Chinese Mung Bean (Green Bean) Soup Recipe - Superfood with Medicinal Values

Pandan leaves are very fragrant, adding a pleasant scent to dishes. A wonderful complement to sugar syrups and coconut milk, their distinct aroma and taste also make them a flavouring of choice, at par perhaps with vanilla or chocolate.
Pandan leaves are very fragrant, adding a pleasant scent to dishes. A wonderful complement to sugar syrups and coconut milk, their distinct aroma and taste also make them a flavouring of choice, at par perhaps with vanilla or chocolate. | Source

Mung Bean Soup (綠豆湯) Recipe

Serving portion : 6

Ingredients

200 g mung beans

125 g Palm sugar or gula Melaka (can be replaced with sugar)

1.5 liter Water

2 pieces Pandan or screwpine leaves (optional)

4 tbsp Coconut milk

1/4 tsp salt (depending on your taste preference)

3 tbsp White or brown sugar (add according to taste)

4 tbsp sago pearl (optional)

Methods

1) soak the green peas for 4 hours or overnight. Ensure that the water volume is double the volume of green peas.

2) Soak the sago for half an hour or more. Sieve the sago over running water from the pipe to remove the powdery residue.

3) Pour the soaked and washed green peas into a pot with 1.5l of water or more such that the water level is about 3 inches above the green peas level. Add in the pandan leaves which is tied into a knot. Let it boil, then simmer with lower heat for approximately 45 minutes until the beans are almost tender (almost cooked).

4) Add in the sago pearls and cook till sago pearl is transparent. Remember to stir all the time when sago is added, to prevent them from sticking to the bottom of the pot and burnt.

5) Add in sugar and Palm sugar. Continue stirring until the sugar melted.

6) Add in coconut milk.

And it is ready to be served hot or cold.

Medicinal Properties

Mung bean sprouts have been grown by the Chinese for over 5000 years. The medicinal properties of mung beans is well documented in the book “Chinese System of Food Cures” by Henry C. Lu. Mung bean has a long history of food and medicinal uses, with a written record dating back to the 10th century A.D. It is best known to be used for treatment of poisoning of various types, including foods (e.g., mushroom) and herbal drugs (e.g., aconite). In modern times, with pollution becoming an issue, mung bean has extended its use to treat against industrial and environmental poisoning (e.g. pesticides, heavy metals, etc.). Some of these treatments have been reported in Chinese herbal and traditional medical journals in recent years.

For people who avoid consuming beans due to digestive difficulties will be surprised to find that mung beans are relatively easy to digest. They do not generally create abdominal gas or bloating, the drawbacks of larger beans. More importantly, mung beans provide cleansing and detoxifying properties as mentioned above. Rich in potassium, mung bean is beneficial for the cardiovascular and nervous systems. For vegetarian and health-conscious meat eaters, mung beans are part of the legume family which are also a good source of high quality protein. A cup of cooked mung beans contain 14 gms of protein. Rich in fiber, mung bean works to keep healthy cholesterol levels. Mung beans are also rich in iron, thiamin, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, copper and folate, which help many other bodily functions for optimum health. When sprouted, mung beans contain vitamin C that is not found in the bean itself.

Although Chinese people like to consume mung bean products as desserts, it is often eaten with therapeutic intentions. The consumption of mung bean is especially popular in hot summer to prevent heatstroke, heat rash or prickly heat.

Mung beans, mature seeds, cooked, boiled, without salt, 1 cup

Nutrient
Units
1.00 X 1 cup, 202g
Proximates
 
 
Water
g
146.77
Energy
kcal
212
Energy
kj
891
Protein
g
14.18
Total lipid (fat)
g
0.77
Ash
g
1.6
Carbohydrate, by difference
g
38.68
Fiber, total dietary
g
15.4
Sugars, total
g
4.04
Minerals
 
 
Calcium, Ca
mg
55
Iron, Fe
mg
2.83
Magnesium, Mg
mg
97
Phosphorus, P
mg
200
Potassium, K
mg
537
Sodium, Na
mg
4
Zinc, Zn
mg
1.7
Copper, Cu
mg
0.315
Manganese, Mn
mg
0.602
Selenium, Se
mcg
5
Vitamins
 
 
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
mg
2
Thiamin
mg
0.331
Riboflavin
mg
0.123
Niacin
mg
1.166
Pantothenic acid
mg
0.828
Vitamin B-6
mg
0.135
Folate, total
mcg
321
Folic acid
mcg
0
Folate, food
mcg
321
Folate, DFE
mcg_DFE
321
Vitamin B-12
mcg
0
Vitamin B-12, added
mcg
0
Vitamin A, IU
IU
48
Vitamin A, RAE
mcg_RAE
2
Retinol
mcg
0
Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol)
mg
0.3
Vitamin E, added
mg
0
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
mcg
5.5
Lipids
 
 
Fatty acids, total saturated
g
0.234
4:00
g
0
6:00
g
0
8:00
g
0
10:00
g
0
12:00
g
0
14:00
g
0
16:00
g
0.168
18:00
g
0.048
Fatty acids, total monounsaturated
g
0.109
16:1 undifferentiated
g
0
18:1 undifferentiated
g
0.109
20:01
g
0
22:1 undifferentiated
g
0
Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated
g
0.259
18:2 undifferentiated
g
0.24
18:3 undifferentiated
g
0.018
18:04
g
0
20:4 undifferentiated
g
0
20:5 n-3
g
0
22:5 n-3
g
0
22:6 n-3
g
0
Cholesterol
mg
0
Amino acids
 
 
Tryptophan
g
0.154
Threonine
g
0.465
Isoleucine
g
0.6
Leucine
g
1.099
Lysine
g
0.99
Methionine
g
0.17
Cystine
g
0.125
Phenylalanine
g
0.858
Tyrosine
g
0.424
Valine
g
0.735
Arginine
g
0.994
Histidine
g
0.414
Alanine
g
0.624
Aspartic acid
g
1.64
Glutamic acid
g
2.537
Glycine
g
0.568
Proline
g
0.652
Serine
g
0.699
Other
 
 
Alcohol, ethyl
g
0
Caffeine
mg
0
Theobromine
mg
0
Carotene, beta
mcg
28
Carotene, alpha
mcg
0
Cryptoxanthin, beta
mcg
0
Lycopene
mcg
0
Lutein + zeaxanthin
mcg
0
USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 18 (2005)
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Comments 14 comments

Pollyannalana profile image

Pollyannalana 5 years ago from US

Great recipe and more I see I need to check out!

Polly


Ingenira profile image

Ingenira 5 years ago Author

Glad you love it, PaperNotes. Hmmm, your recipe sounds delicious. Do you share it on Hubpages ?


PaperNotes profile image

PaperNotes 5 years ago

I love mung beans! I do cook mung beans for my family. Mine is a simple recipe of sauteed garlic, onion and smoked fish with mung beans. Thanks for the recipe.


Ingenira profile image

Ingenira 5 years ago Author

Glad you like it just by looking at it, Nightweaver. :) Thanks for commenting.


Nightweaver 5 years ago

Mmmmmmmm, mung bean soup. I've eaten this before, my mother and sister has prepared it for me. It's pretty good. Thanks for posting this! I need to try making it myself sometime.


Ingenira profile image

Ingenira 5 years ago Author

thank you, TheListLady. Welcome to my page. Wow, you lived in S. Korea before, that must be a wonderful experience for you. And glad you like this recipe.


TheListLady profile image

TheListLady 5 years ago from New York City

This is sooooo good. When I lived in S. Korea I had the pleasure of enjoying mung bean soup. Excellent. Thanks for the super recipe and all the nutritional information.

What a great hub - rated up - and for sure I will be following you. Yay!


Ben Zoltak profile image

Ben Zoltak 5 years ago from Lake Mills, Jefferson County, Wisconsin USA

ah ha so that's what's screwpine looks like neat!


Ingenira profile image

Ingenira 5 years ago Author

Thanks for visiting, Ben. This recipe is common Southeast Asian dessert. I have added a photo of screwpine or pandan leave for you to see. It's commonly used to add fragrance to cakes and dessert here.

The soup sweetness can be adjusted by adding more water or ice cubes to the dish. :)


Ben Zoltak profile image

Ben Zoltak 5 years ago from Lake Mills, Jefferson County, Wisconsin USA

I've never heard of Mung beans Ingenira, they sound tasty, also, what the heck is a screwpine? Sounds hilarious, lol. All of this sounds exotic. What I don't get is, it sounds like a very sweet soup. Or doesn't it taste too sweet as a soup?

Can't wait to try some, thanks for the introduction.

Ben


Ingenira profile image

Ingenira 5 years ago Author

thanks for visiting, Tony. Yes, mung beans is a rich source of purines too like many other legumes, not very helpful for the gout. :)

Have you tried to lower your uric acid level in your body with much success ?


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 5 years ago from South Africa

Thanks for this woderful looking recipe and all the info about mung beans. I have been told notto eat beans as they contain purines which aggravate my gout. Do mung beans also contain purines?

Thanks for sharing.

Love and peace

Tony


Ingenira profile image

Ingenira 5 years ago Author

Appreciate your comment wordscribe43. Let me know the ingredients you are not familiar with and you cannot get it from the Asian supermarket, I can suggest substitute for you.

Oh ya, we both have the same numbers of hubs, how cool is that !


wordscribe43 profile image

wordscribe43 5 years ago from Pacific Northwest, USA

Oh my goodness, that sounds soooo good. I love anything with coconut milk. I love all kinds of beans, but really haven't experimented much with the mung variety. There are a few ingredients I'm not familiar with, but we live near a HUGE Chinese supermarket. I love experimenting with new foods and ingredients, especially healthy ones. Thanks for sharing...

Hey, I just noticed you and I have the exact same number of hubs!!!

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