South African Food ranges from Curry to Koeksisters

Following the success of the FIFA 2010 World Cup, many fans may have developed an appetite for the South African food as much as they enjoyed the football.  South African cuisine is as rich and diverse as the country’s natural landscape and its cultural heritage. Traditional ‘south African food is influenced by Dutch, English, Indian, Portuguese and Indeginous African culinary influences. Listed below are a few popular South African foods.

Koeksisters
Koeksisters | Source

Koeksisters


This Afrikaner treat is plaited dough that is fried then dipped in sugar syrup. The Malay version is then dipped into desiccated coconut. This makes for a great tea time treat.

Boerewors
Boerewors | Source

Boerewors


The word boere originated form the Dutch word boer meaning farmer. This traditional South African sausage. This is available in various flavours. Boere wors is also available dry

Braaivleis (Barbecued Meat)

Hot weather makes braai’s (barbecues) very popular in South Africa. Meat is marinated then cooked over fire.

Mutton Bunny Chow
Mutton Bunny Chow | Source

Bunny Chow

This Indian originated dish is bread stuffed with curry. Bunny Chow is available in four flavours, Chicken bunny, Beef Bunny, Lamb Bunny and beans bunny. Hmm if I had to choose it would have to be the beans bunny, just just something really simple about it but delicious. The bunny chow come with a serving of Indian salad made with chilli and carrot. The meal has to be eaten with fingers. It is the essential take away meal when visiting Durban, the main city on the east coast of South Africa.

Mango Chutney
Mango Chutney | Source

Chutney


Another Indian insured dish, which is a piquant sauce made from fruit or tomatoes. Tomato chutney is an accompaniment to most Indian meals but chutney was made commercial by the Mr Bols Chutney range.

Boebotie
Boebotie | Source

Boebotie

This Malay dish has been adapted by the Dutch and now remains a popular Afrikaner dish. It is often likened to Shepereds pie. The only difference is the use of bread as a crust rather than mashed potatoes.

Biltong
Biltong | Source

Biltong


This is a famous South African snack made from dried meat.

Milk Tart
Milk Tart | Source

Milk tart


This tasty treat is a pastry shell filled with milk filling. Try out your own milk tart, recipe is included below.

Durban Curry
Durban Curry | Source

Durban Curry


Durban is the largest South African city on the East Coast of the country. Durban contains a significant Indian Population ( 4 generation South Africans and the descendants of Indentured Indian Laborers), as a result Durban is synonymous with curry and Indian cuisine.

Curry is a very popular dish in South Africa, though the Durban curry is uniquely South African. South African Indian dishes are much spicy than the traditional Indian dishes. Creamy dishes such as Korma's are not part of the daily cuisine, though you can find them in local Indian restaurants.

Chakaklaka
Chakaklaka | Source

Chakalaka


This dish is an African inspired accompaniment to braaied meat.Pap and vleis (porridge and meat) is another common African inspired dish.

Poitjie Kos
Poitjie Kos | Source

Poitjie Kos


Poitjie is a there legged pot which stands over fire. The poitjiekos is a combination of meat and vegetables cooked in low heat over open fire. This delicious dish is great with braaivleis.

Oumas Rusks
Oumas Rusks | Source

Rusks


Rusks are the Afrikaner version of biscotti, crispy biscuits which are dunked in coffee. Rusks are manufactured and exported under the brand Oumas Rusk. According to the company the tradition of making rusks dates back to the days of the depression in the 1930’s when woman in a church group began pooling money together to save. One of the woman names Ouma Greyvensteyn used her share of the money to make rusks which were popular in no time. Ouma’s rusks are a great winter time treat with hot coffee.

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