Mustard Health Benefits, Mustard Nutrition Facts and Uses

Mustard (Brassica juncea) not only tastes nice, but it is very nutritious and healthy. The plant belongs to the Brassica Family, like broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage and radish.

Mustard seeds have been renowned for their medicinal benefits since the days of the ancient Romans and Greeks as well as being cherished as a spice.

Mustards originated in Asia Minor, but now cultivated in many temperate climates throughout the world including India, China, Canada and many European countries.

Mustards are mostly grown as winter crops with the annual plant reaching about 1.5m (4-5 feet) in height. The seeds, about 1mm in diameter, are contained in pods similar to green pea pod.

The three main varieties of mustard are White, Brown and Black Mustard. Mustard oil is extracted from the seeds and is used in cooking and as a medicine.

This article highlights the health benefits of mustard seeds as a food item and provides a chart of the nutrition facts.

Though high in calories, mustard seeds are very rich in vitamins, minerals, vitamins and anti-oxidants and phyto-nutrients.

Learn more about the health benefits of mustard.

Mustard seeds are tiny but are packed with oil and essential nutrients
Mustard seeds are tiny but are packed with oil and essential nutrients | Source
Mustard seeds are highly nutritious, but have high calorie contents due to the oil content
Mustard seeds are highly nutritious, but have high calorie contents due to the oil content | Source
Mustard seeds can be used not only as a condiment but as ingredient for many spicy meat dishes
Mustard seeds can be used not only as a condiment but as ingredient for many spicy meat dishes | Source
Mustard seeds pair well with potatoes and make a fine addition to potato side dishes and potato salads
Mustard seeds pair well with potatoes and make a fine addition to potato side dishes and potato salads | Source

Health Benefits of Mustard Seeds (see Chart)

► Being rich in oil, mustard seeds have very high calories, with 100 g of seeds yielding 508 calories.

► Mustard seeds are rich in B-complex vitamins such as folates, pyridoxine (vitamin B6), niacin, thiamin, riboflavin and pantothenic acid. There are about 4.7 mg of niacin (vitamin B-3) in 100 g of seeds which is about 25% of the daily requirement.

► Mustard seeds are a rich source of antioxidants, both flavonoid and carotenoid. These compounds include zea-xanthin, carotenes and lutein.

► Mustard seeds have high levels if vitamin E, with 100 g containing about 20 mg per 100 g which is 130% of the recommended daily allowance for Vitamin E.

► The seeds are rich in many essential minerals such as calcium, copper, iron, manganese, zinc and particularly selenium. The amount of minerals in 100 g of seeds exceeds the daily allowance for iron, manganese and magnesium. The level of selenium is almost 400% times the daily allowance.

► Mustard seeds are rich in Protein (26 g for a 100 g serving) and Fiber (12 g). But total fat content is high at 36 g per 100 g of seeds.

Medicinal Uses of Mustard Seeds

Mustard seeds and mustard oil have traditionally been used to relieve rheumatism, muscle pain, arthritic pain and as a laxative and stimulant for the digestive system.

Culinary Uses of Mustard Seeds, Pastes and Powders

Mustards are very popular in Pakistani, Indian, Bangladesh, German and Mediterranean cooking. They are popular in sauces and pastes and mustard oil is widely used in cooking. The seed generally need to be fried or heated to release their aroma and taste, Some of the other culinary uses are:

► Pickling and marinades

► Fish curries and Indian seafood dishes

► Mustard paste is used in salad dressings, mayonnaise and many sauce.

► Added to stir fries when cooking ginger and garlic.

► Added to lentil dishes like daal, and also chickpea dishes

► Added to soups and noodle dishes

► Mustard pastes and seeds pair well with: potatoes, eggs, fish, roasted, grilled and barbecued meats and can be added to casseroles, stews and curries

► Mustard seeds and pastes also enhance the flavor of vegetables (roasted and steamed)

Were you aware that Mustard was healthy and good for you?

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Nutrient Summary for Whole Mustard Seeds (100 g)

Nutrients in 100g serving
Nutrient Value
Energy
508
Carbohydrates
28.09 g
Protein
26.08 g
Total Fat
36.24 g
Cholesterol
0 mg
Dietary Fiber
12.2 g
Vitamins
****
Folates
162 mcg
Niacin
4.73 mg
Pantothenic acid
0.81 mg
Pyridoxine
0.4 mg
Riboflavin
0.26 mg
Thiamin
0.8 mg
Vitamin A
31 IU
Vitamin C
7.1 mg
Vitamin E
19.82 mg
Vitamin K
5.4 mcg
Minerals
****
Sodium
13 mg
Potassium
738 mg
Calcium
266 mg
Copper
0.65 mg
Iron
9.21 mg
Magnesium
370 mg
Manganese
2.5 mg
Selenium
208 mcg
Zinc
6.08 mg
Phyto-nutrients
****
Carotene-beta
18 mcg
Crypto-xanthin-beta
0 mcg
Lutein-zeaxanthin
508 mcg

© 2013 Dr. John Anderson

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Comments 1 comment

sallieannluvslife profile image

sallieannluvslife 3 years ago from Eastern Shore

Very informative hub! I love whole grain mustard...especially on a soft pretzel...and in sauces...Great hub!

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