Ode to a Moosehead Beer

A glass of beer is like a story. It has a beginning, a middle and an end. The enticing caramel coloured foam is the introduction, the intriquing body of the lager and the ending leaving one thirsting for the sequel.

Enjoying our beverage leads to pondering deep questions that have vexed man for millenia - drinking from the bottle or an ice-cold stein, which is best? There's a special name for people who drink wine from the bottle - winos, but Canadians are deeply divided on this question like the rift that separates English Canadians from French Canadians. Bottle drinkers and glass drinkers, we are two solitudes.

I always drink my Moosehead from a chilled glass even when fishing from my birchbark canoe. The beer craftmen at Molsons have invested years in creating the perfect foam with just the right consistency. I can't let them down. After slowly pouring the golden essence into my stein I take a moment to meditate on the perfect foam and golden liquor while offering a silent libation to the Beer God. Bless me Father for I have sinned, let me into heaven once more.

Next question - lager or ale? Well to answer that we must appeal to history. The Egyptians who ruled their beer and building empire for 3000 yearst. They let small loaves of grainy dough called bacio sour in the sun, then squeezed out the fermented liquor. The slaves drank the first brew through hollow reeds while the haughty Royalty used straws pounded out of gold.

Much later the Germans codified the beer laws and during the diaspora of the 1800s built more than 50000 breweries all over the world. The final chapter of this story leads to New Brunswick Canada where the high priests at Molsons have reached the culmination of brewing. by adding a unique ingredient only avialable in Canada aging in Caniadian white oak barrels lined with moose skins - Moosehead Canadian lager. It doesn't get any better.

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