Old Thanksgiving - Pie Nation and The Great Uninvited Guests

The Three Sisters of Native Americana on a $1.00 coin.
The Three Sisters of Native Americana on a $1.00 coin.

The First Surprise Party

As American as Apple Pie?

I recently read a news column that began with this question:

Pumpkin or Mincemeat, which says “Thanksgiving” more?

SURPRISE! – Considering that historic day back in 1621's Plymouth Colony, then neither choice is the answer, because there was no pie on that day.

As it was, the event turned out to be a total surprise party.

The Englishmen of Plymouth invited one Native American gentleman to have dinner with them, but in the sharing tradition of his indigenous nation, the invited quest brought about 98 relatives and friends with him.

Fortunately, they brought food as well: corn, squash, pumpkins, several wild game fowl, and 5 deer. I can just see the children laughing at the look on their elders’ faces when about 100 “Indians” came to dinner with large game animals in tow.

That was probably the first party in America to which too many uninvited guests showed up and the tradition has endured for 400 years, despite Emily Post -- Too many guests at weddings and dinners have plagued special events here for centuries.

Let's skip ahead to the 20thcentury, when the Canadian and American governments declared official days of thanksgiving as federal holidays. America became Pie Nation, We bake dozens of varieties of pies for special events like that in the famous Norman Rockwell Thanksgiving Day portrait, Freedom From Want. In the 2000s, pies are an integral part of our holidays and celebrations. They can all say “Thanksgiving.” So, how do we make pies?

All in Good Humor: "Trading for a Turkey" - 1923

J.C. Leyendecker (public domain, Library of Congress).
J.C. Leyendecker (public domain, Library of Congress).

Miracles - A Flaky Pie Crust

Let’s start with the pie dough.There are several recipes for pie dough, but a lot of home bakers search for the perfect recipe for a flaky crust. A couple of tips help with that.

First, it's important not to handle the pie dough too much, because it can become too tough fairly quickly. Pie dough is not bread and does not need to be kneaded.

Second, it helps to cut in only half of the fat you use with the flour, and then to cut in the second half of the fat, rather than to do it all at once. I've done this successfully with shortening, butter, and margarine, but it also works with lard.

Pie Dough

  • 2 Cups all purpose flour (I've also used whole wheat)
  • 2/3 stick of butter, up to 1 whole stick of butter [or margarine or lard] -- This would be from 5 Tablespoons (marked on the wrapper), up to the whole stick. If the air is very dry on the day that you bake, use more butter. Increasing the water used will make a tough or hard ring of dough around the pie pan.
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • OPTIONAL – 2 or 3 Tbsp sugar for a sweet crust. Brown or white sugar are both good for this.
  • 5-6 Tablespoons of cold water

DIRECTIONS

  • Place the flour and salt into a large mixing bowl and stir to combine.
  • Cut in one-half of the butter with two knives or a pastry cutter, until the mixture forms globules that look about the size of peas.
  • Cut in the second half of the butter, until you see the mixture looking like very coarse meal. If you see something that looks like sand, you have over processed the mixture and it might come out baked like a cookie.
  • Add cold water a spoonful at a time and toss with a fork until you have a smooth ball – not wet and not sticky. Divide the ball in half and roll the bottom crust on a clean, floured surface with a floured rolling pin.
  • Drape the bottom crust carefully over the rolling pin, transfer it to an 8” or 9” pie pan, and arrange it as needed.
  • Roll out the top crust when needed and drape it over the filling in the same way, crimp the edges of both crusts together in a decorative way.
  • Slice a few small air vents in the center around the top crust to allow cooking gasses to escape.

If you need only one crust, you can freeze the second one for 6 months,or you can cut the recipe in half.

Thanksgiving and Christmas Fillings

In honor of the first uninvited guests, here are some great fillings made from the Three Sisters of the Native Americans – Squash, Corn And Beans.

BUTTERNUT SQUASH PIE

  • 1 medium sized butternut squash
  • 1 cup light brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 cup evaporated milk
  • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • 1 pinch each of ground allspice, cloves, ginger, and nutmeg
  • 1 unbaked 9# pie shell

Peel and cube the squash. Steam squash for 15 minutes until fork tender. Drain, and cool. Preheat oven to 350 F. In a blender, combine squash, brown sugar, cornstarch, egg, milk, cinnamon, allspice, cloves, ginger, and nutmeg. Blend until smooth. Pour into the unbaked pie shell. Bake in 50 minutes, or until a knife inserted in center comes out clean.

ZUCCHINI PIE


  • 7 cups of sliced zucchini - pared, seeds removed, sliced crosswise into ¼” thick slices.
  • 1 ¼ cup granulated sugar
  • 1 ½ tablespoon flour
  • 1 ½ tablespoon cream of tartar
  • 1 ½ tablespoon cinnamon
  • Dash of salt and nutmeg

TOPPING:

  • ½ stick margarine, 1 cup flour, and 1 teaspoon cinnamon

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Place sliced zucchini in boiling water, reduce heat and simmer until tender- crisp. Drain and cool. Add remaining ingredients; mix, place in pie shell of choice. Mix topping ingredients and sprinkle on top of filling. Bake 1 hour.


YELLOW SQUASH PIE - No Crust

  • 2 Cups yellow squash, cooked and drained
  • 4 Whole eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 Cup granulated sugar
  • 4 Tablespoons lemon extract
  • 9-inch pie plate

Lightly butter or cooking spray a pie plate. In mixing bowl, put cooked and drained squash, eggs, and sugar together and stir. Add lemon extract, stir and pour into the pie plate. Bake 40 minutes until custard consistency is achieved..Serve cold for dessert.

CORN AND BEAN PIE

  • ! pie crust (bottom crust only)
  • 3 Cups cooked kidney beans & the lquid
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 Cup celery, chopped
  • 1 whole green bell pepper, chopped
  • 1/2 Cup tomatoes, stewed
  • 1 Cup corn
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1/2 tsp cumin
  • 1/2 tsp oregano
  • 1/2 Cup sliced black olives - save some of the liquid
  • Shredded cheese

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Steam vegetables in 4 Tablespoons of liquid from olives, until onion is transparent. Add the seasonings, kidney beans, and reserved liquid, stir, and pour into the pie crust. Bake 30 minutes and remove from oven. Top with olives, and shredded cheese, bake 10 minutes longer, and serve.

BEAN PIE

  • 1 unbaked 9" pie crust
  • 3 (15 or 16 oz) cans any bean, drained and mashed
  • 3 Large eggs
  • 1/4 Cup melted salted butter
  • 1 Tbsp cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon, ginger, and cloves
  • 1 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 Cup evaporated milk
  • 1 Cup brown sugar

Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. All ingredients except pie crust and stir well. Pour into pie crust and bake 15 minutes. Lower heat to 350 and bake 30 minutes, until center of pie is set.

No deer pie today.(public domain)
No deer pie today.(public domain)

Pies on Amazon.Com

More by this Author


Comments 25 comments

moonlake profile image

moonlake 7 years ago from America

We always have oatmeal pie for Thanksgiving and Christmas. ENjoyed your hub


Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty Inglish, MS 7 years ago from North America Author

I hqve heard of that and I think I've seen the recipe on Hub Pages or Suidoo. I'll look! :)


ajcor profile image

ajcor 7 years ago from NSW. Australia

I didn't know about your country being the Pie Nation - enjoyed reading the recipes - hope the jackalope doesn't get cream on his ears as he eats his thanksgiving pud!! cheers


Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty Inglish, MS 7 years ago from North America Author

I think it's the Fat nation now, LOL. I just would like it to be Pie Nation. That jackalope and his tribe are busy, aren't they?


Rochelle Frank profile image

Rochelle Frank 7 years ago from California Gold Country

Yes- pies are great. I'm better at cakes, but pumpkin pie is my all time favorite. I think the squash pie must be similar, since pumpkin is an oversized squash.

The Lydendecker depiction of Indian and Pilgrim is charming and humorous, though obviously unrealistic. For one thing, the pilgrim would not have had that kind of a"pot".

Looking at your bean pie makes me think that any starchy  or high fiber vegetable  could be a pie. I think I would like it.

Great hub.


Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty Inglish, MS 7 years ago from North America Author

You're right! That "pilgrim" would have been thinner than the "Indian." Now I'm really laughing!


Zsuzsy Bee profile image

Zsuzsy Bee 7 years ago from Ontario/Canada

I'm always on pie duty at all the holidays. Thanks for sharing another great hub.

Happy Thankgiving to you Patty kindest regards Zsuzsy


Jerilee Wei profile image

Jerilee Wei 7 years ago from United States

Enjoyed the hub and I'm going to have to try a couple of these pie recipes.


countrywomen profile image

countrywomen 7 years ago from Washington, USA

Patty- As usual another great hub. I will make one of these recipes during the holidays. I just hope Iam not too tempted to hog on goodies these holidays...hehe


glassvisage profile image

glassvisage 7 years ago from Northern California

Great historical intro to this treasure trove of recipes!


Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty Inglish, MS 7 years ago from North America Author

Zsuszy - I know your pies must be delicious and I hope your daughter's culinary program included them as well. I had to adjust the level of butter I used in the crusts yesrterday and use more, because the air was SO dry here on Thanksgiving.

Jerilee, countrywomen, and glassvisage - best wishes in your own unique holiday traditions. I hope these pies recipes bring some joy and good eating.


B.T. Evilpants profile image

B.T. Evilpants 7 years ago from Hell, MI

Sorry I'm late. Hope I didn't miss out on your pies! I was working my way through some mince meat, apple, and pumpkin of my own.


Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty Inglish, MS 7 years ago from North America Author

Oh, you have mincemeat! Please transport a piece of mincemeat pie to me asap. :)


B.T. Evilpants profile image

B.T. Evilpants 7 years ago from Hell, MI

I'll send it by way of the elective eel express. That reminds me, I've seen eel pie once or twice, too.


Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty Inglish, MS 7 years ago from North America Author

Eel pie - I must say that I have enjoyed smoked eel (sorry elective eels - no relatives of yours, I hope - In fact, it was a different species - yeah that's it - - non-intelligent food eels, not really relatives at all...). But eel pie sounds intriguing.


RGraf profile image

RGraf 7 years ago from Wisconsin

Great hub! I have to admit that I cheat and buy the store bought crusts only because I don't have the time to make it from scratch. But from reading this, I think I'm going to start making time.

Thank you.


Shirley Anderson profile image

Shirley Anderson 7 years ago from Ontario, Canada

I can make a pie crust tough enough to break your teeth on. On occasion, it's been dry as sand. Yeah, I could eat pie for every meal, I love it, but not mine.

When that jackalope pie recipe comes out, I may give that a shot, though.

Great hub, as always, Patty!


B.T. Evilpants profile image

B.T. Evilpants 7 years ago from Hell, MI

Ahem...I heard that.


josephdiego profile image

josephdiego 7 years ago from Eastern Long Island , New York

Ok so it's the day after Thanksgiving, wishing you all had a wonderful holiday.

And just like the turkey, we will be eating leftover pie for the next few days. I just had some leftover apple-pie this morning....Oh well. Can't let it go to waste...

Nice Hub.. Thank you... JosephDiego


Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty Inglish, MS 7 years ago from North America Author

Thanks Joseph - I have enough food for a week, myself. :)


rmr profile image

rmr 7 years ago from Livonia, MI

I'm a glutton for gluttony. We'll be making a second turkey dinner on Sunday! Can't wait!


Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty Inglish, MS 7 years ago from North America Author

Food in every room of the house, I take it!


B.T. Evilpants profile image

B.T. Evilpants 7 years ago from Hell, MI

Actually, I ate the leftovers in the middle of the night. Sleepeating, you understand. I'm told that may be a symptom of a guilty conscience, but I don't buy into all that psychological mumbo-jumbo. rmr needs another turkey dinner, because he didn't get any of the first one.


Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty Inglish, MS 7 years ago from North America Author

Now, it's all logical.


Netters profile image

Netters 7 years ago from Land of Enchantment - NM

MmmmmThank you for the recipes. Great hub Patty!

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working