Simple Family Connections

Occasionally, thoughts will carry us back to joyful times with our grandparents. They are a families blessing and the backbone of its very structure. I feel sorry for those individuals whose lives did not include grandparents.

Children and grandchildren enjoy hearing stories about their ancestor’s lives and adventures. My great-grandparents (maternal side) homesteaded in the tiny town of Rosita, CO and there produced nine children. In that brood of nine, my grandmother held the distinction of being a twin; the other part of that twin set was a boy.

My great-grandfather worked the mines to support his family and my great- grandmother opened the first restaurant and boarding house in Westcliffe, CO (a few miles from Rosita). Her eatery quickly gained the reputation as the “best fixins around”.

After my mother passed away, I found my great-grandmothers cookbook among her possessions. I was as excited as a kid with a new toy. The backing is literally held in place by duck tape. However, the generations of recipes are still readable on pages yellowed and worn with time and use. This unique family connection continues to bridge the span of time.

So, from this precious resource, I am going to share one of my favorite childhood treats with you.

                                       CRULLERS

¼ cup shortening                                           4 teaspoons baking powder

1 cup sugar                                                    ½ teaspoon salt

3 eggs                                                            ½ teaspoon nutmeg

1 cup of milk                                                   ¼ teaspoon of allspice

About 4½ cups of flour                                   ½ teaspoon of vanilla

Cream shortening and add sugar gradually. Add well-beaten eggs and the milk. With three cups of the flour mix baking powder, salt and spices, and add to first mixture. Add vanilla and enough more flour to make a dough that can be handled. Roll to about a quarter of an inch in thickness, cut in half-inch strips and twist to form figure eights, or cut with an ordinary doughnut cutter. Fry in deep fat. Roll in granulated sugar.

Time in cooking, 3 minutes each. Temperature, 370º. Yields 3 dozen crullers.

Comments 23 comments

Nancy's Niche profile image

Nancy's Niche 6 years ago from USA Author

Thanks Journey for your comment and yes, that book is a treasure...We frequently, and very carefully, select old recipes to try...Blessings!!!


Journey * profile image

Journey * 6 years ago from USA

The book must be a true treasure to you. Keep it safe and thanks for generously sharing this recipe!


Nancy's Niche profile image

Nancy's Niche 6 years ago from USA Author

emather, thanks for the comment and visiting my site. Try this recipe, I bet you'll like it---an easy and tasty treat...


emather 6 years ago from United Arab Emirates

Your lucky.

I wish I had something like that. Even tough I'm not a cooker, I would certainly try the recipes.

Nice sharing.


Nancy's Niche profile image

Nancy's Niche 6 years ago from USA Author

Thanks for the comment Tony...Growing up in an Welsh/English household, we enjoyed this treat and it brings back happy memories....


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa

This sounds so like what we in South Africa call "koeksisters" - see my Hub on Cape Town http://hubpages.com/travel/Historical-buildings-in...

We usuall use ordinary white bread dough for these and dip them into very hot sweet syrup as soon as they come our of the hot oil.

Even the name "crullers" is similar to the Afrikaans word for something that curls or is twisted. I guess that's where the German and Dutch connection that Misty found in Wikipedia comes in. Fascinating.

Love and peace

Tony


Nancy's Niche profile image

Nancy's Niche 7 years ago from USA Author

Yes, it is quite priceless...Thanks for your comment!


Lady_E profile image

Lady_E 7 years ago from London, UK

The book is a priceless gift.

I will try out the recipe sometime. Cheers :)


Nancy's Niche profile image

Nancy's Niche 7 years ago from USA Author

Delores, your right, it is a treasure along with an antique Singer Sewing machine my mother left me---the very one that she and my grandmother used to make my school clothes.


Dolores Monet profile image

Dolores Monet 7 years ago from East Coast, United States

What a great thing to have, your great grandmother's cookbook. I'm sure it is a treasure to you! And I haven't heard the word cruller for quite some time! You could put together some great hubs with those old recipes.


Nancy's Niche profile image

Nancy's Niche 7 years ago from USA Author

LondonGirl,

Thanks for taking time to research the info on Crullers. Now I know it is truly a multicultural treat since Wikipedia, mentioned part of my linage (Welsh, Dutch, & German). The recipe does state, “cut in half-inch strips and twist to form figure eights, or cut with an ordinary doughnut cutter.” Because this was our favorite treat, (and more is always better), the recipe was made into doughnuts…


LondonGirl profile image

LondonGirl 7 years ago from London

I looked it up on wikipedia, which may or may not be right:

A traditional cruller (or twister) is a twisted, oblong, fried pastry made of dough somewhat like that of a cake doughnut, often topped with plain powdered sugar; powdered sugar mixed with cinnamon; or icing.

The name can also refer to the French cruller, a fluted, ring-shaped doughnut made from choux pastry with a light airy texture.

The name comes from early 19th century Dutch kruller, from krullen "to curl". Crullers are traditionally eaten in Germany and some other European countries on Shrove Tuesday, to use up fat before Lent.

Crullers are most commonly found in Canada, New England and the Mid-Atlantic and North Central states of the USA, but it is also common in California.


LondonGirl profile image

LondonGirl 7 years ago from London

I looked it up on wikipedia, which may or may not be right:

A traditional cruller (or twister) is a twisted, oblong, fried pastry made of dough somewhat like that of a cake doughnut, often topped with plain powdered sugar; powdered sugar mixed with cinnamon; or icing.

The name can also refer to the French cruller, a fluted, ring-shaped doughnut made from choux pastry with a light airy texture.

The name comes from early 19th century Dutch kruller, from krullen "to curl". Crullers are traditionally eaten in Germany and some other European countries on Shrove Tuesday, to use up fat before Lent.

Crullers are most commonly found in Canada, New England and the Mid-Atlantic and North Central states of the USA, but it is also common in California.


Nancy's Niche profile image

Nancy's Niche 7 years ago from USA Author

I wrote the cruller recipe directly from my great-grandmothers cookbook and it only says Crullers. I have no doubt that the term English came from the American side. Ethnic credits, I just love it.

 


LondonGirl profile image

LondonGirl 7 years ago from London

googling it, there are a very few results, and seem to be American.


Nancy's Niche profile image

Nancy's Niche 7 years ago from USA Author

Might be a blended mix of American and Welsh? :-)


LondonGirl profile image

LondonGirl 7 years ago from London

must be a local-specfic term - not heard it from my Welsh rellies.


Nancy's Niche profile image

Nancy's Niche 7 years ago from USA Author

A doughnut and I do believe my Welsh grate-grandmother dubbed them “English Crullers” because that’s all I ever heard them called growing up...Good to hear from you; hope all is well with you and yours...


LondonGirl profile image

LondonGirl 7 years ago from London

“English Crullers” never heard of them (-: What are they?


Nancy's Niche profile image

Nancy's Niche 7 years ago from USA Author

Mulberry1

Crullers were always my favorite treat too. My great-grandmothers cookbook is a treasure and I was thrilled to find her cruller recipe.  


mulberry1 profile image

mulberry1 7 years ago

My mother still has a cookbook her mother gave to her nearly 60 years ago. Some of the recipes from that book are ones I had throughout my childhood. Of taken a number of the cookie and pie recipes from it. I love Cruellers, I hope to try your recipe in the coming weeks!


Nancy's Niche profile image

Nancy's Niche 7 years ago from USA Author

LondonGirl,

I have found census records, old pictures, and this cookbook. Of course, my Welsh Granny use to call this recipe “English Crullers” and they were delicious! Its fun to trace your heritage and finding items like cookbooks and certificates for an apprentice is exciting. It is part of you, your linage and memories.


LondonGirl profile image

LondonGirl 7 years ago from London

The odd thing passed down in this way is fascinating - my Dad has his grandfather's certificate from when he was apprenticed to a carpenter in 1879, and his army paybook.

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