Add a Lazy Susan to your table so those around the table can reach for condiments

Lazy Susan with rail
Lazy Susan with rail
Mission Style Lazy Susan
Mission Style Lazy Susan
Basket Style Lazy Susan
Basket Style Lazy Susan
Table for Two?  Lazy Susan with oil lamp and salt and pepper shaker.  Several lamp shade options available
Table for Two? Lazy Susan with oil lamp and salt and pepper shaker. Several lamp shade options available
Counter top Lazy Susan Organizer
Counter top Lazy Susan Organizer
Another counter top Lazy Susan Organizer
Another counter top Lazy Susan Organizer
Lazy Susan CD Rack  This item is located under the Home Essential Tab.
Lazy Susan CD Rack This item is located under the Home Essential Tab.

Why not let them self serve from a Lazy Susan?

The term and introduction of the “Lazy Susan” debuted in a 1906 edition of Good Housekeeping Magazine, although the concept dates back into the 18th century and various other terms are used and in other languages.

The Lazy Susan was also called a dumbwaiter however this term is now commonly used to describe a small elevator to transport laundry and other household needs to different floors in a multi-story home.

There is no evidence to clearly substantiate how the device was ever related to a lazy Susan.Only one can speculate that a lady named Susan somehow came up with the idea, and called herself the lazy one or her husband who had to build it for her referred to her as being lazy in serving others, probably thinking of himself of course.

In reality the dumbwaiter probably still best describes the device; it is a platform which rotates on a ball bearing base allowing dishes and condiments to be set in the middle of the table. As family or guest need something they can sit rotate the platform to retrieve their food needs without having to bother someone to pass it or having some one like you to actually wait on them.

Over the years the Lazy Susan designs changed to go with the period furniture designs being used. Some are round, while some are square and mirror the Mission or Arts and Crafts period.

Today the Lazy Susan is still a very popular and useful item for use on the kitchen table or kitchen counter, and in restaurants. Some have also adapted them to their work space and office tables to easily reach office tools, or to self serve coffee and other condiments on the conference room table. Most recently we even sold several to be used by the Navy for shipboard dining halls. The potential uses for these self waiters are endless.

Several Lazy Susan’s work great on buffet tables, or self serve hotel breakfast bars especially when the tables are set up to serve on either side.

At Cottage Craft Works we carry several different styles and sizes ranging from 12”up to 16” to adapt to almost any need or decor. The 16” is ideal for a large round table used in restaurants who serve several dishes family style or communally shared dishes such as in a Chinese restaurant.

The smaller 12” round size is perfect for small family tables or to use on the counter, or in the cabinet (space permitting) for spices and other often used items. The square or round Lazy Susan work as well on square or rectangle tables. We have ours on a long harvest table.

We also offer two new styles designed with shelves and storage slots for spices, cooking utensils and spices.

All of our Lazy Susan's are Amish handcrafted using metal ball bearing turn tables. They come in options of oak or cherry. Some come with napkin holders, and we even have one that comes with an oil lamp and salt and pepper shakers.

See all of our Lazy Susan styles and woods at Cottage Craft Works .COM

Cottage Craft Works at http://www.cottagecraftworks.com is a unique online general store full of handy and useful hard to find American made products from earlier centuries. The old time products that you grew up with are still being made today in small cottage based businesses and Cottage Craft Works has assembled them all on one back-to-basics site.

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