Eggless Cake: How to Bake a Fruit Cake Without Eggs

Cook Time

Prep time: 20 min
Cook time: 1 hour 10 min
Ready in: 1 hour 30 min
Yields: One 18cm (7 inch) diameter fruit cake

Maybe you've run out, or perhaps you're allergic, or there could be a shortage—if eggs are not an option, it is possible to bake a cake without.

This eggless recipe is made in a similar way to ginger cake, whereby some of the ingredients are melted in a pan.

Color and texture are also similar, which makes it ideal for the winter months—especially Christmas.

If you want a more versatile cake, replace the cinnamon and nutmeg with 50g (2 oz) of chopped candied peel and a few drops of almond or vanilla extract, and add with the melted ingredients in step five below. Instead of black tea, use rose hip tea for an interesting color and fruitier flavor, or an infusion of fresh lemon balm. You could also increase the quantity of lemon zest or exchange it for orange zest.

Ingredients

  • 280ml (*1/2 pint) weak black tea, cold
  • 75g (3 oz) butter
  • 75g (3 oz) sugar
  • 75g (3 oz) dried, mixed fruit
  • 1 level teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
  • 280g (10 oz) self-raising flour (add 2 level teaspoons baking powder if using plain or all-purpose flour)
  • 3 level teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 level teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
  • Pinch salt

*If using US pints, the exact measurement is 0.600475 pints, or just a little over 1/2 pint.

Instructions

1. Pour the tea into a small pan together with the butter, sugar, dried fruit and lemon zest.

2. Cook over a low flame until the butter is melted, stirring occasionally.

3. Set aside to cool a little.

Cooking the butter, sugar, dried fruit and lemon zest.
Cooking the butter, sugar, dried fruit and lemon zest.

4. Sieve the flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt into a mixing bowl.

5. Make a well in the center of the bowl and pour in the tea and fruit etc., then beat with a wooden spoon until the mixture is of a sticky, viscous consistency.

Beat with a wooden spoon until the mixture is of a sticky, viscous consistency.
Beat with a wooden spoon until the mixture is of a sticky, viscous consistency.

6. Pour the mixture into a greased 18cm (7 inch) round cake pan, and place in a moderate oven, 180 C (350 F, Gas Mark 4), for 1 hour and 10 minutes.

Pour the mixture into a well greased 18 cm cake tin.
Pour the mixture into a well greased 18 cm cake tin.

7. Remove from the oven and turn out onto a cooling rack.

Turn out onto a cooling rack.
Turn out onto a cooling rack.

As with most cakes made using the melting method, it's best to leave for at least one day before cutting.

Cast your vote for Eggless Fruit Cake

© 2015 Camlo De Ville

More by this Author


Comments 2 comments

DzyMsLizzy profile image

DzyMsLizzy 16 months ago from Oakley, CA

Very interesting! I often wondered what to use in place of eggs for vegan cake recipes. What else would be the binder?

I have a family recipe handed down for an "eggless, milkless, butterless" cake; it's also a type of fruit cake, but it came from the era of the Great Depression in the lste 1920s, when people were very likely to find themselves in short supply of many staples.

Voted up, interesting, useful and pinned.


camlo profile image

camlo 16 months ago from Cologne, Germany Author

Thank you, DzyMsLizzy! I think there were a lot of recipes like this during the Great Depression and WWII (in Britain) when many foods were rationed - including eggs, butter and milk. They can still be very useful, especially for people with allergies or who prefer a vegan diet, as you mention. Luckily, I'm able to eat anything, but find it fascinating to experiment with this sort of thing.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    camlo profile image

    Camlo De Ville (camlo)252 Followers
    11 Articles

    Camlo began his career in the hospitality industry acquiring culinary skills in the kitchen, which he now puts to good use in home cookery.



    Click to Rate This Article
    working