How to Make Marrow and Ginger jam

Marrow and ginger jam. This will make a lovely warming jam for our winter breakfasts
Marrow and ginger jam. This will make a lovely warming jam for our winter breakfasts | Source

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Marrow and ginger jam recipe

Making marrow and ginger jam is a great way to use marrows. I've often been asked what to do with the autumn glut of over-grown courgettes (or Zucchini)? In other words, marrows. Well, why not make this wonderfully tasty and unusual jam?

Time to get out my Granny's cookery book full of fabulous, quaint old fashioned recipes for chutney and jam. Today at Les Trois Chenes, our farmhouse bed and breakfast in deepest rural France, I'm going to make marrow and ginger jam from the superb marrow my kind neighbours left on my doorstep yesterday.

Very large marrows, like this one, will have toughened skin and can be quite hard work, but you can use younger marrows. In this case they will break down rather than stay in little cubes like mine. This is an unusual jam and one of our favourite recipes; our B&B guests love it.


Jam making equipment

First, utensils for making jam. Remember, you don't need anything fancy, just a large saucepan, wooden spoon, old, but clean jars with tops.

I use a special jam funnel but you can use a heat-proof jug, or ladle or spoon and if you make a bit of a mess you just clean it up.

This is what I use:

  • Lovely French copper jam pan - it is also decorative when not in use
  • Wooden spoon with long handle
  • Ladle
  • Old jam jars. You can use any other sort of jar but beware lingering odours, or treat yourself to pretty new ones
  • Jam funnel or heatproof jug
  • Muslin, or old net curtain
  • Jam covers, if you like, but I don't bother with these
  • Labels, but I only use labels for jam I am going to give away. All my jam is nice so I just reach for the next pot - 'take pot luck'.

Jam making equipment: essential, helpful, efficient and just plain delightful
Jam making equipment: essential, helpful, efficient and just plain delightful | Source

Select a good, large marrow and firm lemons

How to make the marrow jam, marrow, lemons, sugar!
How to make the marrow jam, marrow, lemons, sugar!

Ingredients

  • 2kg Marrow
  • 2kg sugar
  • 4oz ginger
  • a little cayenne pepper
  • 3 lemons

A few jam-making tips

  • Use good quality fruit and vegetables, or cut away damaged parts
  • Wash any fruit and veg which may have been sprayed with insecticide but drain after
  • Store in a dry cupboard and keep away from light


Put marrow and sugar into a pan and leave overnight
Put marrow and sugar into a pan and leave overnight | Source

How to make the marrow jam

Marrows are better in the autumn when their skins are nice and hard. Peel the marrow, scrape out the seeds and soft inner flesh and chop the firm harder flesh into small pieces. My recipe said walnut sized pieces, but my husband, who has made this jam in the past, thinks smaller pieces are better. Take your choice. Peel the lemons and the ginger and put into the muslin, tied with string. (I admit, I use net curtaining 'cause I couldn't find my muslin - On Dear, but it works).

Photo bit fuzzy, possibly due to fizzy white wine - wine is for the cook and not the jam.

Next day, simmer gently for one and a half hours

Next day, simmer gently for one and a half hours
Next day, simmer gently for one and a half hours

Put marrow and sugar into a pan and leave overnight

Put the sugar and marrow into a large pan or jam pan with the chopped ginger and lemon peel tied up in the musin bag. Add the juice of the lemons.

Don't add any water or cover the pan. The jam is ready when the marrow is translucent and looks like crystalized ginger.

Next day, simmer gently for one and a half hours

Prepare the jam funnel, ladles, jars, lids and equipment
Prepare the jam funnel, ladles, jars, lids and equipment

Prepare the jars, lids and equipment

I save my jars and wash them and the tops in hot soapy water. Jars with nice wide tops are easiest to fill. It is nice to soak off the labels before hand - but, as you can see I haven't soaked mine.

Put the jar tops, ladle and the funnel into a pan, cover the tops with water and bring to the boil with the pan covered. This will sterilize them. It is important that your jars, lids and any other equipment are sterile, otherwise moulds and bacteria will spoil the jam. Having said that, a little mould on the top of the jam is normal, and my great aunt just scraped it off. I do the same.

I sterilise the jars in the microwave by pouring a little water into the bottom of each and microwaving on full for 3-4 minutes. If you don't have a microwave you can put them into a traditional oven.


Fill the jars

Fill the jars right to the top. This helps to preserve the jam. Cover with jam papers if you wish. The screw on the tops loosely. Let them cool a little and tighten the tops. I leave mine at this point - as you can see, but if you wish - and traditionally this is always done, label the jams with type and date. Once you have mastered the art of jam making, there are many delicious and unusual jams to make that will help you preserve the summer and autumn glutsof fruit and vegetables.

Marrow and ginger jam

Doesn't it look lovely in the Limousin sunshine?
Doesn't it look lovely in the Limousin sunshine? | Source

Lovely fruit for my peach jam recipe

When the peaches are ready they come by the ton and a great way to use the peach glut is to make peach jam.
When the peaches are ready they come by the ton and a great way to use the peach glut is to make peach jam. | Source

Labeled for sale

Find a range of beautiful jam labels for your home made jam. you can personalize them by adding your own text.
Find a range of beautiful jam labels for your home made jam. you can personalize them by adding your own text. | Source
Visit my online Zazzle store for a variety of pretty jam labels which you can customize by adding your own text
Visit my online Zazzle store for a variety of pretty jam labels which you can customize by adding your own text | Source
Source

Decorate your homemade marrow and ginger jam

I've used our Les Trois Chenes honey pot with label as an illustration because I don't usually put fancy labels on our jam as we consume it all ourselves. You might take a pride, however, in labeling and decorating your jars of jam for your own use, as gifts or even to sell.

We do sell our honey and so we use new jars and our own labels for all our products that we offer for sale. There are certain laws you have to comply with when selling produce. The weight should always be marked on the jar. You will easily be able to find label suppliers on line.

You can also make pretty caps for your jars from cloth or decorative paper.

Cherry clafoutis - a Limousin speciality
Cherry clafoutis - a Limousin speciality

Local Limousin produce is a real treat

If you're interested in finding out more about our life in the sleepy hamlet of Videix, Limousin, South West France then take a look at our website: www.lestroischenes.com. We are always making jams, jellies and all sorts of good things for ourselves and our guests. We run a Bed and Breakfast, have a lovely gite with grape vines and peach trees in the garden and we offer painting courses and holidays.

Food is so much a part of our region, called 'the bread basket of France' and the gardens and countryside are full of fruits, vegetables and herbs all just there for the picking.

There is a rich variety of traditional and local dishes here in Limousin for you to sample, fabulous beef from the world famous Limousin cattle, pork from the 'black bottom' pigs, chestnuts made into liqueurs, cakes and preserves and so much more.

Every year we harvest cherries, plums, peaches, apples, elderberries, blackberries, grapes and medlars and we make them into jams, jellies cakes and all manner of delicious things so why not take a look for yourself and discover this beautiful and hidden part of France.

Will you try my jam recipes?

Are you enthused to make marrow and ginger jam?

  • Yes, got marrows and ready to go
  • Yes, as soon as my marrows grow
  • Not sure
  • No Way!
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© 2009 Les Trois Chenes

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