How to Make Stilton Cheese at Home

Blue-Mold Stilton Cheese

What Makes A True Stilton Cheese

Stilton is considered one of the best blue-mold cheeses on earth. It was developed in Leicestershire and parts of Nottinghamshire, England, and today you will find it on the most critical of cheese-critics platters world wide. The name Stilton legally only applies to those cheeses made in the "shires" of England that have been protected by English law. In this article the cheese being made is referred to as Stilton, but actually is a Stilton-like cheese, because to be called Stilton, it must abide by the aforementioned British laws; which obviously it will not.

Stilton Cheese Flavor Profile

The true Stilton Brit has a smooth texture and distinct flavor of Cheddar, while allowing the musty spices of a softer, blue-veined cheese to shine through.

Warning

When making your Stilton cheese at home, be sure to remember that even the slightest variation in timing, stirring, washing or setting, can make your Stilton cheese product quite different in flavor, aroma, and texture.

What To Serve With Stilton Cheese

This recipe for Stilton is easier than most of the blue-mold cheese recipes you'll find these days. Commercial Stilton cheese wheels measure around 16 pounds, possibly making your handmade Stilton round seem inadequate— rest assured you will happily match the flavor of your homemade Stilton with any store bought brand, and with pride! When the time comes to serve-up your masterpiece, be sure to pair it with sweeter fruits, milder vegetables, greens, and breads that offer a sweet counterpoint.

What The Heck Is Rennet

INGREDIENTS FOR MAKING STILTON CHEESE

  • 2 gallons (7.6 L) whole milk
  • 2 cups (500ml) light cream, (25 to 40% fat)
  • 1/8 teaspoon Penicillium Roqueforti, (strain of mold that causes the striations in your Stilton))
  • 1/4 teaspoon liquid rennet (enzyme that encourages milk to coagulate), diluted in 1/4 cup (60ml) of cool water
  • 2 tablespoons cheese salt

Your STILTON CHEESE Timeline from Beginning to End

Stilton is a moderately easy cheese to make. It does take some handwork, patience, and most importantly time.

BEGINNING TO END

  • ≈ 5 hours for heating and ripening
  • ≈ 2 hours for molding
  • 3 - 15 hours (overnight) for setting
  • ≈ 3 days for draining
  • ≈ 3 months for curing (as many as 6 months)

This timeline will vary from recipe to recipe, but as a general rule, this framework will suffice.

SUPPLIES

  • Mats or small towels for air drying cheese (good old fashion sushi mats work marvelously!)
  • Cheesecloth for draining and handling cheese
  • Stilton is an air dried cheese, so cheese sealing wax is not required

IMPORTANT NOTE:

Be sure to spray and wipe down any tools, surfaces, and equipment with vinegar to prevent foreign molds from contaminating your Stilton. Neglecting this one task will make for a tragic outcome!

Cheese-making Supplies and Equipment

EQUIPMENT (it is best to use stainless steel when you can find it)

  • Curd knife, to cut the curds
  • Long-handled slotted spoon and ladle, for stirring
  • Whisks, for stirring and turning curds
  • Thermometer (a dairy thermometer is best)
  • Measuring spoons, and cups (for liquid and dry measure)
  • A 2-pound cheese mold (or equivalent of a 2-pound mold)
  • Double boiler, cheese board, 9X9 cake pan, colander
  • Cheese press, or items used for pressure and draining curds (a board & a 5-pound weight)

How Will You Rate This Stilton Recipe?

4.2 stars from 5 ratings of Homemade Stilton-like Cheese

A Very Simple Tutorial For Making Stilton Cheese (Thank you Gavin Webber for making a great video for me to use!)

Bring the milk blend slowly to 88F and add the mesophilic starter culture
Bring the milk blend slowly to 88F and add the mesophilic starter culture
Mix rennet with  cup cool water, then Add the liquid rennet to the milk
Mix rennet with cup cool water, then Add the liquid rennet to the milk
Whey separating and rising to the top of the curds
Whey separating and rising to the top of the curds
Spoon the curds into a cheesecloth placed in a colander for draining
Spoon the curds into a cheesecloth placed in a colander for draining
using a chopstick to support curds over milk pot to further drain
using a chopstick to support curds over milk pot to further drain
This homemade cheesse press and mold work just fine. The important thing is proper even pressure and correct timing
This homemade cheesse press and mold work just fine. The important thing is proper even pressure and correct timing

Lets Get Making Stilton Cheese

HEATING AND ADDING CULTURE

Using a double boiler, blend together the milk and cream until they slowly reach 88°F. Gently stir in the starter culture, turn off the heat. Allow the milk to ripen covered and undisturbed for 45 minutes.

ADDING RENNET, COOKING & CUTTING CURDS

Add the liquid rennet to ¼ cup cool water and gently stir this liquid into the cultured milk using a wire whisk to make certain all of the ingredients are blended. DO NOT STIR THE MILK VIGOROUSLY. Cover the pot and let the milk ripen undisturbed for 1½ - 2 hours, or until no curds cling to the knife when you cut into them. Cut the curds into ½-inch cubes and let them rest for 20 minutes. The whey will rise to the top.

DRAINING AND PRESSING THE CURDS

Line a colander with a large double-thick piece of cheesecloth, you want it to be big enough to wrap the cheese completely when done. Using a big slotted spoon, transfer the curds into the colander; then allow them to rest for 1 hour.

Tie the corners of the cloth together forming a bag around the curds, and slide a dowel or chopstick under the knot. Hang the bag over the milk pot, held up by the dowel. Allow the curds to drain for another 30-40 minutes—until the whey stops dripping.

Move the bag of curds to a shallow bowl (or cheese press). Top the curds with a board, then a 5-pound weight. Let the cheese rest for 12 - 15 hours, or overnight. It is important that the cheese is in a draft-free area of your kitchen.

Cut the solid mass of curds into 1- 1 inch cubes.
Cut the solid mass of curds into 1- 1 inch cubes.
Cut curds and mix together 2 tablespoons of salt with  teaspoon blue-mold powder.
Cut curds and mix together 2 tablespoons of salt with teaspoon blue-mold powder.
Sprinkle the salt and blue-mold powder blend over the curds and mix them together with a slotted spoon or your hands
Sprinkle the salt and blue-mold powder blend over the curds and mix them together with a slotted spoon or your hands
Spoon into a 2-pound mold. Place a cheese board in a shallow draining pan. Top the board with a cheese mat, followed by cheese filled mold.
Spoon into a 2-pound mold. Place a cheese board in a shallow draining pan. Top the board with a cheese mat, followed by cheese filled mold.
cover it with another mat and a board or saucer. Be sure to flip the mold over every 10 hours or so.
cover it with another mat and a board or saucer. Be sure to flip the mold over every 10 hours or so.

MILLING AND SALTING THE CURDS

Remove the weight and board, and take the curds out of the cloth as a single mass. Place the cheese mass into a large bowl. Using a curd knife cut the curds into 1- 1½ inch cubes. In a measuring cup mix together 2 tablespoons of salt with ¼ teaspoon blue-mold powder. Sprinkle the mixture over the curds and blend them together with a slotted spoon or your hands, until all of the curds are coated with the salt and powder.

MOLDING AND DRAINING THE CHEESE

Give yourself 3 days for molding and draining the Stilton. Place a cheese board in a shallow draining pan. Top the board with a cheese mat, followed by a 2-pound mold. Ladle the curds into the mold, cover it with another mat and a board or saucer.

Let the Stilton drain for 1½ hours, making sure to turn it every 30 minutes—3 times in all. Allow the cheese to set for 12 - 15 hours or overnight. Let it continue to drain for the next 3 days, turning the mold every 10 hours or so. This will insure that the liquid remaining inside the your cheese gets distributed evenly throughout the inner body of the cheese. Nothing is worst then having one end of your cheese dry and one end far too moist.

Your Stilton cheese is ready to begin aging.

Remove the cheese from its mold and run a sterile ice pick through the cheese from one flat side to the other
Remove the cheese from its mold and run a sterile ice pick through the cheese from one flat side to the other
Place the pierced cheese on a flat plate or rack that has been topped with a cheese mat. Place the cheese in a cool room or refrigerator. The cheese pictured here shows some maturity and age and is in a variety of shapes and pounds.
Place the pierced cheese on a flat plate or rack that has been topped with a cheese mat. Place the cheese in a cool room or refrigerator. The cheese pictured here shows some maturity and age and is in a variety of shapes and pounds.

AGING YOUR HOMEMADE STILTON CHEESE

Remove the cheese from its mold and run a sterile ice pick through the cheese from one flat side to the other, in several places starting at the center, moving toward the outer edge in a circular pattern. Place the pierced cheese on a flat plate or rack that has been topped with a cheese mat. Place the cheese in a cool room or refrigerator where the temperature and climate is controlled. Age this cheese at 50°F and at 85% humidity.

TIP

A covered plastic container can be used to maintain the proper humidity. This box stored inside your refrigerator will maintain an approximate 85 to 95% humidity with the cheese contained within it, which will allow for your Stilton's graceful aging.

Wine Fridge And Aging Cheese

I have a small wine refrigerator that has adjustable temperature and humidity settings. It makes a great controlled environment for aging my homemade cheeses!

Scraping To Keep Your Cheese Healthy

Once weekly, gently scrape off the heavy surface mold or slime with a butter knife. Air circulation is critical in the forming of blue-veins inside and on the surface of your Stilton cheese. Age your Stilton for a minimum of 90 days before you taste it; it will be full of flavor, yet somewhat mild with a less then creamy texture.

If you are anything like me, you will prefer a stronger, creamier Stilton. This will require continued aging and intermittent taste-testing about every 30 days, and for as many as 6 months.

What You Think Really Does Matter!

Which of these cheeses do you like best?

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More by this Author


Comments for Easy Homemade Cheese Guide - Stilton cheese... 11 comments

Hannah 4 years ago

How many people would this recipe feed?


clintc 5 years ago

so as far as making a white stilton with fruit, i assume you leave out the mold powder and add dried fruit to the mix before packing into the mold. i would assume ice picking after molding would be unnecessary as well because it is for the blue marbling.


blue stilton 5 years ago

Home made cheese are great to eat and enjoyable to make! This is a nice hub to do


K9keystrokes profile image

K9keystrokes 5 years ago from Northern, California Author

Lady_E~ I totally agree with you, and this is the reason I got into cheese-making to begin with; so I would know what was in my cheese. No preservatives, fake colors, or mystery ingredients, which keeps my homemade cheese a whole natural food! I am so thrilled you made it by today, I truly appreciate your comments and support.

K9


Lady_E profile image

Lady_E 5 years ago from London, UK

Thanks for this. I would love to make my own cheese. That way I know what ingredients are in it.


K9keystrokes profile image

K9keystrokes 5 years ago from Northern, California Author

Eiddwen~Stilton is an acquired taste, but one of my very favorites. I am very happy that you gleaned knowledge from this little cheese-making hub! Thank you for your comments, and thanks for the up!

K9

Pamela99~ I smiled when I saw you had made it by today. I am with you, I dig the strong aged cheeses! I appreciate your up! Have a wonderful weekend my friend.

K9

Alverp~ Thanks for commenting on the layout of the article. It took a while to put together, however my goal was to make creating your own cheese pretty simple. So, yeah! Thank you.

K9

Hey Darski~Really glad to see you here today. I appreciate your remarks on the hub and I hope your sister has a wonderful time making Stilton cheese. BTW, you better remember to eat my dear friend. Have your sister share her cheese rewards with you!! Much peace to you Darski!

K9

bettybarnesb~ Thank you for the nice comments. How fun! I would totally share my blue cheese with you if we lived closer to one another. I am grateful you enjoyed the layout of the article. Many blessing to you~

K9


bettybarnesb profile image

bettybarnesb 5 years ago from Bartlett, TN

Hey K9Keystrokes:

I totally love your article! Wish you lived close so I could get a slice of blue cheese.

Very excellent article. Well put together.

Be Blessed


Darlene Sabella profile image

Darlene Sabella 5 years ago from Hello, my name is Toast and Jam, I live in the forest with my dog named Sam ...

This is a Great hub and I am sending it to my sister, she will love this, she is Suzie homemaker, I am not...I write and write and forget to eat...I rate this up love & peace darski


alverp 5 years ago

I don't really like cheese, but if I was into making cheese but this is laid out perfectly! Great job!


Pamela99 profile image

Pamela99 5 years ago from United States

This is a great hub and I love that type of cheese. It is very interesting to know how the cheeses made in aged. Voted/rated up.


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 5 years ago from Wales

Hi,

A great well presented hub.I have to admit here that I hate Stilton but I enjoyed reading this hub.

There is so much to learn no matter how old we are and i learnt from your work today.

Useful/up for this one.

Take care

Eiddwen.

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