How To Take Care of Your Cast Iron and the History of It

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History of Cast Iron

Iron has been used since shortly after 2000 BC to make everything from tools and weapons to cookware. They discovered that iron was stronger than bronze when mixed with a bit of carbon. The iron ore is heated in a charcoal fire, releasing the oxygen. This in turn mixes with carbon monoxide to form carbon dioxide. This allows a spongy, porous mass of relatively pure iron to form; mixed with charcoal, and other extraneous matter known as slag. Then they use crushed seashells or limestone to separate the slag out. At this point, the blacksmith would hammer out the slag and other small particles using a hammer on an anvil. This made wrought iron. Wrought means "worked".

At very high temperatures, such as with a forge, the iron begins to absorb carbon rapidly, and the iron starts to melt since the higher carbon content lowers the melting point of iron. The result is cast iron, which contains 3 to 4.5 percent carbon. It is harder and more brittle, making it likely to shatter under heavy blows. This means it can not be shaped at the anvil. It is poured either directly into molds or into 'pig iron' bars, to be remelted later and poured. This is how your cast iron cookware is made.

If you would like to learn more of this process, the following website is a wonderful source of information.

http://www.anselm.edu/homepage/dbanach/h-carnegie-steel.htm

Other things are made with cast iron also. Trivets were made from cast iron to keep pots and dutch oven cookware from burning the wood tables. Spoons, ladles, and other cooking and serving utensils were also made from cast iron. Baking pans were made, allowing a cook to use a wood burning oven to cook with. The temperature to melt the cast iron is so high that you would not likely get your cooking fire anywhere near that hot.

In the mid to late 19th century, cast iron was even used in architecture. It was very popular in New York City for entire facades of buildings. These buildings are endangered and a group in New York is attempting to save them.

http://www.castironnyc.org/history.htm


Curing Your Cast Iron

Caring for your cast iron is not difficult. If you are a cast iron user, you know that if properly seasoned, or cured, it is the first non-stick cookware.This is because a properly cured cast iron pan has grease in the pores of the iron which keep things from sticking. When you heat cast iron, the pores of it open, causing the grease to absorb into the iron.

To cure your cast iron, clean it first. A simple wash in hot water will do. You then want to heat it on a flat baking sheet covered with foil. Heat it for 20 minutes to get it hot. Take it out of the oven and grease the pan with shortening or lard, not oil. Then place it on your cookie sheet, right side up. This way the grease will not drip down into your oven making a mess. Heat it at 350 degrees for 20 minutes. If it smokes, reduce the heat in 15 degree increments until it quits smoking. Give it a little longer if you had to turn the heat down. Let it cool, wipe it with a paper towel, inside and out, put it back on the cookie sheet for a second heating. Upside down this time. Another 20 minutes at 350 degrees and your pan is cured. Using it will add to the non-stick qualities.

Some have suggested that you can use your gas barbecue grill to season it also and that keeps the smoke out of your home. Great idea and I don't know why I never thought of it. This method would work very well.

This does not mean that it will never stick again. This means that from now on, you will be building on your start. The cooking that you do should start building a deep layer of grease in the pan and make it very good at not sticking.


Cast Iron Trivets

An old cast iron trivet.
An old cast iron trivet. | Source
An old cast iron trivet
An old cast iron trivet | Source
An old cast iron trivet.
An old cast iron trivet. | Source
An old cast iron trivet.
An old cast iron trivet. | Source
An old copper trivet.
An old copper trivet. | Source

Cleaning Your Cast Iron

There are two schools of thought on cleaning your cast iron. One is that you just wipe it out and never let it touch water. Soap is a no-no because it will break down your non-stick grease.

The other is that you just use a mild soap in your water and wipe it out. I prefer this method as it cuts down on the chance of cross contamination and gets the flavors of the other foods out of the pan. You would not want your fried chicken to taste like the fish you had the night before. When you finish this method, wipe it down with a paper towel. Then place it on the stove burner on low heat for a few minutes to force any water out. When you get done with this, lightly grease it with oil and put it away.

If you miss some water and your cast iron develops some light rust, use steel wool to scrub it off and then grease and season the pan. If it is not light rust and does not come out with steel wool, use the method below for burning it off. Do not use sandpaper or a steel brush, these can cause grooves and scratches which will hold food particles; making the pan no longer non-stick.

Some people wash them with salt or baking soda. These will also get the flavors of other foods out of them and will help get some crusted in foods out of them.

Do not ever put your cast iron in the dishwasher. It is a hand wash item.

Occasionally, you will goof and burn something into your pan. If it does not come right out, do not put water in it and let it soak. Cast iron does not like that water and will rust. Do not scrape with sharp instruments. That will scratch it and make it stick from then on and food will get in the scrape. Scrub it with steel wool. Not a soaped steel wool pad. If it still does not come out, do not throw it away and do not despair. A trick that I learned from my dad and grandfather is a life saver. It saves a lot of work and money, replacing cast iron is not cheap. Replacing good cast iron is just flat expensive.

They would build a campfire in the back yard in their fire pit. Then they would lay the cast iron right at the edge of the fire and it would burn the food and grease out of the pan. Sit and enjoy your campfire because the food needs time to burn out. When the fire finally burns down, do not take the pan out until it is cool. The next day is soon enough. Then, LIGHTLY tap it with a hammer. The nasty burned in food will drop right out of the pan.

You will have to start over seasoning or curing it but you have saved an expensive pan. I once sold a dutch oven for $150 so they are expensive. They go a lot higher too.

Do you have some cast iron that you use?

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Some Tidbits About Cast Iron

When you cook with your cast iron, remember not to use it for boiling water. Cast iron will rust. If it does rust, sand the rust with steel wool and re-season it.

Do not store food in your cast iron. The acids in the food will attack the surface of it and cause pitting. High acid foods should be gotten out and the pan cleaned immediately.

Use the lid and the even heating of this thick iron will amaze you. The lid keeps the flavors and vitamins in your food. This is also a good cookware to use if you have a low iron count. How else do you think all those people used to get their iron before vitamins. Some of the iron will get into your food and make it even healthier.

When shopping for used cast iron, look for a smooth inner surface. If it is pitted, the food will stick. This is a sign of abuse or low quality. If you find an old piece at a flea market, that is rusty, dirty looking and real cheap, try the burn method. It will get all of that nasty off of it and then sand with steel wool. It will be ready to season before you know it.

It really is amazing how wonderfully useful cast iron is. I love cooking with it. I would prefer to use it as it is such a joy to cook on. People buy new pots and pans every couple of years and do not think anything of it. When you buy cast iron, you will never have to replace it. I still have my grandmothers and it is just like new.

I have a collection of cast iron trivets that I have been collecting for years. I hang them on the wall in the kitchen and when I need one, I just pull it down. They are decorative, useful and handy all at once.

Please remember to vote. I really appreciate the comments that I get on my hubs. They help me see if I am writing useful, interesting, informative hubs. If you would like to use information on these, please ask and please attribute. This is copyrighted work.

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Comments 130 comments

Leroyworld profile image

Leroyworld 4 years ago from Texas, No place else

Great hub. Cast iron cookware really does a great job. Useful information and I am bookmarking this hub


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Leroyworld, I am glad you find this useful. Funny thing is, when I mentioned that I was writing this for a friend that burnt something in her pan, my husband said to stick it in a fire. His dad used to do that. Thank you for coming by to visit.


snakeslane profile image

snakeslane 4 years ago from Canada

I love this Becky! I think your firepit method is a great way to restore a tough to clean cast iron pan...thanks for the reminder. You are so right, these are precious items that deserve good care.

I love the big No. 13 Griswold pan in your photo, and the trivets are beautiful. Good work Katy!

Great hub Becky, thank you. Voted up and useful, interesting and awesome.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

The firepit method is the only way to restore some of them. Dennis cooked a ham in my dutch oven on a firepit and didn't add water to it to keep it from burning. Right over the fire. The ham burnt on an inch thick. I called my dad and he reminded me about putting it in the fire. Said it would be ready to re-season the next morning and it was. Just scoured it out in the stream with sand and got the last little bits of the nasty out. I have seen some that were so thick with grease on the outside that they were dangerous to use. Just throw them in the fire and it cleans all of that out so you can start new.

Katy doesn't like it when I decide the trivets need redone. I make her grease them for me. They looks so pretty when they're freshly done. The copper one, I polish with toothpaste. Best for that.


snakeslane profile image

snakeslane 4 years ago from Canada

I've heard of deckhands being fired on fishing boats for not cleaning cast iron cookware properly, it is serious when there's a big crew to feed.

And the trivets, yes, they need the same kind of care. Rusted iron is not pretty.


Rosemay50 profile image

Rosemay50 4 years ago from Hawkes Bay - NewZealand

Great hub Becky with some useful tips. The firepit method sounds great. I don't use mine very often but after reading this maybe I should use it more.

Thanks for this useful hub and the history was interesting too.

Voted up


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Rosemay, It is great and when you use it all the time, it is non-stick. If you hardly ever use it, it never gets seasoned good and will stick. I am glad you enjoyed the history. I thought it would be interesting to learn where it came from and how long it has been around. Thanks for coming by to visit and for the votes.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

I can imagine a fishing boat full of hungry fishermen without anything to cook in. Food is serious business there and those pans can handle a workload.

My mom used to take a couple of bailed dutch ovens camping and had my dad fix up a hanger for them. He used a couple of pieces of iron and made a fork at each end. Then he would hang a piece of rebar between them and she could hang the bails on that. She would keep a low fire in the fire pit all day and when everybody was ready to eat, a salad and rolls would make a filling and healthy meal.

Yes, the trivets require the same kind of care. I just oiled them today but in a day or two, I will be running them through the oven. I have a couple with painted tiles in them too. Those were my mom's. They can be run through the oven too because they were fired in a kiln.


snakeslane profile image

snakeslane 4 years ago from Canada

Great story Becky. These big cast iron pots and pans have appeared in my life on different occaisions. My neighbor has quite a collection, not used for cooking anymore, but neat to look at. They are just kind of hanging casually in the basement, some really big old pans.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

My family has used them for years. My grandmother finally quit using the big ones but that was because she had such severe arthritis. They were so heavy that she couldn't pick them up but she held on to them because they were used when others came out and cooked. I used them when I stayed with her after high school. She had a heart attack and the Dr. wouldn't let her go home unless someone was there with her. She had her heart attack in October and finally got allowed to go to her sister's until I graduated in January. Then I went out there. I was the only one who wasn't working. I took care of her for about 4 months. I got her cast iron and a set of dishes and her old circular chopper. I still use it when I want coleslaw. I had a hard time finding a shallow wooden bowl of the right size to use but someone gave me one a couple of years ago. My son likes to use it for a pizza cutter.


Rosemay50 profile image

Rosemay50 4 years ago from Hawkes Bay - NewZealand

Those trivets are really attractive Becky. My grandma used to have a couple of teapot stands.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Rosemay, I would give my eyeteeth for one of those teapot stands. I usually hang the trivets on my wall but the kitchen doesn't have much wall, too small. I did hang several up above the cupboards, doors and in the few spots I have to put them. I still have several that just won't fit. I have some old copper jello molds also but those won't fit. They brighten the kitchen and give it a little useful pizazz. I usually get compliments on how bright and cheery it looks. I made the mistake once of packing them all in one box and my son made me put them in little boxes when we moved. He said they would give him a hernia. He is one of the ones who doesn't have a problem moving my mahogany china cabinet. Made him groan. Hahaha


Hyphenbird profile image

Hyphenbird 4 years ago from America-Broken But Still Beautiful

Becky, this is a lovely Hub. Anything old or about family heirlooms makes me feel good. So many people do not appreciate quality anymore and old cast iron is the best. I do have some stainless steel pots but use my cast iron skillets for everything else. Cornbread has a great crust when baked in cast iron. Thanks for the fire tip. Your trivets are so pretty. I just love them.


Sunnie Day 4 years ago

Hi Becky,

We use and old cast iron skillet. It is our one of choice. I know it is over 30 years old. The best cornbread in the world is made on this skillet. Thank you for a wonderful hub.

Hugs,

Sunnie


mckbirdbks profile image

mckbirdbks 4 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

Hello Becky. I don't know anyone here at the hub who could have done better with a hub on this subject. Your information is told in a matter of fact method, and you can tell that you are speaking from experience. Your trivet collection is very nice and useful.

I remembered to do the appropriate voting.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

I season my cast iron on my gas operated BBQ. That way, I don't smoke up the house.

Good Hub, Becky.


always exploring profile image

always exploring 4 years ago from Southern Illinois

Interesting Becky..I have one iron skillet that belonged to my Mother. I use it when i make cornbread. I wouldn't take anything for it. It does rust, so i will certainly use your method of oiling. Thank you..Very informative Hub...


50 Caliber profile image

50 Caliber 4 years ago from Arizona

Hi Becky, for every but there's a chair somewhere and I have a cast iron seat from a steam farm tractor. Still have not found reference to brand, I just know I could not sit on it dawn until dusk. As for cook ware I have much and just gained another load from my Aunts estate. She teased me with 2 Eerie lids of the late 1800s to early 1900s origin. both are equipped with rows op drop tines, or titties and a number of other descriptive words they are a #10 and #13 and were both found at a sale Barn in Mo. some 40 years ago and I've not found any reference to them. If you lay them on their backs I suppose they appear an Uncle Festers bed of nails and their use I suppose is for moisture collection that drips back onto what ever is being cooked. I use them when cooking my taters that I slice exactly 3/8 inch thick and single layered with me seasoning applied and low and slow that produces my crisp carrot like snap to the skillet fried and self basted. I have had them one or the other off and on for 40 years in a game of back and forth between the finder, my aunt and the money guy, me on a trip to the sale barn. Her favorite was a cornbread that stayed moist with the use and mine is the taters. I hear they have no significant difference from those who don't have them, yet I'd argue that point, the tines are 1 1/4 inch in length and perch on an Eerie style skillet that has less side taper and a bout an extra 1 inch depth as well as Eerie Dutch ovens and they fit the two sizes perfectly, it took some looking and test fitting at flee markets and sale barns to find the matching skillets and ovens for both. I've no idea of the intended use of the design but my aunt and I both had recipes for them that just worked better with their use vs a flat lid. A knock down delicious "plumb dumpling" in the larger dutch oven with the drip lid to just done perfectly skillet cooked "snap taters".

I've seen one imitation lid with short nubs by "lodge" but that is he only other I have seen but I rally haven't looked that hard for them but I have looked for written use and description. I ask to see if you've a tale of them ? I used the smaller set last evening for taters, because my aunt was in possession of it and we were due to trade come fall, but instead I now have temporary use of both sets and I got my aunts cooking recipe card box of things she would cook but not tell giving me a chance to try to match her quality on my stove at home, the good lord willing I get back there.

Great article voted U,U,A,I. We have slightly different methods but I'm sure that yours works as ell as mine I use the campfire method to strip one that has been in water and find a layer of rust between the seasoning and skillet most often and like Will I begin the re-seasoning on a gas grill for the smokey process and I use lard heated to liquid and stainless steel wool to clean them if the cooking leaves a residue that won't wipe out clean by heating and rubbing with a dry but oiled dishcloth. I keep one on the stove with a half inch or so of bacon grease for basting my 6 eggs and half pound of bacon for breakfast, another reason I need to get gone, back home, the price of groceries here is insulting and I'm almost out of jerky. I may have to come up to your house and stay LOL, Peace,

Dusty


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

Dusty,

Here's a good source on Erie stuff:

http://www.wag-society.org/guest/ERIESkilletArticl...


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Hyphen, I knew you would use these. You just have that feel to you. I know we have to have our stainless because you just can't cook pasta in cast iron. I never heard of sticking a frying pan of cornbread in the oven until I moved to the south but you are right, it is the best. I have a pan for cornbread with the corn shape rows that is irreplaceable now. The fire tip is apparently not just my family, Dennis knew about it also. Yes, the trivets are beautiful and I wish Katy would have let me use her camera because they were just out of her reach above the door to the pantry and she couldn't get the best picture. See if I spend all that money buying her another camera.lol


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Sunnie, Everyone has at least one cast iron skillet. They are the best. I gave my big one to Rodger because it was so heavy that I could not lift it anymore, and he had the size family for it. It was an 18 inch one. I am glad you enjoyed and thanks for visiting.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Thank you Mike for the wonderful compliment. I guess my report writing in college is coming to the front when I write. Haha. I love the trivets and look for more when I go to flea markets and yard sales. Those were just a few of them but they are my favorites.I appreciate you coming by to visit and the votes.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Will, That is a wonderful idea. I never thought of it and I guess I am going to fire up the grill tomorrow as the trivets need a coat of shine and oil. I also have a one I got not long ago that I noticed has a little rust on it. Need to get it greased up good so it doesn't rust. Thank you for the kudos and for coming by to visit.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Ruby, so nice to hear you have a treasured heirloom skillet from your mother. The old ones are the best. Another cornbread maker. So funny as I never heard of it until I moved to the south. Very few people here suffer from low iron, I understand. My family looked at me like I was nuts when I went back to NV and stuck the mixture in my dad's big skillet. They loved it though. I believe my sister is still doing it that way though. I am glad I could help you with your rusting issue. It really does help. I really am glad that you came by to visit.


50 Caliber profile image

50 Caliber 4 years ago from Arizona

Thanks for the link Will! good stuff there, I ben spelling Erie like the lake eerie? or getting spooked in a monster movie?

Anyway, Becky, you ever seen the spiked lids? The link Will gave me put the lids a a whole in 1920 on.

Becky great info on the trivets as I thought they were farmer built as the only ones I saw were like the first in your picture, I just glanced and thought "sprockets" and passed them by and my dad made ours from wood in different shapes like pigs and other designs off an old table jig saw.

Dusty


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Dusty, if it just says Erie, it is pre-1873. In 1873, they changed the name to 'Seldon & Griswold'. I have not seen one with 'nipples' the size you say. A quick search did not show me anything. My dad had one with the shallow nipples and the self baster with rings. I have one with indentations. There are a couple of very good identification books out there but they are not on line. Maybe your library would have one. I will keep checking and see if I can find something and I have a friend that is in FL for the winter that I will ask when he gets back up here.

I could have bet that you would have a bunch of cast iron. My sister got my great aunts recipe box and wouldn't even let me borrow it to copy them. It would have just taken me a month to type them all out and save them on the computer. But she is that way.

If you want to stop up here and visit, you are so totally welcome, give me a day warning so I can send you directions and a phone number. That way you would be able to find us. I can't come and meet you because our van is still in the shop. The mechanic is supposed to come over this evening and let us know what he has found so far. Bad, I know. Our son had it so messed up that it still won't even start and he keeps finding all these little things that are wrong.

It was great finding this letter from you this afternoon. Haha! I am so glad you came by for a visit.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Thanks Will, Good information is always welcome.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

I was answering your questions and trying to find them while you were typing this. I have not seen any but will look some more. A lot of research in identifying antiques. Might take a while, I am not an expert in cast iron.

The trivets are not folk art, they were a big industry. There are probably some out there that are, because farmers rarely bought something if they could make it.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

BTW, Dusty, you are right...the spikes are self-basters.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Did you find them Will? I figured they were too but haven't found anything yet.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 4 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Wonderful, I will quit looking then. I am trying to get the house cleaned, which isn't easy because my husband is always here and the vacuum noise bothers him. I can continue cleaning while he is gone today.


50 Caliber profile image

50 Caliber 4 years ago from Arizona

Good find Will! Becky it's not that important, do what you need to. they could be worth 5 grand a piece and I'll just keep using them, I'm sure I don't have 200 bucks in them, but I'll need them a while longer,

I'm going to sleep. talk more tommorrow,

dust


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Do you want a price on them Dusty? I was just trying to identify them. After they are identified, we can worry about pricing them although they will be rather high. That amount each would be my guess.


tirelesstraveler profile image

tirelesstraveler 4 years ago from California

Love caste iron. Good reminder to re-season the one my husband just has to scour.


50 Caliber profile image

50 Caliber 4 years ago from Arizona

Becky, don't go all out as I won't sell them, I'm in a 25 pc. collection for prices that would make a collector cry and I have a use for all as well I just got 16 more pieces, finally the square for Monte Christo Sandwiches, on the menu at home I hope a week from today,

dust


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

tirelesstraveler, It won't hurt it as long as you grease it often. It might rust though. Hide it from him if he won't leave it alone. lol


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Dusty, You have a collection that would make a collector cry already. You might want to go through ebay sometime to get an idea of how much yours is worth. I really can't figure out much without good pictures anyway. Label marks and all. I would love to help you price it just so you would have an idea. There are some really good books out there but the only way to find out for sure is to have them researched.

Take care on your drive back. If you get up this way, stop by and I will fix a big pot of homemade chili or something like that. Lots of hot sauce on the table for you to get it as hot as you like and a jar of jalapena's to add in. I can't use much because they kill my husband's ulcer and my daughter doesn't like it too hot. What can I say, they're wimps. lol


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 4 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

Becky, what a coincidence. I was at IKEA today, and was wondering whether I would buy a cast iron pot. It just came into my head, and left almost as quickly. I am no cook, and it would most probably be wasted on me, but there you go. i bought a non-stick frying pan instead because the person who does most of the cooking for me has somewhat wrecked the last one.

If you can find it, there was a movie made some years ago: 'Liebestraum' which deals with a building which is of beautiful cast-iron construction, so main character wants to study it before the demolition. There's a bit of intrigue and a very old murder and over the next four days, their attraction grows one character explores the old building, attends his mother's (a very old Kim Novak) bedside, and unravels the past. I loved it. Very evocative movie.

I loved your hub... I'm amazed at how intriguing it was to read, Well written.

I'm sending you a picture of a piece of cast iron which I am sure you will find very beautiful.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Ian, dear friend and beloved old coot. You should have bought the cast iron. It is almost unruinable. My stepson ruined many of my non-stick pans before he learned to cook. He thought that everything should be cooked on high so he could eat faster.

I will see if I can find it but I do not watch many movies but I will for you.

I am so happy that you liked this. Katy was wondering if you had seen her latest hub? She is rather proud of it, with rights. I really appreciate you coming by to read this. Love ya, my old coot.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 4 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

Becky, tell Katy that I will go and search for it right now.

If you don't watch a lot of movies, perhaps miss this one, but I loved it.... it was unlike any movie I have ever seen. Quite haunting in a strangely disturbing way.

x


LuxmiH profile image

LuxmiH 4 years ago from Fort Pierce, Florida

Thanks for this informative Hub. I have always loved the idea of cooking with Cast Iron, but disliked the fact that it so often rusted. Now I know why! I needed this Hub, because quite obviously, I was totally clueless! This Hub gives me powerful information on how to season it. An important missing link, I'd say.

Voted up and useful.


marcoujor profile image

marcoujor 4 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

Becky,

As an Instructor, I must commend you in your approach to this subject. This is thorough, meaningful and most interesting. The pictures of your trivets are absolutely beautiful. Outstanding piece!

Voted UP & UABI-- textbook material. Hugs, mar.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Ian, I will tell her you read it. She is walking the dog right now.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Luxmi, yes, the curing, keeping it oiled, and not scrubbing the grease out of the pores of it are the key to keeping it from rusting. It is like your car motor. Keep it greased at all times.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

mar, so glad you found it useful and interesting. It is not easy to make educational materials interesting as you know. I am glad you liked the trivets. They add so much warmth to the kitchen. You would not think that iron could do that but it has such a mellow glow and they are quite interesting to look at. Some of them are very detailed. I really appreciate you coming by to visit.


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 4 years ago from Wales

This one Is so useful for me as I have a cast iron griddle (plank) on which I bake Welsh Cakes.

So a vote up up and away plus bookmark here.

Take care

Eddy.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Eddy, I am so glad that you will get some use in this. It is not hard or labor intensive to take care of cast iron. It just takes remembering to do it. It will also outlast us and cooks so evenly that it is worth the little extra effort to have it. It is such a joy to cook on. Thank you for the votes and the visit.


vespawoolf profile image

vespawoolf 4 years ago from Peru, South America

I love my cast iron skillet and use it for everything from scrambled eggs to searing steaks. I wash my cast iron with water then put it on the burner for a few minutes before oiling and putting away. As long as I don't use soap the seasoning stays put, making it a safe non-stick cookware option. Thank you for this informative and interesting hub!


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

vespawoolf, Most of us have our own little tricks for taking care of our cast iron. Thank you for sharing yours. I am glad that you found this useful. I appreciate you coming by to visit.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 4 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

Becky, my friend,I can almost see you with your arms folded across your chest as you say, "Most of us have our own little tricks for taking care of our cast iron. Thank you for sharing yours. I am glad that you found this useful".

(And then saying to yourself, "But I know what I know, and I'll continue to do things MY way", with a beaming - but obviously false smile on your face).


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Oh now, what makes you think I am that way? I would not do that. I just prefer to use a mild soapy solution to kill germs. Some people, it does not matter to. I am perfectly sweet, and I will continue to do it my way.


DrJez profile image

DrJez 4 years ago from Narara NSW Australia

Interesting Hub Becky. I enjoyed the read!


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Dr. Jez, so nice to see you here. I am so happy that you came by and found this interesting. Thank you for coming by to visit.


thumbi7 profile image

thumbi7 4 years ago from India

Thank you for educating me on how to take care of cast iron utensils.

I love the lay out of the hub and the pictures!


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

thumbi7, Do you use cast iron in India? I do not know what type of cookware you use there and am truly interested. It is fascinating the variety of cooking utensils and cookware used in different parts of the world. I am glad you liked this and really appreciate the kudos. Thank you for coming by to visit. Now I am going to have to research India some. You got my curiosity going.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 4 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

thumbi7 most probably uses a tawa in the kitchen when she is making paratha.

I use one all the time.


snakeslane profile image

snakeslane 4 years ago from Canada

Hello Mr Lawns, I have to ask, what exactly is a tawa? And while you're at it, could you describe paratha (recipe preferred) and whatever else you could add would be helpful (or you could write a Hub?) Cheers!


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Ok, My dear old coot, what is it made out of and what shape is it? I know about woks, it is like them? So glad you came to visit.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

snakeslane, such an interrogation. How are you?


snakeslane profile image

snakeslane 4 years ago from Canada

Hi Becky, it's the reporter in me lol. Not bad, how are you?


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Getting tired of the thunder with my dog holding my feet down shivering. He does not like it at all. Got back from the grocery just 10 minutes before the rain hit.


snakeslane profile image

snakeslane 4 years ago from Canada

Awww, poor puppy! Good you got the groceries in before the storm hit.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Just needed a few things, probably could have done without them. Dennis wanted some soda and some peanut butter/cheese crackers. He needs to have snacks often to keep his diabetes balanced. He eats about 6 times a day, small meals. He is not supposed to get really hungry, that is when the blood sugar really drops and if he eats too much at once, it goes sky high.


snakeslane profile image

snakeslane 4 years ago from Canada

Hey Becky, first time I've heard of these particular crackers, what will they think of next. Small frequent meals seems to be the mode for diabetic diet. Hope Dennis is enjoying his comfort food.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

You don't have them there? They are cheese flavored crackers with peanut butter between them, packed in packs of 6.


snakeslane profile image

snakeslane 4 years ago from Canada

Maybe we do lol, I will have a look.


lifelovemystery profile image

lifelovemystery 4 years ago from Houston, TX

These are great tips! My husband introduced me to cast iron and I rarely use anything else on my stove.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

lifelovemystery, how did you go long enough to get married and not know cast iron? Your mom must have been one of those that was going for the non-stick. I am glad that you have learned about the joys of its even heat distribution and non-stick qualities. It is so nice to cook on, I know you love it. Thanks for coming by to visit.


ThomasBaker profile image

ThomasBaker 4 years ago from Florida

I tried to cure an iron pan quickly and used the microwave. It didn't seem to work out. As a matter of fact, I had to buy a new microwave. The second time I tried I took my neighbor's advice and put it on the exhaust manifold of my car engine. I had a hard time getting it to stay on when rounding corners. Next time I will follow your directions.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Thomas, I hope you are kidding about trying to cure cast iron either way. In the gas barbeque or in the oven are the only ways to go. If you use the barbeque, you get to miss the smoke in the house.


ThomasBaker profile image

ThomasBaker 4 years ago from Florida

I was just kidding...you know, trying to add some excitement to the subject at hand. What I really did was to listen on my CB radio to hear Fiire Department chatter. There was an old shed burning down by Walgreens. I rushed down to the fire and threw my old pan into the thick of it....came out real good.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Thomas, your sense of humor is really sick at times. I really enjoy it.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 4 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

Great sense of humour, Thomas. I'm going to have a look at you hubs. You'd better fulfil your promise.

Ha ha!


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Oh, you will not be disappointed Ian. His hubs are just like his notes. Try his stories. They will have you in stitches.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 4 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

yes, but the comment section has been disabled, Becky.

And like to provide (and to receive) feedback


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

I let him know, I don't think it was on purpose.


Docmo profile image

Docmo 4 years ago from UK

Great hub Becky, Have been wondering how to cure some cast iron woks and pots - thanks for the timely info... voted up!


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Docmo, Glad I could help. If you need some help, just let me know. The stuff is nearly indestructible. This takes care of all cast iron. I use this method to keep my trivets from rusting also. There are also cooking utensils. Thanks for coming by to visit.


bethperry profile image

bethperry 4 years ago from Tennesee

Becky, helpful Hub. My husband does most of our cooking and thankfully knows how to cure the cast iron and as well cook on it and clean it. He doesn't trust me to touch it, which I find a wonderful relief, lol!


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Beth, I wish my husband knew how. He is the reason I have had to use the burn method to clean my dutch oven a few times. He burnt a ham in it and the crust was an inch thick. I tried to scrub it and ended up just burning it clean. I won't let him cook any more. Thanks for coming by to visit.


bethperry profile image

bethperry 4 years ago from Tennesee

Becky, I feel your pain! There are few things harder to clean than a darned dutch oven with scorched on food.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

With cast iron it is easy though. Build a little bonfire and stick it in there. It will burn out and then you can re-season. It will be a little bit until it is non stick but it will not be in the garbage.


b. Malin profile image

b. Malin 4 years ago

Hi Becky, Wow, look at all the Wonderful Comments, you really "stirred" it up with this Hub on care for Cast Iron items. This was such an Educational read, everything anyone would need to know... and somethings that I didn't know! A very Interesting fact about not using Cast Iron to boil water...it can Rust...who knew. I gotta give you an UP and Useful and Interesting Vote Girlfriend, Thank You for sharing!


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Hey b. malin, how are you doing? Glad I could educate you a little. It isn't easy finding things that people do not know about cast iron. Thanks for the votes, punny humor, and for coming by to visit.


J.S.Matthew profile image

J.S.Matthew 4 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

I love how you included the historical use of cast iron in this Hub and I also learned from your scientific explanation of how the metal and elements are formed and bonded. I find this is very interesting! Very well researched-you know quite a bit cast iron!

I enjoy cooking with my cast iron. I just use a soft brush and hot water to clean but I can understand your concern for cross-contamination. One of the restaurants I worked in actually cleaned them in the industrial dishwasher! They never got rusty because they were frequently used in the broiler and they were very well seasoned. I guess if your pan is seasoned enough that mild soap wouldn't hurt it then it is ok.

Great information here! Voted up and sharing.

JSMatthew~


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

J.S. Matthew, I like to do some research on my hubs and this was so interesting. I love history and this just looked like something that would go well in here. I have had my dad's and grandparents examples to learn from and they knew quite a bit about cast iron. That is all they had when my dad was young. Cooking with acidy food is all right as long as you clean it immediately after using it also. We used to make spaghetti in it and it never damaged it but we cleaned it right away. I would never clean it in a dishwasher but it would need to be oiled frequently if you did. I use a mild soap, never one that is supposed to cut grease when I wash it and then dry it on a burner and lightly oil it. It never gets a chance to rust. The oil soaks right in as it cools. I really appreciate you coming by to visit.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 4 years ago from Dallas, Texas

Hi Becky, This is great information, educational and useful. I wish I had known about the fire pit method of cleaning when I found my cast iron frying pan a dozen years ago. It has taken that long and a lot of elbow grease to scour off the blackened char that covered the exterior of this very old Wagner ware skillet. I love cooking in this pan. When I used the non-stick cookware in a recipe last week it just didn't give the dish the flavor I was used to.

Your tips on seasoning a cast-iron pan are thorough, detailed and easy to follow. Thanks for sharing the knowledge!


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Hi Peg, I am so glad that you found something to help you with your cast iron. I was raised by people who used cast iron constantly. They knew all the tricks. I needed to share with those whose parents did not use it. I needed to save the info from becoming lost.

I can't use it unless I have someone else cooking because I have damaged nerves and can't pick the heavy stuff up. My daughter has never used it. I am going to gift her some when she moves out, with instructions to use it.

Thank you for coming by to visit.


Tonipet profile image

Tonipet 4 years ago from The City of Generals

Hello Becky. The cast iron Dutch oven I have been using has also been handed down to me from my grandmother and seasoning has helped it last until today. Most of our other cast iron pots are used in the dirty kitchen and amazing these were the same pots my great grand folks used. You just brought me back to times of long ago, my favorite! Voted up awesome and interesting, thank you!


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Tonipet, I am so glad I could bring back memories of the old days. Those are the best kind. Using your ancestors cast iro is so awesome and I know you cherish it. I am so glad you came by to visit.


Darcy 4 years ago

This is one of the very rare How To's that is spot on and very detailed.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Darcy, Thank you for the compliment. I try to be accurate when I write about a subject. I do additional research even if I know the it well. Thank you for coming by to visit.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Ghost, at your age, not to know how to take care of cast iron is silly. Your mother's was probably well cured from using it. And as long as it was not allowed to sit with food in it, and was used daily, it would mostly stay cured. I am sure that your mother knew how to take care of it and probably didn't see a reason to teach you how to take care of it. Scrubbing with the older soaps was not as bad for it also. The newer ones have more grease cutting ingredients in them. If you bought a new one and started using it, that is when you would need these steps. Also if you got your old ones out. They probably would need a good scrubbing, greasing and curing. Sitting in a box, no matter how dry, they always get rusty. Thanks for coming to visit.


Mama Kim 8 profile image

Mama Kim 8 4 years ago

I love my cast iron pan, especially for items that go from stove top to oven... very convenient ^_^ Great hub and especially liked your explanation on cleaning ^_^ voted a bunch!


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 4 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Mama Kim, cast iron is great stuff. I have an old enameled cast iron casserole that was my great aunts. It is white on the inside and yellow on the outside and is so easy to take care of. It looks great hanging on the wall or sitting on the table. I have also used it on top of the stove. I would not get rid of it for the world. I love all of mine and use it as much as I can. I am happy that the explanations helped. People have different takes on whether to wash with soap or not and I leave it up to them to decide which they prefer. I do know how to get a badly filthy one clean though and it is not by chipping cooked on food out. That just damages the finish, making it less non-stick. I also love my dutch ovens. Cook stove, oven, or campfire, it doesn't care. Thanks for coming by to visit.


tmbridgeland profile image

tmbridgeland 3 years ago from Small Town, Illinois

use a big Griswold cast iron pan just like in your top picture. It's great. Only problem I have is keeping the kids from over-cleaning it.

My mom would occasionally clean her's in the oven. Just put the oven on the self-cleaning setting and run the cleaning cycle. It burns off any char or burnt on food. You do have to re-season it after.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 3 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

tmbridgeland, I had a big 30 inch one and gave it to my son. I couldn't lift it any more and with my family shrinking as they aged, he had a bigger need for it. Cast iron is the greatest and it is fairly easy to take care of. Over cleaning is as big a crime as not cleaning it in my book. That is like putting the wooden handled knives in the dishwasher. Thanks for coming by to visit.


tmbridgeland profile image

tmbridgeland 3 years ago from Small Town, Illinois

I really like my big cast iron skillet. I wrote a Hub a while back about making cornbread pancakes, featured that pan in the pics. Bought it at Farm & Fleet when we first moved here as a gift for my wife. She had never used one before, didn't like it at first because it was so heavy. Now it is the only one we use, and our expensive stainless sit in the cupboard.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 3 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

I was raised using it but damaged my tendons. Dr. told me not to use the bigger ones and the repair should hold a little longer.


Frank Atanacio profile image

Frank Atanacio 3 years ago from Shelton

Becky what a useful and very clever hub yeah it was worth the stop ove :)


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 3 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Frank, Thank you for the useful and clever. I couldn't believe how many don't know how to use cast iron. I guess a whole generation has missed out on this great stuff. My parents had a lot of it and used it often. I figured someone would like to learn more about it. Thank you for coming to visit.


Alise- Evon 3 years ago

You are right, this answered all my questions about caring for cast iron. Excellent hub. Voted up, useful, and shared.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 3 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Alise-Evon, I had some people asking me how to take care of cast iron, they had never had any. Those questions spawned this hub. Many have never used it and their parents didn't use it. That left them not knowing all the things that I learned from my parents and grandparents. I am so happy that this helped you with your questions. Thank you for coming to visit.


bravewarrior profile image

bravewarrior 3 years ago from Central Florida

This is very informative, Becky. Most of my cast iron skillets need to be re-seasoned. I will print this and keep it on hand. When I clean mine, I use nothing but hot water - no soap at all. My mother uses course salt and a paper towel to clean hers if food does happen to stick.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 3 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

bravewarrior, I have used this stuff for my whole life and still did research to find out how others clean it. I wanted to make it complete and offer people all the options I could. I still missed a few and learned about them in the comments. I am going to have to add them in. I appreciate the visit.


wabash annie profile image

wabash annie 3 years ago from Colorado Front Range

Enjoyed the information. I have several cast ir0n skillets, a dutch oven, and a pot with legs. All are old. Great hub!


Docmo profile image

Docmo 3 years ago from UK

I have been looking of some handy tips to cure our cast iron wok and pan. This is truly useful Becky. I like cooking in cast iron as the way it disperses heat uniformly makes for good cooking times and quality. Thanks very much for this.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 3 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

wabash annie, Glad you enjoyed the information. I have been using cast iron since I was a child. My parents and grandparents used them and showed me how to take care of them. We have some really old ones. My grandfather used his grandparents cast iron. Thank you for coming to visit.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 3 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Docmo, glad I could help you with your cast iron cookware. It truly is wonderful at producing an even, all over heat. It is also wonderful because once you get it cured properly, it is virtually non-stick. I appreciate the comments and visit.


prettynutjob30 profile image

prettynutjob30 3 years ago from From the land of Chocolate Chips,and all other things sweet.

Great hub, voted up and shared, I love cast iron skillets but hate cleaning them. I have rusted so many of them, my hubby told me to let him clean them because I kept ruining them.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 3 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

I love my cast iron skillet. It doesn't seem to ever pose a problem.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 3 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

prettynutjob, all you have to do to dry them and keep them from rusting, is to not scrub too hard with detergent and make sure they get dried well. Grease cutting dish soap is a no-no. Use a mild soap, if any. Dry them on the burner to make sure all of the water is out of it. Then lightly grease them. They will never rust if you clean them that way. Thank you for the visit and comment.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 3 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

rebeccamealey, Cast iron is very forgiving. It is extremely hard to mess it up and almost impossible to ruin it. The only thing that cannot be repaired is if you do not wash it and it will pit or if you scrape gouges in it. In both cases food will stick in the scrapes and pits. They can be sanded down, if you wish to spend that much time on them but it takes a good while to do that. Thank you for coming by to visit.


Shelley 3 years ago

We are currently digging sandstone blocks out of an old foundation and in doing so, we found an old trivet. We brought it home thinking it would be nice to clean up and keep. It looks like the photo you have above of the trivet shaped like a teapot, except filthy and covered with rust. Who knows how many years it has been in that foundation. Do you have any tips or recommendations on how we can get it looking its best? Thanks!


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 3 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Shelley, I would scrub it with a stiff brush to get most of it off and then stick it on the edge of a bonfire and burn the dirt and rust off of it. Then let it cool in the fire pit, until next day. Tap it gently with a hammer to knock the burnt dirt and rust off of it. Not too hard or you could break it, cast iron is brittle. If the dirt and rust doesn't come off of it, you can use fine steel wool on it and that should take it off. Make sure it is fine steel wool as it will scratch it. That doesn't matter with a trivet as much as with cookware though. Then use some shortening to grease it and either put it in a gas barbecue for about 20 minutes or on foil in your oven at 350 degrees for the same length of time. That should have it back to normal.


hlwar 3 years ago

So very informative, and many thanks for the useful tips! I sort of inherited cast iron skillets from my mother and they're my favorite pans to cook with. But I never knew just exactly how to take care of them.

This definitely helps! d(^_^)


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 3 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

hlwar, I also inherited a bunch of cast iron, but I had learned how to take care of it while I was growing up. We took it camping and used it on the campfires to help keep it clean. That burned the extra grease off of it. It needs the grease to keep it non-stick but when it gets too much, it takes fire to burn it off. I am glad you can find some of this useful.


MYWIKISTEP 3 years ago

This is very useful. I think we all have inherited some cast iron objects. Nice!


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 3 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

MYWIKISTEP, I love my inherited cast iron and I have started collecting the trivets. They are so decorative and useful hanging on the kitchen wall. I just grab one when needed. They need care the same as the cookware. I am happy you found this useful and thank you for coming by to visit.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 3 years ago from Taos, NM

Becky, what a fascinating article. I have some cast iron cookware and it is a hand washed item at my house. I didn't know how to season cast iron and to tell you the truth I never have. So reading this is really helpful to me. This is a wonderful article. Thanks for sharing you knowledge with us.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 3 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

suzette, If you buy it pre-seasoned, you may never need to season it. Some of the older ones need to be seasoned a little more often. It should all be hand washed although many restaurants have to run theirs through the dishwasher to sanitize them. They use a lot more grease than I do though. Glad you found something helpful in here. Thank you for coming by to visit.


dahoglund profile image

dahoglund 2 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids

Hi Becky. This is very informative about cast iron. As I recall, my mother used some of it. I had a friend when I was working that worked with iron-his hobby and hopeful retirement was blacksmithing. Unfortuately he did not live to do that. The stuff he did do seemed to be in much demand. I'll try to remember the information you supplied here as the subject might come up in a story. rated up and shared.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada.

Hi Becky. I am so glad I saw this hub, thanks to dahoglund. This is a great, informational and very useful hub. My cast iron skillet belonged to my Dad and is almost 100 years old -- it is still like new and my favorite cooking utensil. Thanks for sharing your advice and writing this hub. I was very happy to see that all your advice is the way I take care of my skillet, as my Dad taught me.

Voted Up, UAI, and shared.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 2 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Hi Don, good to see you out and about. Hope you are feeling better. My parents and grandparents all used cast iron. I have a friend that makes decorative cast iron objects. He sells them for a lot of money too. I am saving up for it. Thanks for coming by to visit.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 2 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Hi Phyllis, Good to see you here. I love cast iron and use it as decorations, since my carpel tunnel makes it painful to use it. I have a bunch hanging on the walls of my kitchen. My dad and grandfather taught me how to take care of it. I find pieces at flea markets and yard sales, clean it,season it and sell it for a bit more. People are always happy to get an old piece that is in usable condition. I have gotten some that was rusty and filthy, and made it good and usable. Thank you for coming by to visit.


Marie Flint profile image

Marie Flint 2 years ago from Jacksonville, FL

My daughter just purchased a cast-iron skillet recently. I love the way it lightly sears the tofu squares. I lightly oil the pan after washing and drying. I reminded my daughter that the additional iron that goes into the food from cooking with this skillet will be helpful during the fourth month of gestation when the fetus starts absorbing a lot of iron. (I think that was one of the reasons for buy the pan.)


prasetio30 profile image

prasetio30 2 years ago from malang-indonesia

Very informative hub and I love your tips. Thanks for sharing with us. Vote up and keep up good work!

Prasetio


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 2 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

Marie Flint, one of the benefits of cast iron is how it infuses your food with a bit more iron. Congratulations on the upcoming baby. They are always a joy. So nice of you to come visit.


Becky Katz profile image

Becky Katz 2 years ago from Hereford, AZ Author

prasetio, It is always a pleasure to see you and your wonderful comments. I truly appreciate the visit from you.

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