Filet Mignon with Gorgonzola and Balsamic-Dijon Sauce

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February 14 is just a few days away. Going out for dinner is easy--but it's also expensive, crowded, and stressful. With just a bit of pre-planning, you can make a memorable meal for you and your loved one.

Here's a suggestion for the main course (beef) that is easy, inexpensive, and tasty.

Equipment you will need

  • Sharp knife
  • Toothpicks
  • Heavy oven-safe skillet or saute pan
  • Instant-read thermometer
  • Platter
  • aluminum foil

Cook Time

Prep time: 5 min
Cook time: 15 min
Ready in: 20 min
Yields: 2 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 filets of beef
  • salt and pepper
  • 2 strips uncooked bacon
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons Gorgonzola cheese, crumbled
  • 1/4 cup beef broth
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  1. Inspect your steaks for any silver skin or fat that was left around the outside edge. Use a sharp knife to remove it without removing any meat.
  2. Season the meat before you wrap it with bacon. Just keep it simple and use sea salt and and fresh-cracked black pepper. Rub the seasoning in gently on all sides just before cooking.
  3. Wrap a piece of bacon firmly around the steak. Don't make it too tight. Stick a toothpick through the overlapping portion to keep the bacon in place.
  4. Preheat your oven to 400 degrees F.
  5. Heat a heavy, oven-safe saute pan over medium-high heat. Add the olive oil to the pan and then quickly add your filets and turn the heat down to medium. Reduce the heat to medium and cook until browned--about 3 minutes per side.
  6. You will finish your steaks in the oven, medium rare to medium (145 degrees F to 160 degrees F. This should take about 5 minutes for a 1-inch filet. Keep your instant-read thermometer handy.
  7. As soon as the filets are cooked to desired doneness, remove them to a platter, top with the crumbled gorgonzola, and cover with a tent of foil to keep warm.
  8. Add the broth, balsamic, and mustard to the same pan in which the filets were cooked. Bring to medium-high heat on your stove-top. Heat to boiling, stirring constantly and scraping until browned bits are dissolved and mixture reduces slightly. Spoon sauce over the filets and serve.

What is filet mignon?

A filet is a boneless cut of meat or fish. Mignon is a French word which means dainty or cute. Thus filet mignon (fih-LAY meen-YAWN) is a dainty filet. Filet mignon comes from the small end of the tenderloin (called the short loin) which is found on the back rib cage of the animal. This area of the animal is not weight-bearing; in fact it does not move much at all and so is an extremely tender cut of meat,

The filet is also very lean, which means that it can dry out quickly if not cooked properly. And with little fat it is less flavorful than a marbled steak so it is often served with a sauce.


What is Gorgonzola?

Gorgonzola is one of the world's oldest blue-veined cheeses. It is a cow's milk cheese produced in the northern Italy regions of Lombardy and Piedmont. Gorgonzola has a crumbly and soft texture and can be mild to sharp depending on the length of time it has been aged.


© 2014 Carb Diva

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Comments 2 comments

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Carb Diva 2 years ago Author

VVanNess - Thank you for your kind words. I agree about steak and bacon--and then with cheese you have the trifecta! By the way, if you don't care for Gorgonzola you could use another blue cheese, or perhaps Feta. I hope to post some other recipes to turn this into a meal. "Stay tuned".


VVanNess profile image

VVanNess 2 years ago from Prescott Valley

Yum!! My husband will be commenting later to thank you for this incredible recipe! He's going to be so thrilled to get this for dinner, maybe Valentine's Day. How can you go wrong with steak and bacon?! Thank you!

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