How to make, Italian style Barramundi, with pine nuts, and Barramundi in a Lemonade batter.

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4.5 stars from 2 ratings of barramundi


Hello, and welcome to this my latest hub.

Each month I get a delivery of fish from the famous Yorkshire fishing town called Grimsby. It is usually a mixed box of fish caught in the North Sea and sometimes frozen from around the world. It means that I always have plenty of fish in my freezers, fish as diverse as red snapper, octopus, squid, monkfish, and this time barramundi, I knew very little about. So I have two interesting recipes for you, and if you are not lucky enough to be able to source some barramundi then you can use bass or perhaps even salmon. For my friends in the States, they are being farmed in Turner Falls Massachusetts.

Source


Barramundi, is a very useful fish, and there are a whole load of reasons for using it; not least the fact that it is one of the healthiest fishes available in the market.

Firstly, it has a fantastic texture; it is a meaty fish very similar to salmon or bass.

Secondly barramundi is high in omega-3 and omega-6 which are important structural components of cell membranes. Omega-3 is required for the development and function of the brain and resting, it also plays an important part in brain function. Over the past few years it has been discovered that these fatty acids are vital for good health.

Barramundi live in the waters of Northern Australia and in the seas around India and Sri Lanka. It is also known as Asian bass, its scientific name is barramundi perch.

It can grow to 4 feet in length and weighing almost 90 pound, virtually all the fish are born masculine and after they have bred they change to feminine, which means that females can only breed with younger males in their prime. A large female will lay 32 million eggs in a season, and curiously they only spawn when it is a full moon.

Another health factor is that it is half the calories of salmon.


My Italian friend Fabio was here when I thawed out one of the fillets of barramundi, neither of us had cooked it before so we just used our cooking experience and instincts to guide us as to what would give us a really tasty meal.

Cook Time

Prep time: 30 min
Cook time: 35 min
Ready in: 1 hour 5 min
Yields: serves four or two hungry people
great texture, and wonderful flavour
great texture, and wonderful flavour | Source

Healthy lower in calories


Another health factor is that it is half the calories of salmon.

Ingredients

  • 500 gms barramundi, frozen is best
  • half a cup pine nuts
  • one onion
  • tablespoon Italian herbs, dried mix
  • one stalk celery
  • salt to taste
  • 1/2 a cup raisins
  • parsley, chopped rough
Click thumbnail to view full-size
prepare your ingredients
prepare your ingredients
prepare your ingredients | Source
Source
Source

This is how to cook your dish.


My Italian friend Fabio was here when I thawed out one of the fillets of barramundi, neither of us had cooked it before so we just used our cooking experience and instincts as to what would give us a really tasty meal.

Cook the fillet into suitable sized pieces and put aside.

Finely chop an onion, and two cloves of garlic.

Finely chop on stick of celery, and fresh fennel.

soak raisins in a mixture of sherry or wine and balsamic vinegar

chop up your pointy cabbage and wash the potatoes. I like a variety called 'Pink Fir' they are a bit of a strange shape, but they have a great flavour ideal hot or cold with salads as well as main courses.

Heat a tablespoon of ghee and a tablespoon of olive oil, and then gently cook with the onion, garlic and salary until they are soft. Add the raisings and stir together.

Now add the pine nuts and Italian herbs and mix everything together. Put these in a pan to keep warm ready for serving.

Place the pieces of barramundi in the pan flesh side down and cook on a very gentle heat for about five minutes until it begins to go white. Carefully turn the fish over onto its skin side and increase the heat you can cook on a heat strong enough to make the skin go crispy if you wish or again until it goes white; do not overcook or you will spoil its wonderful subtle flavours.

Meantime boil the potatoes in a little salted water, and with about 5 min to go add the cabbage. I hate cabbage that has been overcooked until it is completely soggy, I like it still nice and crunchy.

Drinks cabinet

On this occasion I had my favourite tipple, a delicate French red, Corbieres. Luckily I have a friend with a house in France and when she does the journey there and back in her car she brings me a good supply of this wonderful French red.

St. Emilion would also be very nice, because it has a slightly peppery dryness to it.

A new world chardonnay, crisp and tangy with a hint of citrus would also be a wine I might choose.

a fantastic tasty and healthy meal. Barramundi, Pink Fir potatoes and pointy cabbage.
a fantastic tasty and healthy meal. Barramundi, Pink Fir potatoes and pointy cabbage. | Source

Barrmundi in lemonade batter.

I was so enjoying this, I forgot to photograph it until I had nearly eaten it.
I was so enjoying this, I forgot to photograph it until I had nearly eaten it. | Source

Fish and chips


We so enjoyed the Barramundi that I was determined to experiment with it and try something a little different. We all love fish and chips at our house so I thought I would try making a nice crispy batter by using a very simple flour mixed with a little salt and a tumbler of lemonade. Beer batters are very common these days, but not everyone likes beer, and so to keep the sugar down instead of using the beer used diet low cal. Lemonade; for the I used sweet potatoes cut into scallops as we call them here in Yorkshire, in other words thin slices rather than chips.

For the batter you need,

One cup of plain (all purpose) flour.

A good pinch of salt

A tumbler of fizzy lemonade.

Add the salt to the flour, and then gently pour in the lemonade so as not to lose all the bubbles.

Dip your fish in plain flour both sides and then into the batter, the flour helps the batter to stick to the fish.

Heat your deep fryer, and when up to temperature gently add the fish.

A useful tip.

I usually dip the fish holding it by the thin end, and then drop it into the oil away from me. So that if it splashes it won’t splash me.

When crispy, golden brown serve with your chips, and season with malt vinegar and salt, and maybe tomato ketchup.

I enjoyed this so much I forgot to photograph it until it was nearly all gone, I'm sure I will be making it again and then I'll have to add more photos here.

This turned out to be a really crispy cruchy batter, yum yum it was great.

Adventure on the high seas

Guilty of Honour
Guilty of Honour

The first book of this fantastic trilogy

 

Source of reference the Australis web site, where you can find lots of interesting facts about this fish,

More by this Author


Comments 15 comments

kashmir56 profile image

kashmir56 4 years ago from Massachusetts

Hi my friend sounds like a very yummy recipe and so easy to do ! But the barramundi fish i have not see here where i live so i can not try this one .

Vote up and more !!! SHARING !


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Hi Kash,

try bass instead, it has a similar texture.

thanks for comment and votes. It was a real treat.

cheers

Tony


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Hi Kash

you can use seabass instead, but do try the lemonade batter, its great and crunchy with a slightly sweeter edge to it.

with respect

Tony


Derdriu 4 years ago

Tony, Hmm hmm crunchily cooked cabbage and pine nuts and soaked raisins! When will the scent capsules be up and running on HubPages?

What do you think of my linking my bass hubs to this recipe?

Respectfully, and with many thanks for sharing, Derdriu


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Derdriu

I'd be delighted and honoured to swap links with you. Barramundi is on the menu again tonight it is really nice, it is available in the States.

thanks for dropping by.

ttfn

Tony


Derdriu 4 years ago

Tony, Thank you!

Respectfully, Derdriu


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

derdriu

links added glad to oblige.

ttfn

Tony


Handicapped Chef profile image

Handicapped Chef 3 years ago from Radcliff Ky

Tony this is a really great hub I like the fish and chip recipe adding the lemonade is just awesome I will have to try that ...thanks for sharing .


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 3 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Hi Chef

glad you liked it, what better with fish than lemon, so lemonade is just as good and the fizz gives it a light bubbly feel.

thanks for returning the call, I look forward to seeing you again soon

regards

Tony


Handicapped Chef profile image

Handicapped Chef 3 years ago from Radcliff Ky

Tony It's a honor and I agree the lemonade gives it that pop and true nothing is better than lemon and fish so I really love this concept .


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 3 years ago from Yorkshire Author

chef

thank you for comment and following, I'll return the compliment.

regards

Tony


Derdriu 3 years ago

Tony, This is a revisit for me because your barramundi information is so enjoyably exact. In particular, I appreciate tips such as about processing the cabbage just so and about drinks such as "peppery" dry St. Emilion wine.

What exactly is contained within your dry mix of Italian herbs?

Shared.

Respectfully, and with many thanks for sharing and all the votes oh Proper Champion Yorkshireman and Owd Yorkshire Cousin (through John's and Tomasin's Joseph), Derdriu


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 3 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Derdriu

good to hear from you, thank you for your visit and kind comments.

Oregano-Basil-Sage-Thyme-Bay leaves- for anything Beefy add a little English mustard powder.

Shh don't tell anyone about the mustard powder which adds a little special kick to it, it was Fabio's idea.

Salutations to the Celtic Queen of hubs and flutterbies.

from yer owd Yorky pud

Tony


Mickji profile image

Mickji 2 years ago from between Italy and Switzerland, travelling around the world thanks to a little special object

Your Italian friend was very lucky to be able to try it because here in Italy I cannot find any, and I don't like the idea of using the salmon. I think I'll go for the common line and use a bass fish.


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 2 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Hi Mickji,

I hope your travels go well, plenty of hub writing once you have landed somewhere.

You could also try Basa which has a similar texture to Barramundi. Sadly we can't get any either at the moment.

cheers

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