Irish Soda Bread

The Irish developed soda bread for three very simple reasons. The first was that they had no yeast, therefore yeast breads were out. The second was that very few people had ovens – most cooking was done over an open heart, and bread was baked in a covered pot in the coals or directly on a bakestone. Finally – the wheat in Ireland was ‘soft’ – not ‘hard’ wheat which is what most yeast bread is made from. Soft wheat doesn’t have the gluten content necessary for making yeast bread.

Whatever the reasons, what we know today as Irish soda bread is a very slightly sweet loaf bread, with a texture reminiscent of a biscuit, and a flavor that is out of this world. I mean – it’s absolutely fabulous. I adapted this recipe from a couple I found online, working both Irish and American recipes into it. You can make it using just the all purpose flour if you wish, but I do like the extra flavor the whole wheat brings to the party.

I'll also admit that 'real' or 'traditional' Irish soda bread isn't nearly as sweet as this. Much of the time it had very little or no sugar - I've seen it with only flour, soda and buttermilk. But this style did become increasingly popular in the 19th and 20th centuries. And it's good. I also have an open hearth, but I have no intention of building a fire big enough to lay a bed of coals hot enough to bake bread. So there.

The one and only trick to this bread is not to over knead it. The more you mess with the dough the tougher the final product will be. The hallmark of this little lovely is the phenomenal texture. So once you add the buttermilk, knead it only just barely enough for the dough to come together.

I’ve also heard that the bread is better after it cools and sits. Apparently you’re supposed to wrap it up and have it later in the day after an early morning bake, or even the next day. I personally don’t think a loaf has ever been around that long. In my house it doesn’t even get to cool off before it’s gone.

This is what your mixture should look like when the butter has been mixed in.
This is what your mixture should look like when the butter has been mixed in.
Once the egg and buttermilk are added - the dough will begin to come together. If you're using a mixer, stop when it looks like this. Here is where you begin to knead.
Once the egg and buttermilk are added - the dough will begin to come together. If you're using a mixer, stop when it looks like this. Here is where you begin to knead.
After the dough has come together like in the previous picture, turn it out on a floured surface to knead. If you have little sniglets left over like this - ignore them. Leave them alone - they don't matter.
After the dough has come together like in the previous picture, turn it out on a floured surface to knead. If you have little sniglets left over like this - ignore them. Leave them alone - they don't matter.
You want to knead the dough only until it will form a ball like this. Pat the ball until it's sort of flat - a disc.
You want to knead the dough only until it will form a ball like this. Pat the ball until it's sort of flat - a disc.
Cut the crosses in the top pretty deep - let your knife go at least halfway down through the dough.
Cut the crosses in the top pretty deep - let your knife go at least halfway down through the dough.

·        3 cups all-purpose flour

·        1 cup whole wheat flour

·        5 tablespoons white sugar

·        1 teaspoon baking soda

·        1 tablespoon baking powder

·        1/2 teaspoon salt

·        1/2 cup butter, room temperature

·        1 cup buttermilk

·        1 egg

·        1/4 cup butter, room temperature

·        1/4 cup buttermilk, warmed slightly

  1. Preheat oven to 375 F. Lightly grease a large baking sheet. You’ll probably have the paper wrapper off a stick of butter – use that to put a thin layer of butter on the baking sheet. If not, just use a little bit of oil or butter on a paper towel.
  2. In a large bowl, or in the bowl of a mixer, whisk together the first five ingredients. Stir in 1 cup of the buttermilk and the egg. You may need to quickly pinch the butter into the dough with your fingers. It can be very rough.
  3. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead slightly. DO not over knead the dough.
  4. Form dough into a round and place on the baking sheet. In a small bowl or a measuring cup place the ¼ cup buttermilk and ¼ cup butter. Microwave just until the butter is melted and the buttermilk is warm.*
  5. Brush loaf with the buttermilk mixture. Use a sharp knife to cut an 'X' into the top of the loaf. Make sure the x is nice and deep - you want to go almost halfway through the loaf. That will allow the bread to rise as it should.
  6. Bake in preheated oven for 45 to 50 minutes. Every fifteen minutes or so, brush the top with more of the butter/buttermilk mixture, until it's done or you run out of buttermilk, whichever comes first.
  7. You can either run a toothpick or skewer into it - to see if it comes out clean, or you can tap it. It won't sound as 'thumpy' as traditional French or Italian loaves, but it will 'feel' hollow when done.

*The first time I made this I simply put the melted butter into the buttermilk, which is what the original recipe instructed. The cold buttermilk immediately solidified the butter and I had a gloppy mess. I used it anyway, which I shouldn’t have. The mixture wasn’t smooth going on top of the bread, and the crust didn’t brown evenly. In addition, it glued the x I cut into the loaf back together, so it wasn’t nearly as pretty as it should have been. Tasted great though. The kids and I ate it standing at the kitchen counter. Never even made it to the rack to cool.

In the oven - see how the 'x' starts to separate?
In the oven - see how the 'x' starts to separate?

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Comments 2 comments

dragonbear profile image

dragonbear 5 years ago from Essex UK

Another great soda bread recipe! Thanks for a great hub!


ajcor profile image

ajcor 5 years ago from NSW. Australia

I have been looking for this recipe for some time so this is very useful...as a child at boarding school we had this for breakfast every morning - along with porridge....no wonder we looked very well fed! cheers

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