BLACK WALNUT Cookie Recipe - A Specialty of Gramma Morgan

Black Walnut Cookies

LIGHTLY browned at the edges, these black walnut cookies have just come from the oven.
LIGHTLY browned at the edges, these black walnut cookies have just come from the oven. | Source

My Gramma Morgan

Families create rituals and warm memories for their children which last beyond lifetimes. Such is the case with my formidable Gramma Anna Morgan. Born at the beginning of the twentieth century, she raised five children during the Great Depression. She kept house in a solid brick home on Fourth Avenue, Altoona, Pa. which had no electricity - instead gaslights and kerosene lanterns. Wash day (laundry day) was as back breaking, complicated, and long as all the nursery rhymes purport. Yet, through all this she "loved up" my father and his siblings. One of the ways she showed her love was with her Christmas cookies.

The Family Recipe

The original recipe handed down to me from my mother.  (Quantities are doubled - the Morgans are a big family.)
The original recipe handed down to me from my mother. (Quantities are doubled - the Morgans are a big family.) | Source

Kitchen Fragrances Can Take Us Back in Time

In a very good way, the sense of smell triggers memories of the far past. The fragrance of food associated with happy periods acts as a time machine. Understandably, my father requests one of his mother’s special Christmastime cookies as we gather each year for the holiday. It is a fabulous cookie. Although Gramma called them “Clifford Tea Cookies,” I have renamed them to honor her. You can almost see her bustling around in her kitchen as you smell and nibble them.

Essential Ingredient: Black Walnuts and Extract

Take the time to buy these.  You will love it.
Take the time to buy these. You will love it. | Source

Black Walnuts are Very Distinctive


Please – if you consider trying this recipe and use “regular walnuts,” it will not be the same cookie. It will not necessarily be a BAD cookie, but it won’t be this wonderful black walnut one. I recommend that one takes the time to purchase black walnuts and black walnut extract.

Last year, my extract was used up. A few days before Christmas, I started a mildly frantic search for more. Apparently, black walnut extract is not as ubiquitous as it once was. Many Internet searches and phone calls were required before I located a kindly professional baker who sold me a bottle of her extra-strength professional black walnut extract. That was her Christmas gift to my family!

Ingredients


(This produces about 3-1/2 to 4 dozen cookies.)

¾ cup butter, softened

1 and 1/8 cup of firmly packed brown sugar

1 egg

1 teaspoon black walnut extract

1 and ½ cups white flour

½ teaspoon baking SODA (not “baking powder”)

1 cup chopped black walnuts

Procedure:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.

Put the butter in a large mixing bowl and soften by letting it stand out (or modern way: by microwaving on VERY LOW for 10 seconds.)

The butter, softened.
The butter, softened. | Source
Brown sugar is added.
Brown sugar is added. | Source

Add the brown sugar and cream them together.

Then add the egg and black walnut extract to the bowl and beat together.

More Cookie Ingredients

One egg.
One egg. | Source
Get the powder called Baking SODA.
Get the powder called Baking SODA. | Source


On top of the wet mixture in the bowl, pour ONLY 1 cup of the flour.

Then sprinkle the ½ teaspoon of baking soda all over it. Mix the two dry ingredients together a little with a spatula or spoon. Then add the remaining ½ cup of flour on top.

Stir everything together gently with a spoon to get it wet. If you use an electric mixer first, you will probably have flour flying all over your kitchen.

Beat together until thoroughly mixed.

Then drop by teaspoon onto a cookie sheet with about 1 and ¼ inches between the cookies.

Ready to Bake

Size and spacing of the cookies before they go into the oven.
Size and spacing of the cookies before they go into the oven. | Source


Set a timer for 8 minutes and STAY in or near the kitchen! No multi-tasking is permitted if it takes you too far from the oven. (Been there, burned those.)

Check the cookies at 8 minutes. With my oven, they needed 10 minutes of backing time and they also might need 12 minutes in your oven. When they are lightly brown at the edges remove the cookies.

What "ready to take out" looks like

The edges should be lightly browned.  Obviously, my Gramma did not use parchment paper under the cookies, but you can add that feature if you wish.
The edges should be lightly browned. Obviously, my Gramma did not use parchment paper under the cookies, but you can add that feature if you wish. | Source

After the cookies have cooled for 2 to 5 minutes, use a metal turner to remove them from the cookie sheet. Enjoy these strong sweet walnut cookies!

My Gramma would have beaten all the ingredients by hand and they always were thoroughly blended. That humbles me.

A marker502 Fourth Avenue Altoona PA -
502 4th Ave, Altoona, PA 16602, USA
[get directions]

Where Dad was born.

Photos and text copyright 2011 Maren E. Morgan, all rights reserved.

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Comments 5 comments

randomcreative profile image

randomcreative 4 years ago from Milwaukee, Wisconsin

You are definitely right that smells can take you way back in the past! Thanks for sharing this wonderful recipe. I've never used black walnuts for baking before, but I'll have to give it a try sometime.


B.T. 4 years ago

How do you think cashews would work? Is there such a thing as cashew extract?


Maren Morgan M-T profile image

Maren Morgan M-T 4 years ago from Pennsylvania Author

I just heard that one of my aunts hasn't had these cookies for a long time. I am going to bake some and send them her way.


adrienne2 profile image

adrienne2 4 years ago from Atlanta

Hi Maren, I was reading through your recipe wasn't sure if it was one I was going to try. You got me at strong and sweet, gonna try it! Thanks for sharing with the HP community. Voted up and useful!


Maren Morgan M-T profile image

Maren Morgan M-T 4 years ago from Pennsylvania Author

@BT - cashews? Sounds interesting. I might be tempted to use half white sugar and half brown sugar with that.

@adrienne2 - thanks. Let me know how you like them.

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