Quinoa - the superfood in the 21st century

Quinoa tabbouleh
Quinoa tabbouleh | Source
Chenopodium quinoa plant from the Andes Mountains.
Chenopodium quinoa plant from the Andes Mountains. | Source
Cheopodium quinoa grown in Bolivia by the shores of Lake Titicaca
Cheopodium quinoa grown in Bolivia by the shores of Lake Titicaca | Source

The 'new' superfood of the 21st century, quinoa (pronounced keen-wa) has recently been rediscovered as a nutrient rich, gluten free seed, not a grain, that can be cooked the same way as rice and can be used in a wide range and variety of dishes.

Quinoa is a seed which is prepared and eaten similarily to a grain. Quinoa is a non-GMO, glueten free and is usually grown organically.

I only recently discovered quinoa myself, although it has been around and popular for several years. I enjoy the nutty taste of this seed and I have substituted quinoa for the use of rice in several meals and dishes.

It originally was found grown in the Andean Mountains of South America, specifically in the countries of Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador and Colombia. It has been around since approximately 3000 BC and was an everyday staple of the Inca people's diet who resided in the west coast of South America in the 15th and 16th centuries. Today, it is still grown high in the Andes Mountains in the cool, thin air and dry soil. The majority of the quinoa sold and eaten today is still cultivated and harvested in the Andes Mountains.

The name quinoa comes from the Quecha language of the Incas and is a species of goosefoot. Chenopodium, a grain crop grown primarily for its edible seeds. It is not a member of the true grass family and is considered a pseudocereal rather than a true cereal. It is closely related to the families of beetroots, spinach and tumbleweeds.

Its nutritional value cannot be surpassed as it is high in protein, gluten-free and its nutrient make-up is favorable compared with common cereals. Quinoa seeds contain essential amino acids like lysine and quantities of calcium phosphorus and iron. The entire plant is edible as the leaves can be eaten as a leafy vegetable and the stalks can be eaten also.

After harvest, the seeds must be processed to removed the coating containing the bitter tasting saponins. The seeds are then cooked the same way as rice and, therefore, can be used in a wide range of dishes. It has been an important staple in Andean cultures and has today now become a staple in diets internationally

Quinoa has a nutty, rice taste and is now used in a variety of dishes such as cereals, salads, main dishes and desserts. There is no end to how quinoa can be used in recipes.

Red, white, and black quinoa seeds are the most popular grown, harvested and eaten today.
Red, white, and black quinoa seeds are the most popular grown, harvested and eaten today. | Source
Quinoa with roasted corn, black beans and crab salad.
Quinoa with roasted corn, black beans and crab salad. | Source
Gluten free quinoa waffles.
Gluten free quinoa waffles. | Source

Quinoa History

The quinoa plant is indigenous to the Andes Mountains region of South America but has been prettyh much obscure in the rest of the world. It became an important staple in the Andean cultures, specifically of the Inca people. The Incas believed the quinoa crop to be sacred and they referred to it as the "mother of all grains," even though it is a seed.

Maize (corn) and quinoa became the two mainstay foods of the Inca empire which began around 1200 AD. It was a food that could survive in a wide variety of growing conditions.

Chenopodium quinoa is believed to have been domesticated in the Peruvian Andes from the wild or weed plants of the same species.

Traditionally, the Inca emperor would sow the first steeds of the season as it had status within the indigenous ceremonies of the Incas and those living in the Andes. However, when the Spanish conquered the Incas, they scorned quinoa as "food for indians," and not worthy for the Spanish colonists to eat.

The Spanish suppressed quinoa's cultivation and even forbade its cultivation and forced the Incas to grow wheat instead.

As time moved on the seed has become popular in the U.S., Canada, Europe, Australia, China and Japan. Because it has become popular today, the crop value has increased substantially.

It is compatible with the soil and climate of the Andean region and was used over the years mostly as a peasant food that provided farming families with important nutrients.

Today, quinoa has become an everyday food of urban Bolivia's middle class and is a luxury food in the Peruvian capital city of Lima.

In 2013, the United Nations General Assembly named the year as the International Year of Quinoa because of its increased popularity, cultivation and health benefits and in recognition of ancestral practices of the Andean people.

The United Nation's objective was to draw attention to its nutritional properties for present and future generations and especially how to live in harmony with nature.

Today, most of the quinoa consumed in the U.S. comes from South America, specifically Peru, the largest commercial producer of quinoa and Bolivia, the second larges producer of it. These two countries produced nearly 99% of the commercially grown quinoa in 2010. And, recently the U.S. has begun cultivating quinoa in the Colorado Rockies as the climate and soil are similar to that in the Andes Mountains.

The quinoa seed today is grown in coastal areas at more than 4,000 m (13,000 ft) in the Andes near the equator. The best growing conditions are in cool climates with temperatures that vary between 25 degrees F (-4 degrees C) during the night and near 95 degrees F (35 degrees C) during the day. Light frosts do not affect the plant at any stage of development.

Growth is best with well-distributed rainfall during early growth of the seed and development of dry conditions during the seed's maturation and harvesting. Since 1982, the U.S.has grown quinoa primarily in the high elevation of the the Colorado Rockies.

The growing season in the U.S. is short in cultivating guinoa and is most like the maturity varieties typical of the Bolivian origin. Quinoa plants do best in sandy, well-drained soils with low nutrient content, moderate salinity and has a soil pH of 6 to 8.5.

Quinoa with black beans and corn.
Quinoa with black beans and corn. | Source

Nutritional value of quinoa

The quinoa seed has been called a superfood in the 21st century because of its nutrients. The protein content of quinoa per 100 calories is higher than brown rice, potatoes, barley and millet. The seed is a good source of dietary fiber and phosphorus and is high in magnesium and iron and is also a good source of calcium.

Quinoa is high in fiber, usually 10-16 grams of fiber per 100 grams. This helps to reduce blood sugar levels, cholesterol levels and weigh loss.

It is also a good food for vegans and for anyone who suffers from lactose intolerance. It is gluten free and easy to digest. Quinoa is non-GMO and is usually grown organically. Quinoa includes molecules called flavonoids (plant anti-oxidents). Its two flavonoids are quercetin and kaempferal which contain anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, anti-cancer and anti-depression effects.

Quinoa is also high in protein compared to most plant foods and contains all the essential amino acids that we need in our diet.

Quinoa monster cookies.
Quinoa monster cookies. | Source

Benefits of quinoa

There are many benefits to adding quinoa to our diets. Its anti-oxident properties are greater than those in cranberries, blueberries or ligonberries. When eaten on a daily basis, quinoa helps to decrease the risk of inflammation-related problems and diseases. The anti-inflammatory nutrients help to protect human blood vessels from inflammatory damage.

It also provides valuable amounts of heart-healthy fats like monosaturated fat. It also provides small amounts of the omega-3 fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid. And, the most important health benefit of quinoa is its overall nutrient richness.

Another benefit is to type 2 diabetes as it has a strong intake of protein and fiber which are two dietary essentials for regulation of blood sugar. The anti-inflammatory nutrients found in quinoa also makes it a great benefit for diabetes risk reduction.

Adding quinoa to our diet will lower total cholesterol and helps maintain levels of HDL, the good cholesterol.

The anti-oxident and anti-inflammatory phytonutrients also make it an anti-cancer benefit. It is excellent for the digestive track as it aids in digesting food and, therefore, is also an anti-colon cancer property.

It also benefits in reducing allergies and adverse reactions caused by certain other grains. It is a good substitute for wheat and because it is gluten free, it is a great substitute for any gluten-containing grain.

Uncooked and cooked quinoa.
Uncooked and cooked quinoa. | Source

Cooking quinoa

Cooking quinoa is easy and takes about fifteen to twenty minutes to make:

  • Put 2 cups of water in a saucepan or pot
  • Add 1 cup of raw quinoa and add a dash of salt and cover
  • Boil for 15-20 minutes or until all water is absorbed
  • Remove from heat and let stand of 5 minutes covered
  • Fluff with a fork and eat.

Cooked quinoa seeds are fluffy and creamy and also slightly crunchy and have an amazing translucent appearance. The seeds' flavor is delicate and somewhat nutty.

Quinoa can be bought pre-packaged as well in bulk from bins. If bought in bulk, quinoa should be stored in an airtight container and it will keep three to six months if stored in the fridge. To cook, always add one part quinoa to two parts liquid.

Fruit and nuts can be added to cooked quinoa and served as a breakfast porridge. Homemade noodles can be made from ground quinoa. Sprouted quinoa can be used in salads and sandwhiches similar to alfalfa sprouts.

Quinoa can be added to our favorite vegetable soups. Ground quinoa flour can be added to cookie and muffin recipes. And, it is great to use in tabboulah, a Middle Eastern dish.

Below are two recipes using quinoa as its base.

Blueberry Lemon Breakfast Quinoa
Blueberry Lemon Breakfast Quinoa | Source

Blueberry Lemon Breakfast Quinoa

Ingredients:


1 cup quinoa

2 cup nonfat milk

1 pinch of salt

3 tsp. maple syrup

1/2 lemon zested

1 cup blueberries

2 tsp. flax seed


Directions:

  1. Rinse quinoa in a fine strainer with cold water to removed bitterness until water runs clear and is no longer frothy.
  2. Heat milk in a saucepan over medium heat until warm, about 2-3 minutes. Stir quinoa and salt into milk; simmer over medium-low heat until much of the liquid has been absorbed, about 20 minutes. Remove saucepan from heat. Stir in maple syrup and lemon zest into the quinoa mixture. Gently fold blueberries into the mixture.
  3. Divide quinoa mixture between two bowls; top each with 1 tsp. flax seed to serve

Prep - 5 minutes Cook - 25 minutes Ready - in 30 minutes

Quinoa with Veggies
Quinoa with Veggies | Source

Quinoa with Veggies

Ingredients:


1 cup quinoa

3 cups water

1 pinch salt

3 tbsp. olive oil

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 red bell pepper, chopped

1/2 cup corn kernels

1/2 tsp. cumin

1 tsp. dried oregano

salt and pepper to taste

2 green onions, chopped


Directions:

  1. Bring quinoa, water and pinch of salt to a boil in a saucepan. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until the quinoa is tender, about 20 minutes. Once done, drain in a mesh strainer and set aside.
  2. Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Stir in the garlic and cook until the garlic softens and the aroma mellows, about 2 minutes. Add the red pepper and corn; continue cooking until the pepper softens, about 5 minutes. Season with cumin, oregano, salt and pepper and cook for 1 minute more, then stir in the cooked quinoa and green onions.
  3. Serve hot or cold.


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Comments 72 comments

billybuc profile image

billybuc 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

Great information about something I have never heard of. You can bet that once I tell Bev about it, we will be trying it. :) Thanks, Suzette.


marcoujor profile image

marcoujor 2 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

I have also only recently discovered this quinoa and loved it as much as any grain, or should I say seed...!!

...to the point that I have obviously been "butchering" the pronunciation...(LOL), so thank you ever so much for this information - rich in detail, informative in benefits, helpful with delicious recipes we can try to beautiful photography as well... all around excellent, as usual from you, dear friend!

Voted UP and UABI and sharing...Love and hugs, Maria


Brigitte Thompson profile image

Brigitte Thompson 2 years ago from Austin, TX

Thanks for this hub.. will be looking to add this to my diet, maybe this will help with my joint pain???


Vellur profile image

Vellur 2 years ago from Dubai

Interesting and informative hub about quinoa, delicious recipes. Voted up.


ocfireflies profile image

ocfireflies 2 years ago from North Carolina

Suzette,

I love that this super food is pronounced "keen-wa." Smiles. I have been hearing about it, but I have yet to try it. Great hub as always. Shared everywhere.

Kim


AudreyHowitt profile image

AudreyHowitt 2 years ago from California

I too love quinoa--try it with kale--it is wonderful that way! Smiles to you and Happy Wednesday!


Carb Diva profile image

Carb Diva 2 years ago

What a great, informative hub. We have recently discovered quinoa and love it. I have a question--I have been told that because of the way it is processed it is important to rinse quinoa before cooking. I didn't notice that step in your instructions. What is your experience with that? Voted up--thanks for sharing.


rasta1 profile image

rasta1 2 years ago from Jamaica

Just did an article in regards to qiunoa being a source of complete protein for vegans. I guess we are on the same wavelength.


mckbirdbks profile image

mckbirdbks 2 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

I have actually been pointed in the direction of quinoa for an improved diet. Although my youngest clearly knew I was not keen on change to a diet that has done me wo much harm. LOL ugh.

Thanks for the valuable reminder.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

Bill: I think you and Bev would like quinoa. I substitute quinoa for any rice dish. It is great in Spqnish rice and rice pilaf. Toy can even cook them together- half rice and half quinoa. I usually enhance the taste with either basil, rosemary, oregano or bay leaf. Eaten on a revulAr basis, it really helps the body. I am so glad you read this and discovered quinoa.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

Thanks so much forreading and for the share, mar.. I am so glad you enjoyed this. I too murdered the pronunciation until I bought a box of it and it had the correct pronunciation. It is such a versatile seed and can be substituted for any rice dish and in he morning it is great instead of oatmeal. Thank goodness we are getting back to healthier foods.


MizBejabbers profile image

MizBejabbers 2 years ago

This is an informative article on quinoa. I thought it was a middle-Eastern food because most things I read said it had been around since “Biblical times” and didn’t explain where it originated. I buy the white, but I see I’m going to have to try the colored varieties. Your photos look delicious, and I really want to try the blueberry lemon breakfast cereal, made with almond milk, of course. I have a wheat sensitivity, so I’m gluten-free. I’m glad to know that it works as a dairy substitute because I’m not only lactose intolerant, but actually allergic to dairy products. I wonder if they will make a milk out of quinoa like they do soy, oats, and various nuts. Voted up++


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 2 years ago from England

Hi suzette, how fascinating! I have never heard of Quinoa, or Keenwa, this sounds like my sort of food, amazing to think that it was only a small population of people who grew it in the Andes, great hub and really interesting!


bethperry profile image

bethperry 2 years ago from Tennesee

Great and informative article. I have had quinoa one time and enjoyed it very much. I am glad to find out what more can be done with this delicious food, and also the history!


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

Brigitte: So glad you found this hub helpful. Yes, if you eat it on a regular basis then it will help with joint pain and inflammation. I would certainly give it a try. I have joint inflammation quite often and every little thing helps. Thanks so much for your visit.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

Vellur: Thank you so much for your visit and I am glad you found this hub helpful. Quinoa is quite good and a great healthy substitute for rice.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

Hi Kim: So good of you to read this. Yes, the pronunciation is different because it is from the Quechua language and not the Spanish language. I pronounced it wrong for a long time until I finally bought some pre-packaged. The box backside explained how to pronounce it. It was pleasantly surprised myself. I really like it because of the 'nutty' taste. I substitute it for rice dishes all the time. I am so glad you enjoyed reading this and found it helpful.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

Hi Audrey: Thank you so much for your suggestion. I will try it with kale. In fact, kale is the next healthy food I need to start eating. Smiles to you too, Audrey and I hope you had a great day.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

Carb: I buy quinoa pre-packaged and the outer bitter covering is not on the seed. If you buy it in bulk, it may come with the bitter outer shell. If it does, then you need to soak the bitter outer shell off the seed. I only by it already boxed or packaged so I don't have to do the soaking step. That is why it is so easy to substitute for rice and/or oatmeal etc. In fact, I like it better than brown rice, now.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

rasta1: Yes, it is great for vegans to eat. I love it - I have been eating it with fish as I am not a vegan or vegetarian, but it certainly is a great source of protein. I am so glad you have discovered this also. Thanks for your visit.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

Mike: don't you like quinoa? Is it too much of a change for you? When prepared it is good to add spices to enhance the nutty flavor of the quinoa. I use basil, rosemary, oregano or bay leaf to give it a better taste than just plain. Try that with your quinoa and you might like it better. It is so healthy that we should eat this. I love it for the anti-inflammatory properties, but I have to eat it nearly everyday for it to help the joints. LOL!


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

MizBejabbers: I just heard about quinoa about two years ago and I started seeing it on my grocery store shelves then. I have finally gotten around to eating it and I love it. It comes in many colors, pink, purple, and orange also as well as white, red and black. I have only eaten the white as I buy it pre-packaged and not in bulk. I think the blueberry lemon breakfast cereal is great - I eat it without the maple syrup because I don't want so much of a sugar content. Cooking it with almond milk sounds delicious and great to me. Your question is a good one - I don't know and did not run across it being made into a milk in my research. It is a dry seed, so I don't know if that can be done or not. Thanks so much for your visit and for reading this and I am glad this is helpful for your allergy symptoms.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

Hi Nell: I am surprised you have not heard of this. I noticed it showing up on my grocery store shelves about two years ago. I had read a couple of articles about it and just recently got around to trying it. I buy it pre-packaged and not from bins. I knew it was coming from the Andes Mountains, so I gave quinoa a Spanish pronunciation and did not know it was pronounced 'keenwa' until I bought a box and the correct pronunciation was given on the box. I am so glad you found this interesting, Nell. If you have it in the UK, try it sometime.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

beth: Thanks so much for stopping by to read this. I am glad you found it helpful. Yes, quinoa is such a versatile seed and can be cooked in many ways, added to many foods, and eaten for breakfast, lunch and dinner. I usually substitute quinoa for when I would serve rice. But, it makes great salads that really are healthy.


Sunshine625 profile image

Sunshine625 2 years ago from Orlando, FL

Excellent tribute to quinoa! My daughter turned me on to it a few months ago...she prepares it as a side dish and it's delish! :)


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

Hi Sunshine: Thanks so much for stopping by to read this. Yes, I just started cooking it and eating it recently. I use it as a side dish also, usually in place of when I would serve rice. So glad you like it too.


sweetpikez profile image

sweetpikez 2 years ago

I just heard about this seed. I think this can be a meat substitute as well since it contains high protein. Kids and kids at heart will surely love this. Thanks for the information you have provided in this article. Thumbs up!


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

sweetpikez: you are right, it can be a meat substitute and that is why it is so good and popular with vegans and vegetarians. It does have a lot of protein in it as well as other health benefits. Thanks so much for your visit.


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 2 years ago from southern USA

Hi Suzzette,

I have not heard of this yet, but I sure am going to start making it a part of my diet! What a fantastic hub here full of great information.

The recipes sound great and I will be trying them.

Up +++ tweeting, pinning, G+ and sharing

Blessings always


RTalloni profile image

RTalloni 2 years ago from the short journey

We've been using quinoa long enough now that it is a regular part of our diet. Thanks much for the info and recipes to encourage using it in a variety of ways. I've been meaning to explore other ways to use it, but including it in soups it so easy… :)


ChitrangadaSharan profile image

ChitrangadaSharan 2 years ago from New Delhi, India

Very nice hub about a super food called Quinoa. I have not heard about it but your description resembles somewhat like Sabudana, available in India.

I will be trying your recipes with that.

The pictures are amazing and the information quite helpful.

Thanks for sharing!


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 2 years ago from Dallas, Texas

I've seen this in stores and wondered how to cook it and what the nutritional properties were. Thanks for sharing that information and the variety of ways this can be served.


North Wind profile image

North Wind 2 years ago from The World (for now)

I have heard people go on about this and I have seen it in stores but I have always been weary to try it. I do not know but it looks like it might taste a little like brown rice and I hate brown rice. It looks quite appealing in the pictures so I am always torn about trying it. I did not realize that there were so many ways to prepare it.


Jackie Lynnley 2 years ago

I knew it had great benefit from an article a friend of mine wrote a couple years ago but I just have been adding a handful to my lentils and barley I eat to prevent sugar. Now I see it can be quite good. Thanks for the delicious looking recipes. I will surely try them.


Ericdierker profile image

Ericdierker 2 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

This hub is chuck full of great ingredients from history, to nutrients to recipes, fantastic job. We will be adding more to our diet. Thanks


heidithorne profile image

heidithorne 2 years ago from Chicago Area

We've been eating quinoa more often and love it! Trying to find more ways to integrate it since we're trying to reduce meat consumption, too. Excellent hub! Voted up, useful, interesting and sharing!


Genna East profile image

Genna East 2 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

I liked the fact that this food is gluten free and is usually grown organically. Its “protein content of per 100 calories is higher than brown rice, potatoes, barley and millet.” Wow! And it looks delicious. I am sold, and will look for this super food. Thank you, Suzette!


The Examiner-1 profile image

The Examiner-1 2 years ago

Brilliant food Suzette, it is good that you wrote this to let us know about it. I might just try this in my salad or vegetables at lunch. Can we buy it at supermarkets? I voted up, shared and pinned it.

Kevin


teaches12345 profile image

teaches12345 2 years ago

My favorite quinoa dish is served at a local restaurant and it has so much flavor. The nutrients are tremendous and it's so great for the body's need of fiber, as you mention here. Thanks for the recipe suggestions.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

Faith: I had noticed it on grocery store shelves and read a few articles about quinoa. I decided to try it one day, and I loved it. It has a nutty taste which I find so tasty. I substitute it for any rice dish I prepare. It is even healthier than brown rice. I am so pleased you enjoyed reading this and have found a new food to try. Thanks so much for your interest and comments.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

RTalloni: I am so pleased you enjoyed reading this. It is good to hear it is part of your regular diet. The recipes I think are yummy and the neat thing about quinoa is it is so versatile and there is so much you can do with this seed. Using it in soups sounds like a great idea to me - it would be like barley/lentiles and certainly remain with the healthy benefits. Thanks so much for your comments.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

Hi Chitrangada: I am interested to hear this is like Sabudana from India. I have never heard of Sabudana, and it sounds healthy too. I will have to look into this too. I am so pleased you are interested in quinoa and the recipes. I hope it has found its way to India also.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

Peg: I had heard and seen it in the grocery stores for the past several years, but I just recently tried it out. I found it very tasty and it does have a nutty flavor to it. I am so glad you find this food interesting also. What I like about it is that there are such a variety of ways to cook and serve it. Thanks again for your interest.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

North Wind: I have to admit it is similar to brown rice and if you don't like brown rice, you might not like quinoa. Quinoa has a different taste than brown rice, though, because of its nutty flavor, so you might like it. It is such a versatile food that can be used in so many recipes and this is why I like it along with all the health benefits. That it is gluten-free is a big plus for me. Thanks so much for your interest and for your comments.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

Jackie: Thanks so much for your interest. I think substituting quinoa in soups is a great idea as RTalloni says. The best part of quinoa for me is that it is gluten-free, but barley and lentils are just as good also. I like quinoa because of its versatility in its substitution in so many recipes. Thanks so much for your visit and comments.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

Thank you Eric and I am pleased you enjoyed reading this.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

heidithorne: Thanks so much for your interest and for reading this. I, too, find quinoa so versatile to use in our diets. I think it is great for vegans and vegetarians as it offers so much protein. The best part of it for me is that it is gluten-free.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

Genna: Thank you so much for your interest and comments. I am pleased that you enjoyed this. Well, quinoa has gone mainstream and now you can most likely find this in the rice aisle of your local grocery store. More and more people are discovering the health benefits of this seed and are making it a part of their diet and it is a great substitute for rice. Thanks again for your visit.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

Hi Kevin: This is an amazing food with so many health benefits. This food has gone mainstream, so you should find it in the rice aisle of your local supermarket. If not, it will definitely be in the organic section. I buy it in the rice aisle of my local supermarket. I think you will like it both in salad and mixed with veggies. I like it for its gluten-free properties. Thanks so much for your interest and comments. I hope you try and enjoy quinoa.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

Dianna: That is so interesting to find it in a local restaurant. I have not noticed it being served in restaurants yet, so I am pleased to hear you have found it there. Thanks so much for your interest and comments.


The Examiner-1 profile image

The Examiner-1 2 years ago

Thank you very much for your help Suzette. I will look for it the next time I go. :-)

Kevin


quildon profile image

quildon 2 years ago from Florida

Really great hub, Suzette. I discovered quinoa last year, but I've never had much of it. Your information and recipes make me want to try it since I am a vegetarian. Voted up and useful.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

You are welcome, Kevin and I hope you enjoy cooking and eating quinoa.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

quildon: If you are a vegetarian, this is the food for you! There is so much protein in quinoa that it is a great substitute for meat. It also is gluten-free which I find wonderful also. I hope your enjoy it and thanks for the votes.


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

This is new to me, but I love trying new foods, especially the healthy ones. Thank you for this exceptional hub.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

Hi Jo: This is becoming more and more popular in the U.S. It is mainstreamed now in the rice aisle of our grocery stores. I found it delicious because of the nutty taste to it. Hope you try it and I hope you like it as much as I do.


anglnwu profile image

anglnwu 2 years ago

Your hub is full of useful and interesting information. Thumbs up!! I do eat quinoa from time to time but you've given me numerous ideas on how to make it more interesting. Got to try them. Thanks for sharing.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

anglnwu: Thank you so much for reading and for your interest. Quinoa is such a versatile food and with such health benefits. I am pleased you enjoyed this and are enjoying quinoa in your diet.


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vocalcoach 2 years ago from Nashville Tn.

A stellar, informative and beautiful hub about Quinoa. Being a vegetarian I am scouting for new foods filled with protein. Will pick this up tomorrow at my health food store. Eager to try it.

Voted up, useful, awesome, beautiful and interesting. Pinning to my board and sharing.


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suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

Thank you vocal coach. I am so glad you enjoyed reading this. Yes, quinoa is full of protein and a good substitute for meat. It is also gluten-free which is another plus. Thanks for your comments and for your visit. Much appreciated.


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ladyguitarpicker 2 years ago from 3460NW 50 St Bell, Fl32619

Will definitely try this as I need to lower cholesterol and am pre diabetic. I have changed most of my eating habits and will try this along with all my new food. Great information. Thanks Stella


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suzettenaples 2 years ago from Taos, NM Author

Stella: So glad you enjoyed reading this and found it helpful. I just started eating quinoa recently and I can't say enough about how good it tastes and how good it is for our health. It is an interesting seed and there is so much you can do with it for any meal of the day. Thanks so much for your interesting and stopping by to read this.


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tobusiness 22 months ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

I had to take another look at this excellent hub, as I'm hoping to find the healthy quinoa in the supermarket and could not remember the name. Voted up and sharing.


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suzettenaples 22 months ago from Taos, NM Author

Hi Jo: So glad you have enjoyed this a second time. We have it here in our grocery stores so I hope it is in British grocery stores also. I just had some the other day and I love it.


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phdast7 20 months ago from Atlanta, Georgia

Just recently started experimenting with Quinoa and I like it. Thanks for an interesting and informative article. Hope all is well with you. Theresa Sharing.


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poetryman6969 19 months ago

We ate quinoa even before we knew how to pronounce it. If any of these recipes tastes good I would consider that a fabulous find.

Voted up.


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JayeWisdom 19 months ago from Deep South, USA

As someone whose diet is mainly plant-based and who is also sensitive to gluten, I know the benefits of quinoa. Unfortunately, I've tried cooking it a number of ways and can manage to disguise the taste (or, non-taste) with other ingredients, but nothing I do can disguise the texture that I can't stand. I like a lot of foods, but quinoa is (sadly) not one of them. I can't force myself to eat the stuff.


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suzettenaples 19 months ago from Taos, NM Author

Thank you Theresa. Everything is fine here. I am so glad you have tried quinoa and like it.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 19 months ago from Taos, NM Author

poetryman: So glad you eat quinoa and enjoy it. The recipes I have included I like very much. Hope you an enjoy them also.


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 19 months ago from Taos, NM Author

Jaye, I'm so sorry to hear quinoa doesn't agree with you. My only suggestion is try mixing it with brown rice - I do that sometimes and I love it.


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 7 months ago from South Africa

The quinoa dish looks delicious. I wonder if it is available down here?


suzettenaples profile image

suzettenaples 7 months ago from Taos, NM Author

I would think so. It is eaten world wide. Thanks for reading and I am glad you enjoyed it.

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