.) Your nails are made of protein (keratin), your hair is made of protein, too. Lovely hair and nails, an essential for every girl! (And guy!)

And don't forget about calcium. The wonders of calcium, you never stop hearing about it! Well, I suppose ingesting a fair whack of it beats osteoporosis and your bones giving in to the force of gravity, right? Plus with magnesium it's been alleged it's supposed to help you sleep, relax,5. and is popularly supposed to be good for your nails. (Although this has been disputed, e.g. by I.R. Reid in the New England Journal of Medicine.6 That sounds like kind of a bargain to me! Back to Nutritiondata – cheddar cheese has 95 per cent of the Daily Value per 132 grams, non-fat milk (calcium fortified) has fifty per cent of the Daily Value per 274 grams, and plain yogurt has 45 per cent per 245 grams. See: you had health food in your trolley the whole time and you didn't even know it! Go you!

References.

  1. Centers For Disease Control and Prevention. 'Protein.' http://www.cdc.gov/ Updated 31/10/2011. Link at http://www.cdc.gov/nutrition/everyone/basics/protein.html#How%20much%20protein Accessed 14/09/2012.

  2. Nutritiondata website. 'Cheese, cheddar.' http://nutritiondata.self.com Updated 2012. Link at http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/8/2. Accessed 14/09/2012.

  3. Nutritiondata website. 'Yogurt, plain, low fat, 12 grams protein per 8 ounce.' http://nutritiondata.self.com Updated 2012. Link at http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/105/2. Accessed 14/09/2012.

  4. Nutritiondata website. 'Milk, fluid, nonfat, calcium fortified (fat free or skim).' http://nutritiondata.self.com Updated 2012. Link at http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/7578/2 Accessed 14/09/2012.

  5. Health.com website. '8 Natural Remedies that may help you sleep.' 2012. Link at http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20306715_2,00.html Accessed 14/09/2012.

  6. IR Reid, M.D. 'Calcium Supplements and Nail Quality.' New England Journal of Medicine. 2000. Volume 343: pp.1817. 14/12/2000.


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