Make Perfect Hard Cooked Deviled Eggs, Hard Boiled Eggs

Eggs

Fresh Eggs
Fresh Eggs | Source

Hard Cooked, Not Boiled!

When we think about the inevitable edible egg, scrambled, over easy, Benedict and baked, nothing seems to be more versatile than the egg when it has been hard-cooked. Yes. I said hard "cooked." It is never hard-boiled! (well, it is if you are referring to some cheesy detective in some cheesy film). NEVER ACTUALLY BOIL AN EGG, unless your goal is to make rubbery whites that bounce with garish green yolks.

It All Starts With the Chickens

The best eggs start with the best egg laying chickens!
The best eggs start with the best egg laying chickens! | Source

Why all of the Fuss Over Cooking Eggs?

The fuss is chemistry, the chemistry of the protein rich, low calorie, and very low (1.5 grams) saturated fat egg. It is a true miracle, the cooking of an egg; and here is why...

  • The longer and more vigorously you cook the protein of an egg, the tighter this protein binds together, causing more water to be squeezed out. "I would rather make toast from bread than create eggs as dry as toast".
  • Unless your goal is making green eggs (and ham) then turn down the veracity of boiling to your eggs. The drab-green chalky yolk results from hideously high heat being applied to your eggs.
  • The iron in the yolk combines with the sulfur in the white of the egg causing the creation of iron sulfide. The longer you boil your eggs, the greater the chance of this disaster occurring. Be gentle with your eggs and your taste buds and pallet will be rewarded.

The Best Way to Hard Cook (not Hard Boil) Eggs

Here's the scoop and the best way I have discovered to hard-cook an egg; ever. This method yields creamy, easily-blended, green-free yolks, and whites that don't bounce if you drop them on the counter. (This method is also suggested by the American Egg Board).

The Brain Power Found In Eggs

When improved memory is your intent, try eating a couple of eggs. Two eggs offer 100% of the daily requirement of choline, which is critical to brain development and memory!

How To Cook An Egg In The Shell

  1. Place the eggs in a saucepan in a single layer (never stack them, jam too many in, or overcrowd the pan).
  2. Cover these eggs in cold water until it measures about 1" above the top of the eggs.
  3. Put the pan on the stove and heat water until it just comes to a full boil.
  4. Take the pan off of the heat promptly and place a cover on it.
  5. Walk away. Just walk away.
  6. Don't come back until 15 minutes has passed.
  7. Upon your return, run the eggs under cold water after completely draining the hot water from the pot.

Egg Cooking Technique

Electric Egg Cookers

Electric egg cookers are available on the market, which hard-cook your egg using steam by pouring a little water into the base. These are easy to use—push a button and return when you hear the timer go off. If you can forfeit the counter space it takes to place one of these upon, something that ONLY cooks eggs (about seven or eight at a time) only then should you buy one. For me, I won't put a single use appliance on my precious surface space, unless it makes coffee. (I know what you're thinking, what about the toaster? Well, I can make toast, muffins, bagels and many more toasty things with it, making it technically a multipurpose appliance...okay, back to eggs!) I instead prefer to use the tried-and-true stove top method.

NOTE: Egg cookers would be great if you wanted to include kids in the egg making process—they won't be around pots of super-hot (but not boiling) water.

What You Think Really Does Matter!

Would you ever consider raising hens for your own fresh eggs?

  • Sounds really fun, and fresh eggs every day would be wonderful!
  • No way! Eggs come from the supper market, and that's all I need to know!
  • Maybe, if knew more about how to do it.
See results without voting

How to Center an Egg Yolk

A Guaranteed Centered Egg Yolk

Some say shaking the egg prior to cooking it will center your yolk, but this is also said to lack consistency, working less often than not. If you purchase an egg rack—designed for this purpose—the eggs cook up-righted and yield centered yolks for the most part. However, if it's a guarantee you're looking for, if your chefly reputation depends on a yolk that is centered bulls-eye in your hard-cooked egg; at least 8 hours before you plan to cook your eggs, reach into your refrigerator and lay (a little egg humor) the carton of eggs on its long side.

How Much Cholesterol is in an Egg

One egg contains 215 milligrams of cholesterol which landed it in on the bad-food list until more research was done that showed that the culprit in every diet is the amount of saturated fat one consumes, not the cholesterol. Since one egg only has 1.5 grams of saturated fat, enjoy eggs guilt free!

Keeping Cooked Eggs in the Refrigerator

Okay, the eggs are done cooking (not boiling), you've run them under cold water immediately upon removing them from the stove—no less than 5 minutes under the cold water—a nice plunge into a bowl of ice works great for the same duration of time. The idea is to get the heat reduced quickly so the yolk won't turn drab green, the faster you get them to cool, the less likely they are to have a green chalky yolk.

How Long Do Cooked Eggs Stay Fresh in the Refrigerator?

An unpeeled hard-cooked egg keeps up to 10 days in the refrigerator. I recommend storing them in a plastic zip-sealed bag to keep unwanted flavors from permeating the eggs very porous shell. It helps keep the egg aroma (sulfur smell) from wafting out at you each time you open the fridge door. This method gets your eggs ready for deviling at a moments notice! Eggs are such a wonderful food!

Hens fed a diet of alfalfa, yellow corn and grass yield an egg with a lighter-colored yolk than those hens that are fed a wheat diet.

HOW MUCH DO YOU KNOW ABOUT EGGS?

WARNING: Easter Eggs Safety

Drop that Easter Egg, Lady!

Now that the eggs are cooked-hard, the whites are tender, the yolks are creamy and green-free, we must consider the length of time that we can safely keep them before they pass their prime. Consider Easter eggs, they get decorated yielding an abundant quantity of the oval delicacies. They are cooked, decorated, hidden and if we are lucky, located and put in a basket with all of the other eggs of the day. This would seem to make for the perfect opportunity to make every body's favorite hard-cooked delight, the deviled-egg!

STOP! Put down the Easter Eggs. Do Not make this mistake!

Egg Safety According to Food Safety Experts

  1. you don't stand a chance in heck of keeping your creamy egg jewels safe for consumption in the Easter Egg Hunt scenario.
  2. Hard-cooked eggs are safe at room temperature for only two (that's 2) hours.
  3. By the time you gather all of the eggs you hid in the sunshine after the kids missed them during the hunt, you are going to be well into the danger zone of food safety.
  4. If you simply can't stand this waste (and who could) then I suggest that you buy plastic eggs to hide while keeping the decorated version safely cooled in the fridge.
  5. Create the deviled egg stuffing with these colored cool eggs. Unlike the sun-ladened hunted eggs, these remain free of nasty bacteria, which saves you a co-pay at the emergency room.

Three top Cooked Egg Tips

How to cook and peel an egg easily
How to cook and peel an egg easily | Source

How to Peel an Egg the Easy Way...Yea Right!

The Best Way to Peel a Cooked Egg

Before you can use the hard-cooked egg, it must be peeled. So, peel we shall! Over the years I have peeled many hundreds, and more likely thousands of hard-cooked eggs. One undeniable fact remains true, it is hit-and-miss when it comes to an easy peeling egg. Isn't there an effective egg peeling device that can swiftly remove the peel in an instant? I mean really, who wouldn't buy one? I would actually buy such a device, even as it would be the one and only single use device in my kitchen! Nothing that actually works has landed on the market as far as I am concerned. This means that the best way, remains the manual way. And again, it is a hit-and-miss task.

The fresher the egg the more difficult it is to peel.

This is the absolute truth! It is the truth because there is a void of air between the shell and the egg that is divided by a very thin air cell-membrane. This void resides at the large end of the egg. The fresher the egg is, the smaller this void is, thus leaving no room to get a finger hold to start the peeling process smoothly. When the egg gets older, this void expands making it easier to start peeling your egg. But time is a tricky partner, as if you wait too long you'll end up with a dried-out egg.

Best Egg-age for Hard Boiling

A good rule to follow is (also suggested by the American Egg Board) to use refrigerated eggs that are aged 7 to 10 days. This offers the best combination of good quality and easy peeling.

Easy Egg Peeling Pointers

It's All About Technique From Here On

  • You want to crack the egg all over by rolling it between your hand and the counter.
  • Moderate pressure is best allowing the egg to crack and loosen the shell from the white.
  • Begin to peel at the large end, wish for a good-sized air-cell, and above all remain patient.
  • Peeling while you hold an egg under a stream of water helps the bits of broken shell to be washed away as you peel it.

Now that the eggs are cooked perfect, and peeled smoothly, you are ready to make the traditional deviled egg cut.

How to Properly Peel and Cut an Egg for Stuffing

Salt-experts claim that adding salt to the cooking liquid for eggs will make them easier to peel.
Salt-experts claim that adding salt to the cooking liquid for eggs will make them easier to peel.

How To Cut Cooked Eggs For Deviled Eggs

Don't You Do it... Don't You Cut That Egg the Wrong Way!

Some people will bisect the egg, cutting it on its smallest circumference. This could NOT be more wrong! This will give you a deviled egg that looks short and awkward with a seemingly smaller void for the creamy egg yolk stuffing. They are also more likely to fall over, even when you trim a flat end for them to sit upon (adding another step between you and eating them).

Make Egg Sailboats not Egg Life Rafts

The only right and true way to cut your deviled eggs is lengthwise; like little sailboats filled with savory scrumptiousness. If you are adamant about a bisect cut, go for it, it takes all kinds and the taste will be the same. But, don't say I didn't warn you when the deviled-egg police show up at your picnic to cite you for an illegal pres"egg"tation!

How Would You Rate the Best Classic American-Style Deviled Eggs

4 stars from 2 ratings of Classic American-Style Deviled Egg Recipe

The Best Classic Deviled Egg Recipe

The classic deviled-egg recipe has been debated in families for generations. So in an attempt to offer the most classic and traditional recipe, I am taking you to a place complete with American history. A truly perfect combination of creamy, tart, salty and slightly pungent goodness we refer to as the American deviled-egg. To replicate this delight will bring you high praise from family and friends, because no one can resist the beauty of a truly classically traditional deviled egg!

*For the best and most traditional results, be certain to keep the stuffing mixture very creamy and smooth, like grandma used to make!

Deviled Eggs

Classic Deviled Egg Recipe
Classic Deviled Egg Recipe | Source

How Many Eggs Does a Chicken Lay?

A hen lays 250 to 300 eggs annually. There are about 240 million laying hens in the United States, making the egg one of the top sustainable food sources...in the world!

Unique Deviled Egg Carriers and Trays!

Ingredients for Deviled Egg Recipe

  • 6 hard-cooked eggs, peeled and sliced in half (length wise) and the yolks mashed in a bowl
  • 2 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons of mayonnaise
  • 3/4 tablespoon prepared yellow mustard (if you prefer a less vinegary flavor, only use ½ tablespoon of the prepared mustard)
  • 2 teaspoons of Kosher pickle brine (this is the secret to those perfect classically creamy deviled eggs)
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt (add more or less to taste)
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper (add more or less to taste)
  • Paprika for garnish

Instructions

  1. Cream together the thoroughly mashed yolks and mayonnaise
  2. Stir in the mustard and brine
  3. Stir in the salt and pepper
  4. Taste for seasoning - small amount of any ingredient as needed (you can always add more)
  5. Mix all ingredients together making stuffing very creamy
  6. Fill the halved egg whites with the mixture evenly
  7. Garnish each stuffed egg-half with a sprinkle of paprika

Allow the deviled-eggs to set in your refrigerator for a couple of hours before serving (covered or sealed in a deviled egg container). If you just can't wait, and who can, enjoy them right away! But knowing that the ingredients blend together making these lovelies far better in a couple of hours, may cause you to save a few for later!

Eggshells are an outstanding source of calcium, so throw them in the compost heap instead of the trash!

More by this Author


Comments for "The Best Hard Boiled Eggs Tips" 20 comments

Kristen Howe profile image

Kristen Howe 17 months ago from Northeast Ohio

Great tips on how to hard boil eggs, which has been hit and miss for me with the timing. I would love to do deviled eggs real soon. Voted up for useful!


Auntie D profile image

Auntie D 5 years ago from California

Great article on eggs and good explanation the peeling of one. I hope some restaurant cooks will read your hub and learn to be gentle when they prepare hard cooked, scrambled or fried eggs.


K9keystrokes profile image

K9keystrokes 6 years ago from Northern, California Author

LeanMan~I thought of you the moment I wrote the second word in the title! Thanks for the read.

K9


LeanMan profile image

LeanMan 6 years ago from At the Gemba

I have to stop reading, I am hungry.. Thanks for the hub.


K9keystrokes profile image

K9keystrokes 6 years ago from Northern, California Author

Money Glitch~HI! What a super pointer to tap a crack in the eggs as they cool to let out the sulfur! I am adding this tip to my list! Thanks for the comments, they are greatly appreciated! Thanks for taking the time from your hugely busy 60DC2 schedule!

K9

livelonger!~Always pleased when the tips are confirmed! Thank you for the read and for stopping by, love to see you in the comments sections, even on a hub about eggs!

K9

wavegirl22~Hey thanks! What an honor to have you stroll by and comment on my humble little hub! I am so thankful!One of my favorite foods is the deviled egg, what a yummy addition to any snack tray! I hope your egg results are perfection!

K9

prettydarkhorse~I am glad you found a bit of information to take away with you. Thank you for making the trip over here to comment, it means the world!

K9

kaltopsyd~Hi Kim! So happy to see you read my hub. Glad you found a smile within the information, something I am always willing to share with you! Your comments bring me a smile as well! Big thanks for the comments!

K9


kaltopsyd profile image

kaltopsyd 6 years ago from Trinidad originally, but now in the USA

"Walk Away. Just walk away." haha. That made me laugh. Great tips though. I should try that. Now I feel like eating deviled eggs! :D


prettydarkhorse profile image

prettydarkhorse 6 years ago from US

Nice one, you shared it all to us I have learned a lot from this hub, I now know that the fresher the eggs the more difficult to crack it -- Thanks, Maita


wavegirl22 profile image

wavegirl22 6 years ago from New York, NY

K9keystrokes- I agree with livelonger - a great hub all around! I am going to have to try to see if I too can get creamy eggs- just the sound of it sounds delicous. Love you peeling egg tips too:)


livelonger profile image

livelonger 6 years ago from San Francisco

What an awesome hub! And yes, your trick for cooking eggs yields yolks that are bright yellow and soft, not green and chalky. :-)


Money Glitch profile image

Money Glitch 6 years ago from Texas

Great K9, your instructions are exactly the way I hard cook my eggs. One trick that I have learned to keep the green off the yolks is to rinse the eggs in cool water immediately after cooked.

Then while the eggs are still in the cool water take a fork and crack the shell. Has something to do with chemistry: the sulfur that is in an egg is being released into the water instead of the air. Don't know exactly why it works, but it does. :) Thumbs up!


K9keystrokes profile image

K9keystrokes 6 years ago from Northern, California Author

Wendy Krick~Thanks for hopping over here to read the hub. You are right, the aluminum foil is messy and can leave a slightly metalic residue on the egg stuffing. Appreciate the comments!

K9


Wendy Krick profile image

Wendy Krick 6 years ago from Maryland

I love devil ages. Those carriers are nice. Much better than aluminum foil.


K9keystrokes profile image

K9keystrokes 6 years ago from Northern, California Author

Wow. Thank you everyone for stopping by and taking in a few pointers on hard-cooked eggs!

...Hilariuos Chaz--cad--too funny!

Nothing is better than the creamy tangy deviled egg! So glad many of you were able to gain a bit of new info, and that those who are egg savvy could confirm the correctness of the best advice written within the hub.

Appreciate the read from each of you...back to the 60dc2!

~Always choose love~

K9


Jane@CM profile image

Jane@CM 6 years ago

I never knew exactly how long I could keep hard boiled eggs in the fridge - and you answered my question. Greats ideas! j.


Tom_Radford profile image

Tom_Radford 6 years ago from London

wow! There's a whole lot of new egg ideas in my head now. I love eggs! I'll give some of this a go. Good hub!


humagaia profile image

humagaia 6 years ago from United Kingdom

Wow you live and learn. Why did my mother not know this and teach me. To think I have been living with having to eat green-centred, bouncy hard-BOILED eggs for over 50 years.

And now you tell me!

How to hard-COOK an egg for that creamy white, reboundless exterior and that perfectly centred golden yellow interior.

You cad.

Now I am going to regret all those wasted, countless eggs that I did not do justice to. I boiled them to within a whisker of producing perfect specimens that could be used as golf balls.

I am off to try out my new found skill-set for the perfect egg. Next, a recipe for perfect toast is needed.

Oh and one for perfect egg mayonnaise. Any chance?

Pretty please!


viking305 profile image

viking305 6 years ago from Ireland

Yes I love my boiled eggs too. They are great with a salad or in a sandwich. I crumble them up and add mayonaise to them then add to my bread, very tasty indeed.


bayoulady profile image

bayoulady 6 years ago from Northern Louisiana,USA

Wow! wish I'd have thoyght of a hub on eggs! What a good idea, and it was very interesting. I boil my eggs for about ten minutes and then turn them off. I will certainly use your method, as that will save electricity!


Pandoras Box profile image

Pandoras Box 6 years ago from A Seemingly Chaotic World

The secrets to hard-cooked eggs took me years to crack! You got it all right here, though. Very useful.


pakpub profile image

pakpub 6 years ago from Ohio

I love to make deviled eggs. The yellow mustard makes them very tasty. Nice hub.

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