Trees Around My Quarter Acre Lot

Taking a tour of the fruits and nuts on about a third of an Acre.

When my wife and I brought our last three of five children to Utah in the 1980s, along with an unreasonably large dog and with our Concorde station wagon pulling a modest U-Haul trailer, we arrived at the house we were buying sight unseen.

The house exceeded our expectations and we have enjoyed it ever since. Beside the house. and between the house and a school district bus yard (now a maintenance yard) was an orchard of apple trees. The orchard was part of a larger orchard which had been cut down to create a housing subdividion of which our home sitting on its corner lot was on the southwest corner of the subdivision.

While the orchard's owners waited to decide whether or not to accept our offer for the orchard lot, time passed and they decided to cut down the lot's apple trees rather than do the compulsory sprayings.

We finally were able to purchase the empty lot for our own garden and orchard.

My first fruit tree planting had been a Santa Rosa plum tree outside my wife's kitchen window so she could see the plum blossoms each spring. This year she and the birds harvested over 2,300 plums from that, now old, plum tree which is taller than our two storey house.

After planting a nice variety of Jackson Perkins rose bushes, I planted some green grapes vines along our back fence, and then Concord grapes on trellises. We had one apple tree on our property (a survivor of the orchard, which survived only because it was within our property line.)

We wanted more, and when we were finally able to purchase the adjoining lot, we started an ongoing process of plantings which is now in its advancing years.

The garden was planned to occupy the center of the adjoining lot, so the fruit and nut trees have been planted around the edges of the lot.

Besides strawberries and raspberries, here is what we have now, including what was planted on the original house lot our home sits on:

See what you think, and then think about what you see.

Two trees of Asian pears.  They are the tall trees.
Two trees of Asian pears. They are the tall trees. | Source
Jerusalem artichokes.
Jerusalem artichokes.
(l to r) Artichoke, Asian Pear trees, apricot trees,
(l to r) Artichoke, Asian Pear trees, apricot trees,
Apricot trees with colored buckets of tomato plants.
Apricot trees with colored buckets of tomato plants.
A Summer Pearl cling peach tree.  Our favorite as to flavor.
A Summer Pearl cling peach tree. Our favorite as to flavor.
In the black plastic tree bucket is a young plum tree bearing 3 different plums with two grafted in.  It will be the next tree to be planted.
In the black plastic tree bucket is a young plum tree bearing 3 different plums with two grafted in. It will be the next tree to be planted.
A young Flat And Wonderful Peach tree.
A young Flat And Wonderful Peach tree.
A young Elberta Peach tree.
A young Elberta Peach tree.
A young Bartlett pear tree.
A young Bartlett pear tree.
An English walnut tree.
An English walnut tree.
Two red currant bushes in front of a Blue Butterfly bush.
Two red currant bushes in front of a Blue Butterfly bush.
A Black Walnut tree and a clump of young Plumcot trees in the foreground..
A Black Walnut tree and a clump of young Plumcot trees in the foreground..
A young pear tree, and behind it is a clump of Plumcot trees which are still quite young.
A young pear tree, and behind it is a clump of Plumcot trees which are still quite young.
A young peach tree beset by a young Chinese Elm that will be clipped back.
A young peach tree beset by a young Chinese Elm that will be clipped back.
Twin young Bartlett pear trees growing side by side, planted by my wife or the birds.
Twin young Bartlett pear trees growing side by side, planted by my wife or the birds.
A quince tree clump. (They are high in pectin for jams and jellies, including quince jelly.)
A quince tree clump. (They are high in pectin for jams and jellies, including quince jelly.)
A dwarf Golden Delicious apple tree.
A dwarf Golden Delicious apple tree.
An Elberta peach tree.
An Elberta peach tree.
A Ginkgo Biloba tree. The leaves of this tree are fine in salads and even dried in capsules they aid memory.  It was the only variety of tree to survive the atomic bomb blast in Hiroshima, Japan.  It has another Chinese Elm with it that needs removal
A Ginkgo Biloba tree. The leaves of this tree are fine in salads and even dried in capsules they aid memory. It was the only variety of tree to survive the atomic bomb blast in Hiroshima, Japan. It has another Chinese Elm with it that needs removal
A Bartlett pear tree with a few of our blackberry plants showing at its base.
A Bartlett pear tree with a few of our blackberry plants showing at its base.
A Bing cherry tree.
A Bing cherry tree.
Our other Bing cherry tree.
Our other Bing cherry tree.
A second variety of Goji bush with garlic chives to its left..
A second variety of Goji bush with garlic chives to its left..
Three resurgent rhubarb plants.  They had suffered earlier from lack of water while we went on vacation for a week.
Three resurgent rhubarb plants. They had suffered earlier from lack of water while we went on vacation for a week.
Our largest clump of Goji Berries bushes.
Our largest clump of Goji Berries bushes.
 Our only apple tree 35 years ago.  Perhaps a Gravenstien Apple tree.
Our only apple tree 35 years ago. Perhaps a Gravenstien Apple tree.
Part of our original grape vines which are very productive and enjoy climbing into the neighboring trees.  They are green grapes.
Part of our original grape vines which are very productive and enjoy climbing into the neighboring trees. They are green grapes.
Our Concord grape vines.  Three other varieties are young and planted just beyond this row and to the left.
Our Concord grape vines. Three other varieties are young and planted just beyond this row and to the left.
These twin trees are apple trees described to me as "the original red delicious apple trees, before they were engineered down to supermarket size."  They are the last of our harvest in the Fall and can weigh over a pound apiece!  They're not pruned.
These twin trees are apple trees described to me as "the original red delicious apple trees, before they were engineered down to supermarket size." They are the last of our harvest in the Fall and can weigh over a pound apiece! They're not pruned.
This is what is named a Hardy Fig.  While it does survive our Utah winter, it starts growth late in the spring and never matures the fruit, possibly because it is too shaded by the two walnut trees.
This is what is named a Hardy Fig. While it does survive our Utah winter, it starts growth late in the spring and never matures the fruit, possibly because it is too shaded by the two walnut trees.
Barely discernible in this clump of Hollyhocks you can see a very young Pomegranate tree which also roused itself late this spring, so late that I thought it had died from winter kill. But there it is trying to thrive.
Barely discernible in this clump of Hollyhocks you can see a very young Pomegranate tree which also roused itself late this spring, so late that I thought it had died from winter kill. But there it is trying to thrive.
This is a fall photo of the Santa Rosa Plum tree and was taken several years ago.  Taller than our two storey home
This is a fall photo of the Santa Rosa Plum tree and was taken several years ago. Taller than our two storey home | Source
In full bloom in this photo from April 2012.
In full bloom in this photo from April 2012. | Source
Look carefully at this SE exit from our garden and you will see a young buck that had nibbled on our "vegetbl-ation", and had a drink from the birdbaths, and had lain down in the shade, before I entered from the NW corner so MNJ photographed his exit
Look carefully at this SE exit from our garden and you will see a young buck that had nibbled on our "vegetbl-ation", and had a drink from the birdbaths, and had lain down in the shade, before I entered from the NW corner so MNJ photographed his exit | Source

And then there are harvests, too.

One year's peaches from my one Elberta Peach tree!  (450 of them)
One year's peaches from my one Elberta Peach tree! (450 of them) | Source

it takes some watering....

While May 2015 set the record for rainfall in a month of May, June and July of 2015 were very dry. Keeping the plants healthy and growing has taken a lot of watering, not to mention the watering of the vegetables (and the deer) which survived for us to enjoy.

A late frost and snow reduced the cherry crop and eliminated this year's apricots, but the cherry and apricot trees (23 growing almost like a hedge and grown from the seeds of fruits from a friend's tree) are doing nicely and we hope for bumper harvests of cherries and apricots in 2016.

I hope you found this tour interesting, and that this tour gave you an idea of what can be done in order to have your own fruits and nuts for canning, cooking, and juicing. It's work, but it's worth it.

© 2015 Demas W. Jasper All rights reserved.

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12 comments

Dana Tate profile image

Dana Tate 16 months ago from LOS ANGELES

It appears you have a nice piece of land there. Someday I hope to buy a nice piece of land, where I can grow my own vegetables. Beautiful pic's by the way.


Perspycacious profile image

Perspycacious 16 months ago from Today's America and The World Beyond Author

Dana Tate - Land in some parts of California can be quite reasonable. My oldest son has a home for sale in Tollhouse, CA following his move to Fairbanks, AK, and he realizes he may not get what it is really worth for the sale.

Thanks for the look-see and comments.


annart profile image

annart 16 months ago from SW England

How lovely to have an 'estate' where you can grow your own fruit etc. I do my best with our little garden (runner beans, rhubarb, herbs and the occasional lettuce) but your vast area is something else! As you say, lots of work but so rewarding.

Thanks for the enjoyable tour.

Ann


BlossomSB profile image

BlossomSB 16 months ago from Victoria, Australia

I'm jealous! Your land is so productive and all the plants look so healthy. Thank you for sharing it in this way. Enjoy!


Perspycacious 16 months ago

annart - By "runner beans" I presume you mean "pole beans"? Did you see my Chopstick Bean Poles"? Much usage from a small space. Thanks for telling me you enjoyed this Hub.

BlossomSB


Perspycacious 16 months ago

BlossomSB - Oh how my fruit and nut trees are enjoying today's steady rain! Glad you enjoyed the "tour".


aviannovice profile image

aviannovice 16 months ago from Stillwater, OK

Wow, what an orchard you have. This must be a bird haven, too.


Perspycacious profile image

Perspycacious 16 months ago from Today's America and The World Beyond Author

aviannovice - Yes, it is. Hummingbirds nest there. California jays, robins, mourning doves, sparrows, barn swallows, quail, pheasants, magpies, starlings, thrushes, wrens, and a bird about the size of the wrens but having a light yellow underbelly with grey-brown upper body.

Then there are the deer, ground squirrels, and butterflies to enjoy. Quite an enjoyable place to sit of an evening!


Perspycacious profile image

Perspycacious 16 months ago from Today's America and The World Beyond Author

The unidentified birds like to sit on the chicory and even hanging head down will feed contentedly on those plants' seeds which are always ready for them and for the wrens this time of the year.


Perspycacious profile image

Perspycacious 15 months ago from Today's America and The World Beyond Author

This summer's efforts are being rewarded right now with delicious, juicy peaches and pears. Apples and grapes will follow with future years' harvests to look forward to. The time invested in planting, pruning, spraying, and watering, has rewards commensurate with the efforts.


Perspycacious profile image

Perspycacious 14 months ago from Today's America and The World Beyond Author

I added a photo of the peaches harvested one late summer from just the Elberta Peach tree.


Perspycacious profile image

Perspycacious 13 months ago from Today's America and The World Beyond Author

It is now the third week in October 2015. Winds and some soaking rains (finally) are starting the dropping of the leaves after a lingering summer and what appears to be an ongoing Indian Summer.

All the fruits have been harvested except for the Gravenstien and Delicious apples. The Gravenstiens are dropping, but the Delicious are still ripening even at this late stage, though we have yet to have our first frost.

Te Black Walnut tree was the first to shed all its leaves. The pomegranate did grow well with constant watering in what was a very dry summer which followed a spring that started with a late frost and light snow which denied us apricots this year and limited our crop of cherries.

I picked the last Asian and Bartlett pears yesterday 10/19/2015. If the Asian pear is dead ripe it has more of an apple flavor, explaining why some stores label them Asian Apples. We prefer them picked before they start to fall.

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