The Survival Guide To Long Term Food Storage: Part 2

Let's look at the different types of grains to consider storing, and how each one stacks up against the others:

Hard Grains

Kamut
Dry Corn
Buckwheat
Flax
Durum Wheat
Millet
Hard White Wheat
Hard Red Wheat
Soft Wheat
Triticale
Spelt

Hard grains are the longest lasting of all the food products, as their outer shell acts as a natural hermetically sealed container. Under optimal oxygen free conditions at a stable, constant, cool room temperature expect up to twenty-five years of storage.

Soft Grains

Groats
Hulled or Pearled Oat
Barley
Quinoa
Rolled Oats

These have relatively soft outer shells which fail to protect the delicate and fragile seed interior to the same degree as the seeds which have harder shells. These soft grains will not store for as long a period as the hard grains. Under optimal oxygen free conditions at a stable, constant, cool room temperature expect up to fifteen years of storage.

Beans

Garbanzo Beans
Blackeye Beans
Adzuki Beans
Black Turtle Beans
Kidney Beans
Great Northern
Lima Beans
Lentils
Pink Beans
Mung Beans
Small Red Beans
Pinto Beans
Soy Beans

Beans lose their internal oils as they age and then will resist absorbing water and swelling to make them easily edible. Under optimal oxygen free conditions at a stable, constant, cool room temperature expect up to twenty years of storage.

Pasta

Spaghetti
Noodles
Macaroni
Rigatoni
Penne
Elbows
Shells
Fusilli
Fettucine
Vermicelli
Orzo
Linguine

Pasta tends to last longer than flour in storage, of course it must be kept meticulously dry. Under optimal oxygen free conditions at a stable, constant, cool room temperature expect up to eighteen years of storage.

Dehydrated Vegetables

Celery
Cabbage
Broccoli
Carrots
Peppers
Onions
Green Beans
Potatoes
Mushrooms
Corn
Tomatoes
Peas
Parsnips

Fully dehydrated vegetables are excellent candidates for long term storage. Under optimal oxygen free conditions at a stable, constant, cool room temperature expect up to eighteen years of storage.

Dehydrated Fruits

Strawberries
Cherries
Bananas
Apples
Pineapples
Pears
Peaches
Apricots

Fruits can last a surprisingly long time in dehydrated storage conditions. Under optimal oxygen free conditions at a stable, constant, cool room temperature expect up to twenty years of storage.

Dehydrated Dairy

Butter or Margarine Powder
Cocoa Powder
Cheese Powder
Powder Eggs
Powder Milk
Whey Powder

Fat free dairy products tend to store for much longer periods than those that contain fat. Under optimal oxygen free conditions at a stable, constant, cool room temperature expect up to four years of storage.

Flour & Cracked Seed Products

White Flour
Bakers Flour
All Purpose Flour
Unbleached Flour
Cornmeal
Whole Wheat Flour
Refried Beans
Mixes
Germade
Cracked Wheat
Wheat Flakes
Gluten

Once the seed's outer shell has been broken, the nutrients inside the seed begin to degrade. Under optimal oxygen free conditions at a stable, constant, cool room temperature expect up to six years of storage.

Optimal oxygen free conditions at a stable, constant, cool room temperature are critical to store all of these following food products for a prolonged period of time:

Brown Rice
White Rice
Peanut Butter Powder

With all of these foods you can expect up to five years of storage.

Salt and Sugar should last virtually forever if kept oxygen free, cool and dry.

Continued In The Survival Guide To Long Term Food Storage: Part 3

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1 comment

Food insurance 6 years ago

Good info. Emergency food kits are very important. I have a friend who was in Chile a few months ago when the earthquake occurred. Thanks to those emergency kits she was able to survive and come back home safely. So we should all be prepared because we never know when or where we can be in a natural disaster. Thanks for your post!

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