Easy and Delicious Cookie Press or Spritz Cookie Recipe

Spring Butterfly Press Cookies for a Baby Shower
Spring Butterfly Press Cookies for a Baby Shower

Spritz Cookies Are NOT Just for Christmas!

Okay, okay, I know, you break out the cookie press at the holidays, add mounds of food coloring to the dough and press out some green wreaths or red trees just in time for the Christmas party. I am guilty of doing the same thing and honestly I had forgotten about my cookie press until prompted to come up with a dessert for an upcoming baby shower.

From this point forward, I resolve never to again to neglect my cookie press and promise to use it more than once a year. Making spritz cookies in a cookie press is just plain old good fashioned fun. It is reminiscent of play dough that was squished and sculpted as a child. You get messy and then are rewarded with a sweet, buttery crisp that just melts in your mouth. The cookie recipe written for you below is so delicious and warming with a perfect amount of vanilla and I have adapted variations to use throughout the year.

Why are they called spritz cookies? Spritzgeback is a German cookie that is buttery and dry. The cookie dough is squeezed through a dough presser which is fitted with different nozzles or discs in order to obtain different patterns. The spritzegback is traditionally a German Christmas cookie and recipes for this cookie are handed down from generation to generation. In the States we call these "spritz" cookies for short or just press cookies.

Cookies were said to be invented in Persia around the 7th century and we had to wait until the 1900s for the cookie press or cookie gun to be invented. Online resellers of vintage cookie presses sell versions of the press dating from the 1950s. If you would like to buy a vintage cookie press look for names such as Wear Ever, Mirro, Nordic Ware or Cookie Chef Trig-o-Matic. Vintage presses are usually metal and manual but some vintage cookie guns are electric. It is unclear who invented the press but there are some fantastic versions on the market today. My press was made by The Pampered Chef and I love it. Some bakers prefer cookie guns that are electric. I happen to like the manual or hand press cookie guns. You have more control over the thickness of the cookies when you use a manual cookie gun.

Cookies from the press can be a variety of shapes thanks to the cookie gun. Hearts, trees, wreaths, umbrellas, flowers, butterflies and pumpkins are just some of the shapes found on the discs of a cookie gun. You can top the cookies with colored sugar, icing, powdered sugar, sprinkles or chopped nuts. The recipe for a spritz cookie is very simple. The cookie dough will ease out of the cookie gun best at room temperature. Plan ahead and take all of your ingredients out and let them hit room temperature before mixing up the dough and you will be ready to go.

How to Use the Cookie Press

St. Patty's Day Spritz Cookies
St. Patty's Day Spritz Cookies

Cookie Press Vanilla Butter Cookie Recipe

This recipe, unlike a dry crisp butter cookie, is moist and delicious thanks to the addition of vegetable oil. I feel that the oil keeps the cookie dough moist while working with it and acts as a super lubricant to help this cookie ease from the cookie press as you are making your creations. The flavor is wonderful. These cookies are a big hit.

Ingredients:

1 cup sugar

1 cup powdered sugar

1 cup butter (unsalted at room temperature)

1 cup vegetable or canola oil

2 eggs (room temperature)

4 1/2 cups unbleached white flour

1 tsp. baking soda

1 tsp. cream of tartar

1/2 teaspoon salt

2 tsps. pure vanilla extract

Colored sugar to sprinkle on pressed cookies. You can buy colored sugar in the baking aisle at the grocery store. I do not like the texture of the larger sugar granuals that are sold in stores. I color my own granualted sugar ahead of time. Just add one or two drops of food coloring to a 1/2 cup of sugar and mix until the drop of food coloring has been evenly mixed throughout the sugar. You can adjust the color by adding more drops or create your own colors by combining food colorings. Lavender equals two drops of red and two drops of blue. I make a pretty lime green with one drop of green and two drops of yellow. Experiment with the drops. This is just another fun part of the cookie press cookie making process.

Directions;

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Cream together the sugar, powdered sugar, butter and oil. Add the eggs until smooth. Stir in the vanilla extract.

In a separate bowl combine the flour, baking soda, cream of tartar and salt. Mix until evenly distributed.

Slowly add the dry ingredients to the wet creamed mix until the dough is uniform.

Fill your cookie press and shoot cookies evenly on cold ungreased trays. These cookies do not spread too much so the spritz cookies do not have to be placed far apart from each other on trays.

Sprinkle or spoon your colored sugar on top of the cookies before baking.

Bake for 7 to 10 minutes. Store cookies in an airtight container.

This recipe makes approximately 8 dozen spritz cookies.

Almond Spritz Cookies

Substitute 2 tsps. of almond extract for the vanilla extract. Do not top with granualted sugar before baking. Dust with powdered sugar after baking when warm and then once again when cool.

Chocolate Press Cookies

Add 6 tbsps. cocoa powder to the dry ingredients and 2 tsps. of cream to the wet ingredients in the above recipe. Sprinkle uncolored granualted sugar on cookies before baking.

Lemon Poppy Seed Spritzers

Omit the vanilla extract in the above recipe and add 2 tsps. of lemon extract to the wet ingredients. Add 3 tbsps. of poppy seeds to the dry ingredients. Sprinkle cookies with yellow colored sugar before baking.

Peanut Butter Press Cookies

Reduce butter and oil in the above recipe to 2/3 cup each and add 2/3 cup creamy peanut butter. Top cookies with uncolored granulated sugar before baking.

Cinnamon Spritzers

Add two teaspoons of cinnamon to the dry ingredients in the above recipe. Sprinkle cookies with red colored granulated sugar before baking.

Cookie Recipes

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Comments 5 comments

moonlake profile image

moonlake 4 years ago from America

My very favorite cookie. Your right why do we only make them for Christmas. I should make a batch. Enjoyed your hub.


cabmgmnt profile image

cabmgmnt 4 years ago from Northfield, MA Author

moonlake,

Yes, you should make a batch. I am thrilled that you enjoyed the hub...let me know how your cookies turn out ;)


peachpurple profile image

peachpurple 3 years ago from Home Sweet Home

Gosh! Lots of lovely recipe ideas. I love the cookie press recipe you have included. Can i reduce the sugar into 1/2 since the icing sugar is used? Seems like too much sugar. Thanks for sharing


cabmgmnt profile image

cabmgmnt 3 years ago from Northfield, MA Author

Peach Purple,

You may try to reduce the sugar but I have a feeling the texture will be different and that the cookie dough will stick as you are squeezing it through the press.


Susie Ocala Florida 5 weeks ago

I have been making Spritz Cookies for over 42 Years.Just after My Daughter Tammy Was Born. My Mother in Law Gave me Her Recipe and other cookie ideas as well. I Love To Bake more Then I Cook. Every Year before the Holidays everyone is asking me What kind of Cookies are you making this year or Are you Making Spritz Cookies. I have all ready made cookies and put in freezer. Last Years I made over 1500 Cookies of Just One Kind. That's another type of Cookie I got 42 years ago as well. I Make Cookies for all my family's in Illinois. As well as Friends and Neighbors here in Florida. I Had Cookies and Fudge (which everyone asks for that too) and Breads too. It's ALOT of Work but it's all Worth it to see everyone's face when they get all the Goodies to enjoy. And yes I am going to make the Spritz Cookies more often. Have a Wonderful Holiday and A Happy New Year. Susie Ocala Florida

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