Make your own butter at home from excess leftover cream

 

With the ever-increasing price rises of our daily living expenses, we all need to save money where we can. By making, your own butter you get that little bit of exercise if using a hand beater and can use up the cream before it goes sour.

Years ago, we had a cow, and the fresh milk and cream was terrific. We waited for mum to boil it and then she left it in the fridge and my sister and I used to sneak in and pinch the top off it. Hey, it was yummy.

I hear you say cream is expensive too, I know. You need to watch out for shopping day specials and always buy the whipping cream to make it when on special. I bought 2 liters of whipping cream for $1.50. (Don't tell anyone) I used 1 liter of it on our sweets. I know naughty, naughty, but gee, it was nice.

It is simple to make.

Pour in cream and beat

Buttermilk starts to separate

Requirements

 

All you will need is the Whipping cream, (this is the best) either a hand held beater (if you are energetic) or an electric Kenwood chef mixer (or similar). I used a hand held electric one, a large bowl, a wooden spoon, and a pinch of salt. (optional)

Directions

Tip cream into preferred large mixing bowl, you do not want it splattered all over the place. Add pinch of salt if required and beat and beat. This will take several minutes. Gradually you will notice it thickens like when beating cream normally. Then you will notice it starting to get yellow bits in it. This is the start of the butter forming.

Keep beating, now you will see the buttermilk in the bottom of the dish. Pour this off; you can use this in cooking. Once it has turned into butter you need to take out all the buttermilk. In the old days, my mum had two little battens with ridges to remove the last of the milk. As we do not have these just keep patting it with the back of the spoon.

Pour off the buttermilk

Finished butter

Make sure you wash out all the milk

It is very important to remove all of the milk or it will go rancid. Pour cold water into the basin with the butter and beat on low speed, pour off and add clean water again, now continue to remove all the milk until the water is clear.

When complete, pat with the back of a wooden spoon, making sure there is no milk. Form into an oblong or sausage shape, the choice is yours.

You can freeze this, although if freezing do not add the salt. Now, wait for that whipping cream to come on special and make your own butter following these simple instructions.

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Comments 37 comments

oberbreckling 8 years ago

Hi Eileen I got a feeling this butter taste better than what I buy from the store I want to try this so are you Im a guy so Im a little stupid here but are you talking about using whip cream as whip cream for pies sorry stupid here or what kind exactly give me a comment back plz,I understand the rest and I think Im wrong about the cream lol~cool~cya


John Chancellor profile image

John Chancellor 8 years ago from Tennessee

I remember as a child churning butter. This was when we had our own cow - we certainly could never have afforded milk from the store. But the cream would rise to the top and we would pour off the cream and save it until we had enough to churn. The churn was about a quart size jar with a lid. There was a hole in the lid and you churned the cream with a laddle. It probably took about half an hour but we had two by products - butter and buttermilk.

Thanks for brining back some childhood memories.


GoogleCashMoney profile image

GoogleCashMoney 8 years ago from Mumbai, India

Hey Eileen You will saving lot of our money. We will surely use your method. Let see..


Eileen Hughes profile image

Eileen Hughes 8 years ago from Northam Western Australia Author

Oberbreckling, The cream I used is definitely Whipping Cream. That is what it said on the label. the normal cream evidently does not work to good, from what I have heard. Also I forgot to put in the hub. Do it when cream is cold. It beats up better. Thanks for stopping by.


Eileen Hughes profile image

Eileen Hughes 8 years ago from Northam Western Australia Author

John, This hubpages is bringing lots of memories of ours back. Each time I read something it reminds me of something about our childhood. We used to love pinching the cream off the top.

Google cash, Hope it works for you it is really simple just lot of beating. best with mixmaster.


BeatsMe profile image

BeatsMe 8 years ago

Hi Eileen, this is a good hub. But I think it's going to consume a lot of time making homemade butter.


raguett profile image

raguett 8 years ago

Hey thats really cool...I can't wait to try it, I think the kids would think it's neat too...great hub...


Eileen Hughes profile image

Eileen Hughes 8 years ago from Northam Western Australia Author

Beats me. Like your name your going to give in ...hahah Thanks

raguett.. Yes it takes time but would keep the kids out of mischief that for sure. Thanks


Constant Walker profile image

Constant Walker 8 years ago from Springfield, Oregon

Great hub, and it looks pretty easy, too. But I'm not clear on one point: After the butter is a solid in the bowl and you're pouring off the buttermilk, you say to add cold water and mix again, repeating until the water is clear, right? But, I don't see how I could "mix" this solid with the water. Won't that break it up again? Or, if not, how would I "mix" this at all?

I know, I'm a Dorkus-Malorkus.


Camille 8 years ago

This is awesome. I get all excited about being able to make anything from scratch. Thanks for the instructions!


Eileen Hughes profile image

Eileen Hughes 8 years ago from Northam Western Australia Author

camille, Glad to give you something new to try. Thanks for stopping by


Eileen Hughes profile image

Eileen Hughes 8 years ago from Northam Western Australia Author

constant walker, when you pour the milk off, you add the water and beat on slow again. yes it will break up but it will mix with the water and wash the milk out. keep repeating with fresh water until it is clean water. It is not a complete solid blob until you push it into one. I just pushed it together on side of bowl to make it show milk better. Hope that explains. cheers thanks for stopping by


cjcs profile image

cjcs 8 years ago from Albuquerque, NM

Sometimes there's a difference between creamy nomenclatures between countries. For example, between the US and UK we get: Whipping Cream* (US 30-36% butterfat) (UK 35%) *also known as "Light Whipping Cream" sometimes in US; and Heavy Cream (US)**/Double Cream (UK) (US >=36%) (UK 48%) **also known as "Heavy Whipping Cream" in the US.

Since the making of butter tends to go better with butterfat levels 35% or more, and since US packagers like to find false economies wherever they can, US home-butter-makers might want to avoid the Whipping Cream and instead go straight for the Heavy Cream--which does make some very tasty butter, indeed (and excellent whipped cream if you stop just short of it becoming butter).

CJ


Eileen Hughes profile image

Eileen Hughes 8 years ago from Northam Western Australia Author

Cjcs. Gee you have done the homework for everyone now. Thanks for all that. Now all over the world can make butter, with whichever one needed in each country.. Great help. thanks cj. And thanks for stopping by


Constant Walker profile image

Constant Walker 8 years ago from Springfield, Oregon

It does. Thanks. I'm going to give this a try. Mmmm, home-made butter.


Eileen Hughes profile image

Eileen Hughes 8 years ago from Northam Western Australia Author

Constant Walker, Actually I had some of mine today and it is good. The only thing with butter, which is same in the shops it is hard to spread. I would use within 2 weeks. Unless you freeze it . But then dont add the salt. Lets know how you go. Remember slow speed unless you want it all around the room for decorations. Above all Have fun....haha


MM Del Rosario profile image

MM Del Rosario 8 years ago from NSW, Australia

i have to bookmarked this one, will be showing it to my daughter who consume a lot of butter....thanks E.


SweetiePie profile image

SweetiePie 8 years ago from Southern California, USA

What a great idea and much better than store bought. Thanks for the good hub.


Eileen Hughes profile image

Eileen Hughes 8 years ago from Northam Western Australia Author

mm del rosario, thanks hope she has fun making and eating it.

Sweetie pie. thanks, yes its a bit of work but give you satisfaction being able to do it yourself. And hasnt go so many additives.


MrMarmalade profile image

MrMarmalade 8 years ago from Sydney

My Mother use to make butter, Dad was the manager of a large Dairy Company.

He brought lots of milk and cream home.

Mum Churned it into butter.

We are not big butter eaters now days.

Thanks for the Memories.


Eileen Hughes profile image

Eileen Hughes 8 years ago from Northam Western Australia Author

Mr M. No problems thanks for reading. Our memories are the most important thing we have at our age. As long as we can remember we are doing ok. Thanks


SweetiePie profile image

SweetiePie 8 years ago from Southern California, USA

I forgot to mention my mom used to like to eat the cream just like you described. She grew up in Kansas and her cousins had cows, so they had fresh milk all the time. I like the nostalgia of your hubs. I am going to tell my mom about this one, she will like it.


Eileen Hughes profile image

Eileen Hughes 8 years ago from Northam Western Australia Author

Sweetiepie, definitely. It all in the memory banks. Sometimes it needs a big big jog to bring it back though. Thanks for that. hope she likes it.


evemurphy profile image

evemurphy 8 years ago from Ottawa

Saving money can also be deeeelicious! Thanks Eileen! :)


Eileen Hughes profile image

Eileen Hughes 8 years ago from Northam Western Australia Author

evemurphy, You sure not wrong there. We all need those crisp little notes in our hot hands, that for sure.


alexadry profile image

alexadry 8 years ago from USA

Very interesting, I will give it a try!


Eileen Hughes profile image

Eileen Hughes 8 years ago from Northam Western Australia Author

Alexadry Thanks for stopping by


C.S.Alexis profile image

C.S.Alexis 8 years ago from NW Indiana

I tried this about thirty years ago and failed miserably. I decided to stick to putting the heavy cream in my strong coffee. Sometimes I just know when to throw in the churn. How I do love real butter! This was fun. C.S.


Eileen Hughes profile image

Eileen Hughes 8 years ago from Northam Western Australia Author

Alexis, thanks for that, The only thing I hate is that it is so hard to spread. Otherwise great.


C.J. King profile image

C.J. King 8 years ago from Southeast

Wouldn't that be delicious made from raw milk!!!

:-)

C.J.


Eileen Hughes profile image

Eileen Hughes 8 years ago from Northam Western Australia Author

cjking, I know we used to skim the cream part of the milk after milking the cow and made butter from that. That is of course if us kids hadnt already pinched the cream. It was great. Thanks for stopping by


cgull8m profile image

cgull8m 8 years ago from North Carolina

Wonderful Hub Eileen, I will definitely try this and have it instead of store made butter, which hardly tastes any good.


Eileen Hughes profile image

Eileen Hughes 8 years ago from Northam Western Australia Author

Cgull, I have just finished using that one that I made, and I have to be honest I did not wash it as much as should. but it kept for two weeks. I was in too much of a hurry to get it done to put up here.

Thanks for stopping by.


christinecook profile image

christinecook 6 years ago

i love butter. great idea my son would certainly enjoy doing this.


Eileen Hughes profile image

Eileen Hughes 6 years ago from Northam Western Australia Author

christine, yes it is something that he could help with. And it uses the cream up.


molometer profile image

molometer 4 years ago

Handy tip, now I know how to make butter.I may give it a go. Thanks


Eileen Hughes profile image

Eileen Hughes 4 years ago from Northam Western Australia Author

Thanks molometer, Makes a change from the bought product and at least you know what is in it.

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