Honey Wine Winery (Meadery)

It looks a little strange, but I'll give it a go.
It looks a little strange, but I'll give it a go. | Source

Meadery (Honey Wine Maker)

Wine has been made by fermenting honey in water since approximately 7000 BC. Although many Americans drink wine from grapes, the art forms of craft brewing and wine making are becoming popular again. Thus, there is a market for old-fashioned honey wine, also long known as “mead.” Happily, many varieties of mead and its derivatives are now made in eastern Pennsylvania.

What is Mead’s History?

It sounds Biblical or Kings-and-Queens-ish, whether new Goth or historically accurate. Most people, however, would be hard-pressed to supply details about it.

Mead was enjoyed by ancient Egyptians, Norse Vikings, English royalty and Celts. Shakespeare, Chaucer, and Homer are among the writers who have referred to it. Some feel thjat it may be the oldest alcoholic beverage on earth, occurring naturally.

According to Stonekeep Meadery:

“Mead fell out of favor in about the 12th century due to heavy taxation and regulations on the ingredients used to make alcoholic beverages. Because honey was such a prized commodity it was expensive and mostly only consumed by royalty. In addition, with the start of voyages to the new world, and the discovery of sugar cane, honey was no longer necessary as a sweetener.”

Types of Meads

Basic or “pure” mead is honey diluted with water and fermented with yeast. When fruit, spices or malt are added, the subcategory name changes. For example, Melomel (Mel'-o-mel) is the subcategory name of mead made by fermenting fruit or fruit juice along with the honey. Metheglyn (Me-theg'-lin) is mead with herbs and/or spices added. Then there is Braggot (Brag'-got), a drink made with honey and malt, more or less a mead-beer. The alcohol content of these varies from low to very high.

Stonekeep Meadery's Modern Twists

Stonekeep uses sulfites in its production to deter bacterial growth. The mead bottle labels carry the Contains Sulfites warning.

It offers this explanation:

“Virtually all wines and meads contain some level of sulfites. A small amount of sulfites are naturally produced during the fermentation process.

“Mead is a medieval drink! Aren't you destroying the legacy if you add sulfites?

“The addition of sulfites (by one method or another) is not a new concept. In the middle ages, to help sterilize their oak barrels, wine makers and mead makers would burn strips of sulfur inside the barrel (a process that is still practiced by some today). The effect of this was to allow the Sulfur Doixide (sulfites) given off during this process to permeate the wood of the barrel, inhibiting the growth of wild yeast, bacteria and other nasty stuff. This sulfur dioxide would then find its way into the wine and help preserve it as well. Modernly, winemakers can achieve this effect chemically.”

Also, Stonekeep Meadery ages all of its meads in stainless steel tanks, not oak barrels. There are no artificial colors or flavors in its meads.

Locations Where Stonekeep Mead is Sold

Stonekeep Meadery does not have a tasting room yet, and it keeps its location a secret. However, its incorporation address is in Birdsboro, PA and the restaurants listed below are all in southeastern Pennsylvania. Thus, a location near Birdsboro, Mohnton, or Morgantown would be a very reasonable guess.


Locations Selling Stonekeep Meadery Products

Bethlehem Brewworks
Bethlehem
PA
Allentown Brewworks
Allentown
PA
Teresa’s Café
Wayne
PA
Frecon Farms
Boyertown
PA
Bube’s Brewery
Mount Joy
PA
Slyfox Brewpub
Phoenixville
PA

Locations

show route and directions
A markerBethlehem PA -
Bethlehem, PA, USA
[get directions]

B markerAllentown PA -
Allentown, PA, USA
[get directions]

C markerWayne PA -
Wayne Manor, 105 Runnymede Ave, Wayne, PA 19087, USA
[get directions]

D markerBoyertown PA -
Boyertown, PA 19512, USA
[get directions]

E markerPhoenixville PA -
Phoenixville, PA, USA
[get directions]

F markerManheim PA -
Manheim, PA 17545, USA
[get directions]

Medieval Wine Glasses

medieval unicorn wine glass gothic mystical goblet New
medieval unicorn wine glass gothic mystical goblet New

If you arre a unicorn fancier, this may be your cup of mead! lol

 
Set of 2 Gothic Medieval Dragon Goblet Fantasy Glasses
Set of 2 Gothic Medieval Dragon Goblet Fantasy Glasses

Would that today's problems be as easy to solve as slaying a dragon or two!

 

Flavors and Types of Stonekeep Meadery Meads


Following were some of the offerings of the 2012 season:


Honey Mead


Dry and Semi-sweet Black Currant Melomels


Blueberry, Blackberry, Raspberry, Elderberry Strawberry Melomels


Apple Mead (Cyser)


Hibiscus Metheglyn


I will be searching for more meaderies. I suspect that there is one in western Pennsylvania.

Photo and text copyright 2012 Maren E. Morgan.


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Comments 6 comments

rjsadowski profile image

rjsadowski 4 years ago

Interesting Hub although I don't expect to drink any.


amerben 4 years ago

How do you like the flavor? I had some Mead in a gift shop in Battle, England a few years ago (the scene of the Battle of Hastings in 1066 in which William the Conquerer won by outsmarting the Saxons - the town of Hastings is actually a few miles away) and didn't care for it at all. Rather have a pint of good ol' warm British beer. But to each his/her own.

B.T.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 4 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

I've never tasted mead, but I've been interested in trying it for a long time. I didn't know that there different varieties of mead. Thanks for the information!


Maren Morgan M-T profile image

Maren Morgan M-T 4 years ago from Pennsylvania Author

rjsadowski and amerben, I have tasted mead and did not fall in love with it. However, I would be intesested in tasting some of those melomels or metheglyns.

AliciaC - Now you know :)


unknown spy profile image

unknown spy 4 years ago from Neverland - where children never grow up.

hi Alicia..this sounds interesting to me too. :) thanks for sharing


Maren Morgan M-T profile image

Maren Morgan M-T 4 years ago from Pennsylvania Author

unknown spy, let me know when you have tried mead.

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