Recipe for Smoked Salmon and Caviar bruschetta, served on homemade Ciabatta.

tummy rumbling good
tummy rumbling good | Source
Bradford, with Lister's mill.
Bradford, with Lister's mill.

Home Kitchen


Hi, welcome to my kitchen. If you have not visited before you might find my recipes are a different format to others. I like to tell you little bit about everything that’s going on around the kitchen, as well as keep you amused. The chap who keeps me amused is an Italian friend called Fabio, who seems to think his only purpose in life is to eat me out of house and home.

This hub is dedicated to Derdriu.

Derdriu asked me if I could do a hub about bruschette with a salmon topping. Being a gentleman and a Yorkshireman how could I refuse?

The picture is of Bradford West Yorkshire, beyond the numerous terrace houses is Lister's mill. The mill was one of the many woollen mills that Bradford's wealth was built on. The huge chimney can be seen from all over the city, and legend has it that the chimney is so big that a team of horses could be driven around the top of it. It was closed as a textile mill in the 1960s, it has now been converted into smart apartments.

Comune di Castellina in Chianti
Comune di Castellina in Chianti | Source
Yorkshire Terrier
Yorkshire Terrier

Smoked Salmon


Fabio brought some smoked salmon and I baked a ciabatta style bread. I don’t use yeast in my ciabattas, see my hub on friendship and sponge breads for my recipe.

So we were ready to go. Fabio is from Tuscany originally, his family moved here to Yorkshire in the 50’s. My dad served in the 8th army during the war in Italy and was pretty fluent in Italian, whilst he was there he made friends with Fabio’s father and mother. So when they wanted to leave Italy they contacted my dad, came to Yorkshire, and opened a restaurant.

My Dad in Italy 1945

Dad in his 8th army uniform
Dad in his 8th army uniform
big bubbles let the bread soak and hold the toppings better.
big bubbles let the bread soak and hold the toppings better. | Source

Home Made Bread


Let’s get on with the meal.

Long-ways slice the bread to provide a really nice platform for your toppings.

Now, here is the reason for using a sponge bread, it is quite simply the tastiest of breads, and as you cut it open to reveal the texture which is amazing; it provides an open bubbly platform for you to perform gastronomical miracles on.

Is your tummy already rumbling?

mayo, mustard, brie
mayo, mustard, brie | Source

Mustard, Mayonnaise and Garlic Paste



I mixed, mayonnaise with garlic paste and spread that generously on the bread.

Next I spread some English mustard on top again and mixed them slightly. If English mustard is a little hot for your taste, use a French style, or better still take some English mustard and add to it a little balsamic vinegar, a little mayo, stir them up and use instead.

Sprinkle with Dill, and then slice some soft cheese, I used brie, which I like, as it has a nice texture and not too strong a flavour.

You can place this under the grill now and just

Source

Celery Salt


Sprinkle with just a little celery salt; this will add more flavour and enhance the flavour of the cheese.

Red shallots, maybe three or four, it depends how many people you are serving. Slice them very thin and add to the bread. And now, the moment you have been waiting for…tra la!

Slices of pure Heaven

thin slices of pure heaven.
thin slices of pure heaven. | Source
Source


Add thin slices of smoked salmon, I’ve used some wild Scottish salmon.

[it said on the packet 'wild salmon' , and I suppose you would be too, if someone stuck a hook in your lip and dragged you into a boat.] you could chop this up a little bit, but I like it like this.

Brush with a little lemon juice and then sprinkle with a mixture of Basil, parsley, thyme.

Add English cucumber, and Italian style tomatoes. I grow and like a variety called Pomodoro Costoluto fiorentino, the fruit is quite heavy and it makes a great sandwich just on its own.

Pomodoro Costoluto fiorentino

Pomodoro Costoluto fiorentino
Pomodoro Costoluto fiorentino | Source


Now it’s time for the real flavour kick, add a heaped teaspoon of caviar. You don’t have to go to the expense of Russian Beluga, unless you’re James Bond of course, I use lump fish roe, but of course you can get many different varieties, including salmon.

Another squirt of lemon, another sprinkle of herbs on top finishes this off nicely.

Heaven is a Sandwich

Tell me something better
Tell me something better

something nice to listen to

The Florentine merchant Francesco di Marco Datini sold one of the earliest examples of Chianti wines and it was white, not red.
The Florentine merchant Francesco di Marco Datini sold one of the earliest examples of Chianti wines and it was white, not red.

What to Drink?


I served this with a few grapes, which add a little sweetness.

My sugestions to drink with this meal; I served a slightly chilled Chianti classico a wine that demonstrates the grace and finesse of the Sangiovese grape. Look for the black cock on the label, that ensures quality.

Also because Fabio brought his mum round and she loves to talk about her home in Tuscanny, so it seemed fitting, as it is the wine of the region.

You could serve a French chardonnay in particular a wine matured in oak which will have a soft flavour, and yet the chardonnay grape will still keep a little citrus/lemonony flavour. If you want a new world wine from such as New Zealand or Chile or California, again go for a chardonnay. Perhaps if you have a lot of friends round you might even go for a light ‘rosa’, well chilled, which is always fresh and fun to drink.

Presentation adds to the joy

Finished sandwich. Don't forget presentation makes a difference too.
Finished sandwich. Don't forget presentation makes a difference too. | Source

Tuscany Italy

king scallops
king scallops | Source

Scallops

I also gently fried a few scallops, kings with roe on in some butter and garlic, basil, salt and white pepper.I fine sliced some fresh fennel bulb and cooked it in the butter.

Scallops, need only a couple of minutes to cook, but to me they are the quintessential shellfish food. I have been known to serve them flambéed in brandy, but don’t tell anyone.

I served these on bread with a squeeze of lemon and lime, and a sprinkle herbs.

bread and butter pudding with a crunchy top of jam and breadcrumbs
bread and butter pudding with a crunchy top of jam and breadcrumbs | Source

And to finish...

We finished with a very English pudding, bread and butter pudding, topped with greengage jam.

Greengages are my favourite jam fruit, they are also called Reine Claudes which originally were bred in France, they are a member of the plum family.

Adventure on the high seas

5 stars from 3 ratings of Bruschetta topped with salmon and caviar

Ingredients

  • Bread [ciabatta], any suitable flatbread will work.
  • salmon, smoked salmon
  • tomatoes
  • garlic paste, to mix with the mayo
  • caviar, use your favourite fish roe

More by this Author


Comments 23 comments

rjsadowski profile image

rjsadowski 4 years ago

I love your comments and pictures. They add so much to the recipe.


LaThing profile image

LaThing 4 years ago from From a World Within, USA

Love salmon, love caviar (grew up with it!), and that picture of Bradford.... My, brings back memories. Been there only once as a little girl, but I still remember the Mill! Have to try this recipe, sounds scrumptious! Hope you will do the 'bread and butter pudding' next :)

Voting up and pinning!


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

rjsadowski,

many thanks for your visit and kind comment. I hope you try to enjoy this recipe.

cheers Tony


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

LaThing, many thanks for the comments and interest. Thank you for your memory too, interesting that the mill should stick in your memory.

There is a link on here to the bread and butter pudding, follow 'Use up left over bread'

thanks for the vote up and pin.

regards

Tony


LaThing profile image

LaThing 4 years ago from From a World Within, USA

Yes, I see it! I don't know how I missed it, I guess I was too busy eyeing the pudding! lol

Thanks....


Angie Jardine profile image

Angie Jardine 4 years ago from Cornwall, land of the eternally youthful mind ...

Hi Tony

I just have to have a go at this ... I am seriously impressed with your knowledge of Italian food. It is my favourite cuisine - it always seems to be so fresh and healthy and I am a terrible foodie.

I also adore tomatoes ... as I don't grow my own (yet) I go to the supermarket and stand there sniffing the packets for that wonderful 'green' smell they have when they are still on the vine. The staff think I'm bonkers of course ... but I know what I'm doing :)


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

LaThing,

I hope you try and enjoy the B&B pudding too. I'm about to add a new topping idea for that soon.

regards

Tony


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Angie,

thank you for the visit and comment.

I have a mental picture of you shiffing your way round the supermarket. If you really like that on the vine smell, when you cook something with your tomatoes, add the vine to the cookpot, you'll get a great flavour from it. You don't have to eat it by the way.

regards

Tony


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

cattleboyz

thanks for dropping in and your comment.

cheers

Tony


SidKemp profile image

SidKemp 4 years ago from Boca Raton, Florida (near Miami and Palm Beach)

Delicious presentation!


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Sidkemp

many thanks for dropping by and comment.

cheers

Tony


Derdriu 4 years ago

Tony, Thank you for dedicating to me such an amazingly, appealingly, attractively, awesomely belly-rumbling, finger-licking, lip-smacking, mouth-watering hub on your delectable, delicious, scrumptious, tasty, yummy smoked salmon and caviar bruschetta on homemade ciabatta!

In particular, I appreciate the cultural details which you always include in your food hubs (in this case, your father, his photo, and his role in turning a good Tuscan family into good Yorkshirepeople). Also, I like your conversational style which makes it easy to imagine the kitchen banter between you and Fabio as you all scale the culinary heights. Additionally, I like the explanations and options which you always introduce into your clear instructions. For example, English mustard toned down a bit with balsamic vinegar and mayo sounds wonderful.

Finally, I really appreciate the serving suggestions. The scallops, the grapes, and the bread and butter pudding with greengages jam sound perfect, as does the Chianti classico. But I also appreciate your additional, French, New World and New Zealand alternatives in the world of chardonnay.

Thank you, oh proper champion Yorkshireman, for sharing your culinary adventures as well as the original photos and the Mario Lanza video.

Voted up + all the votes.

Respectfully, Derdriu

P.S. Are Fabio and his family fluent in both Yorkshirese and Tuscanese?


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Derdriu, We did toast you as before we ate the meal, and several times during the meal.

Thank you for your in depth comments, thank you hilighting the things you liked about the hub too. This quality of feedback makes all the difference to producing good hubs. Knowing that the various sections have made an impact and that someone is aknowledging the work and effort that is necessary to produce something a little different. As you know there are hundreds of real good recipes out there, so I have looked for a way to be a bit different. I'm sure it will pay off.

Fabio's English is good, his Mum and Grandma's is okay a bit dodgey at times, thay tend to chat in Tuscanese. Do you have greengages over yonder?

Thank you for taking the time to comment, vote and be interested, my Celtic Queen. he says doffing his hat and touching his forelock.

oh by the way the peeper's legs are not forgotten, just a problem sourcing them. I rang a shop and said to the girl, 'do you have frogs legs?' 'Don't be cheeky,' she said.

so I'll hop off now.

regards

Tony


Derdriu 4 years ago

Tony, Thank you for the toastings throughout such a magnificently photogenic and undoubtedly tasty dinner.

If greengages' use can be traced back to the late 16th-early 17th century, then you can count on them being available somewhere in Virginia whose culture is the quintessential example of keeping traditions passed down from generation to generation. If not, then it still may be available in the far northern counties or in Charlottesville (C'ville) or Richmond.

It's possible that I may have had greengages in childhood since two of my paternal great grandparents were English (one of them the granddaughter of Yorkshire parents). It's also possible that greengages is something that Stessily had and loved from England and India.

Do you think you'll have to make a trip all the way from Yorkshire to France in order to get frogs legs? It's kind of ironic since I have tons of spring peepers just outside the back door and there's no way that I'm going to remove their cute little legs.

Respectfully, and with many thanks oh Proper Champion Yorkshireman, Derdriu


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Derdriu,

I have no idea what's available on your side of the pond. I admit that the only way I see over there is through films, TV shows, Hill street Blues, is how I imagine it to be, apart from the dusty desert bits that the cowboys ride about in.

Greengages came from France originally Moissac to be precise, and are part of the plum family. They are not common here, and it is because the lady I teach guitar has a large tree in her garden that I have a good supply for jam. Also Damsons, which are the most tasty fruit ever. People here are getting really lazy with their eating habits, and just buy from supermarkets, all the little shops have almost vanished.

I've just had a look at Wiki and it says that George Washington and Mr. Jefferson were fans of the fruit. Apparently they are grown in Washington.

Greengages are also called la bonne reine (French for "the good Queen") in France.

Just grab a couple of those little critters and stick them in the post!

They really are expensive, or rather the shipping is.

1kg is from about £20 and then shipping is £15.

I found a great Vietnamese fish supplier which does stock them, but they are in London>:{

You could do a hub about the various regions and what they grow.

I'll hop along again Oh Celtic Queen,

Go raibh míle maith do do chuid tuairimí agus am iontach Celtic Banríon.

proper champion ar lass

hop, hop, sizzle.;}

regards

Tony


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 4 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

Hi, Tony

Wow! I love bruschetta of many types but can honestly say I have never eaten such a wonderfully elaborate and impressive version. This would by no means be out of place on Her Majesty's table at a Diamond Jubilee banquet! Maybe we'll see your home smoked salmon in a Hub soon...???

Fabulous creation and - as usual - enjoyed the refreshingly different read as well :)

Gordon


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Hello Gordon,

thanks for calling in. Well you know how good smoked salmon is with anything, and I love caviar it just seemed like a good idea.

I'm still at the playing about stage with the smoker, so far I've done an amazing chicken dish and I've managed cheese and pork.

I'll need to print out your hub on smoking salmon before I try it.

DO think I should send a copy to HRH?

regards Tony


chili sauce sweet 4 years ago

Thank you for the information you provide. very nice website.

http://www.cattleboyz.com/


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

chili sauce sweet, thank you for your comment and visit.

regards Tony


marcoujor profile image

marcoujor 4 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

Oh Tony,

This song is a wonderful accompaniment for this appetizing hub...how romantic and charming, just as the perfect meal for two should be...

I love the passion you feel for your music and your food! The drink suggestions are lovely... 5-STARS all the way... voted UP & ABI.

Hugs, Maria


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Marie, thank you for your comments and votes. I think that the ambience of the setting makes the meal perfect, the wine, sounds, the smells even.

Thanks for the hug too today, I need it.

regards Tony


cold dawn 4 years ago

One of the best hubs I've seen on here, voted up.


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

cold dawn

many thanks for your kind words, and votes.

cheers Tony

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