Tropical Cooking with Travel Man: Dessert - Sweet Guava Pulp

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Introduction

Guavas abound everywhere, here in the Philippines. It is usually being spread by birds that are eating its ripe fruits, aside from the locals, including I, who frequent guava trees in our backyard.

The most common is the green variety (turned yellow when already ripened) or the apple guava.

The fragrance of its ripeness stirred my youthful vigor and relive adventures of climbing guava trees, risking my skin with the worm pest, we call it lipay (the moth called Ello Sphinx, common on its trunk with its camouflage skin coloring.

This October 2013, most fruits of guava trees are starting to ripen and I took the opportunity to make a version of the sweet preserve that my parents usually cook when I was still a child.

Guavas (Psidium Guyava) have many varieties in almost all parts of the world, especially in tropical or sub-tropical countries.

It can be grown through its seeds or from its branches by way of marcotting.


Sweet Guava Pulp

Minatamis na Bayabas, in Filipino language (Photo Source: Ireno Alcala aka travel_man1971)
Minatamis na Bayabas, in Filipino language (Photo Source: Ireno Alcala aka travel_man1971)

Cook Time

Prep time: 20 min
Cook time: 20 min
Ready in: 40 min
Yields: Serves four persons 3.5 ounces of Sweet Guava Pulp

Ingredients

  • 250 grams guava, ripe, peeled, cored, sliced into strips
  • 250 grams brown sugar
  • 2 cups coconut milk
  • 1 pinch salt

How to Cook the Sweet Guava Pulp

  1. Wash and peel the guavas.
  2. Cut in halves and core, removing all seeds.
  3. Cut into strips.
  4. Heat the coconut milk in a pan.
  5. Add the brown sugar, stirring slowly until it bubbles.
  6. Add the guava strips and let it boil until done.

Nutritional Contents of Sweet Guava Pulp

Nutrition Facts
Serving size: 100 grams
% Daily Value *
Fat 1 g2%
Carbohydrates 14 g5%
Sugar 9 g
Fiber 5 g20%
Protein 3 g6%
Sodium 2 mg
* The Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet, so your values may change depending on your calorie needs. The values here may not be 100% accurate because the recipes have not been professionally evaluated nor have they been evaluated by the U.S. FDA.

How I prepared for this special 'sweet' task

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Travel Man picking the ripe guavas (Photo Source: Ireno Alcala)The term "guava" appears to derive from Arawak guayabo "guava tree", via the Spanish guayaba. It has been adapted in many European and Asian languages, having a similar form. (Wikipedia)Ripe Guavas (In some Middle-Eastern regions including Pakistan and North India, guava is also called amrood, possibly a variant of armoot meaning "pear" in Arabic and Turkish languages.)Peeling the guavas (Another term for guavas is pera, derived from pear. It is common around the western Indian Ocean and probably derives from Spanish or Portuguese.)Don't include the 'crowns' of the guavas to avoid the bitter taste. (Guavas are rich in dietary fiber, vitamins A and C, folic acid, and the dietary minerals, potassium, copper and manganese. )Core the guavas. (From preliminary medical research in laboratory models, extracts from apple guava leaves or bark are implicated in therapeutic mechanisms against cancer, bacterial infections, inflammation and pain.)Guava Pulps (Guava pulp may be sweet or sour, tasting something between pear and strawberry, off-white ("white" guavas) to deep pink ("red" guavas)Cutting the guava pulps into stripsSet aside the peelings and cored seeds of guavas. Include it while extracting the coconut milk.Guava Pulp StripsSqueezing grated coconut in little water plus the guava peelings and cored seedsMain ingredients -Sweet Guava Pulp
Travel Man picking the ripe guavas (Photo Source: Ireno Alcala)The term "guava" appears to derive from Arawak guayabo "guava tree", via the Spanish guayaba. It has been adapted in many European and Asian languages, having a similar form. (Wikipedia)
Travel Man picking the ripe guavas (Photo Source: Ireno Alcala)The term "guava" appears to derive from Arawak guayabo "guava tree", via the Spanish guayaba. It has been adapted in many European and Asian languages, having a similar form. (Wikipedia)
Ripe Guavas (In some Middle-Eastern regions including Pakistan and North India, guava is also called amrood, possibly a variant of armoot meaning "pear" in Arabic and Turkish languages.)
Ripe Guavas (In some Middle-Eastern regions including Pakistan and North India, guava is also called amrood, possibly a variant of armoot meaning "pear" in Arabic and Turkish languages.)
Peeling the guavas (Another term for guavas is pera, derived from pear. It is common around the western Indian Ocean and probably derives from Spanish or Portuguese.)
Peeling the guavas (Another term for guavas is pera, derived from pear. It is common around the western Indian Ocean and probably derives from Spanish or Portuguese.)
Don't include the 'crowns' of the guavas to avoid the bitter taste. (Guavas are rich in dietary fiber, vitamins A and C, folic acid, and the dietary minerals, potassium, copper and manganese. )
Don't include the 'crowns' of the guavas to avoid the bitter taste. (Guavas are rich in dietary fiber, vitamins A and C, folic acid, and the dietary minerals, potassium, copper and manganese. )
Core the guavas. (From preliminary medical research in laboratory models, extracts from apple guava leaves or bark are implicated in therapeutic mechanisms against cancer, bacterial infections, inflammation and pain.)
Core the guavas. (From preliminary medical research in laboratory models, extracts from apple guava leaves or bark are implicated in therapeutic mechanisms against cancer, bacterial infections, inflammation and pain.)
Guava Pulps (Guava pulp may be sweet or sour, tasting something between pear and strawberry, off-white ("white" guavas) to deep pink ("red" guavas)
Guava Pulps (Guava pulp may be sweet or sour, tasting something between pear and strawberry, off-white ("white" guavas) to deep pink ("red" guavas)
Cutting the guava pulps into strips
Cutting the guava pulps into strips
Set aside the peelings and cored seeds of guavas. Include it while extracting the coconut milk.
Set aside the peelings and cored seeds of guavas. Include it while extracting the coconut milk.
Guava Pulp Strips
Guava Pulp Strips
Squeezing grated coconut in little water plus the guava peelings and cored seeds
Squeezing grated coconut in little water plus the guava peelings and cored seeds
Main ingredients -Sweet Guava Pulp
Main ingredients -Sweet Guava Pulp

The Way I Cook the Sweet Guava Pulp

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Coconut Milk -Brown SugarLet the coconut milk and brown sugar simmer.Adding the guava pulpReady for serving
Coconut Milk -
Coconut Milk -
Brown Sugar
Brown Sugar
Let the coconut milk and brown sugar simmer.
Let the coconut milk and brown sugar simmer.
Adding the guava pulp
Adding the guava pulp
Ready for serving
Ready for serving

Encounters with guava and its sweet allure

When I was in elementary grades, I always save my money because I already have ripe guavas for snacks.

My frequent problem was the difficulty in bowel movement. I also drank lots of water to ease such discomfort.

I don't know, but the allure of guava's ripe fragrance is one of tropical cravings.

I usually eat raw guavas, but its abundance and cheap price in the market made me think ways to prolong its presence in the kitchen.

My elder sister used to make guava jellies. The other one, used to dilute its sappy ripe pulp with water and make a tropical refreshing drink from it.

Well, my father (when he was still living), used to add it's pulp to boiled fish in order to make a version of Sinigang na Isda sa Bayabas (Stewed Fish in Guava) instead of adding vinegar as the sour ingredient.

Indeed, its culinary uses are now recognized in many countries around the world, especially in Brazil, Mexico, Taiwan and Pakistan (its winter national fruit).

Mind you, we used to make those guava twigs as toothbrush substitute. Really! When we pounded the main end of the twig and added it with salt, it whitened our teeth, even without the use of the commercial toothpaste.

Nowadays, I used to chew guava young leaves for fresh breath and for lowering blood pressure.

Guava leaves can also be boiled and serves as tea that benefits blood circulation.

Herbalists used to use its leaves and bark for treating bacterial infection, cleansing wounds and easing pain for newly circumcised teenagers when cleaning wounds.

Guava has an anti-cancer properties which is still being studied by medical researchers.

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Comments 10 comments

ChitrangadaSharan profile image

ChitrangadaSharan 2 years ago from New Delhi, India

This sounds delicious! A very well written hub with helpful pictures.

It is good to know that Guava is found in abundance in Philippines. This dessert is worth trying. Thanks for sharing the details! Voted up!


Thelma Alberts profile image

Thelma Alberts 2 years ago from Germany

I have guava trees at home and my relatives are not eating them. I made smoothies out of those fruits and even my father who don´t like guava found my smoothie yummy. I made the smoothies with other fruits that´s why he was not able to smell the guava. Thanks for sharing this hub. Voted up and useful. I´ll try this recipe soon.


hawaiianodysseus profile image

hawaiianodysseus 2 years ago from Southeast Washington state

You're doing an awesome job with these delicious P.I. recipes, my friend. I miss guava...used to eat them all the time during my youth on Kaua'i, the northwestern and oldest main island of the Hawaiian archipelago. Maybe you've been there?

Guava is good for remedying constipation, right? Is that what you meant in the paragraph that begins with: "My frequent problem...?" Or did you mean that eating guava can make you constipated?

Thanks for sharing, my Filipino brother! I am quarter Filipino, quarter Hawaiian, and 1/2 Okinawan.

Aloha!

~Joe


CrisSp profile image

CrisSp 2 years ago from Sky Is The Limit Adventure

You just took me back in time when I used to play around the block and climb guava trees with my childhood friends...nostalgia. And, yes the smell of "sinigang sa bayabas" that lingers in the house. Hmm...extra rice please!

Great useful hub! Voting up and certainly passing the goodness along.

Mabuhay!


travel_man1971 profile image

travel_man1971 2 years ago from Bicol, Philippines Author

@ ChitrangadaSharan: Thanks for the appreciation. This is a one-in-a-jiffy guava recipe that I'm sure you'll like.


travel_man1971 profile image

travel_man1971 2 years ago from Bicol, Philippines Author

@ Thelma Alberts: Hi, Ma'am Thelma. It's good to know that your father got a dose of your guava smoothie. I have a cousin who also didn't like the smell of ripe guava and when I offered my homemade 'sweet guava pulp' she declined openly.


travel_man1971 profile image

travel_man1971 2 years ago from Bicol, Philippines Author

@ hawaiianodysseus: Thanks, Sir Joe. I'm sure the guava seeds that I've eaten made it hard for me to excrete solid waste (lol). Anyways, I'm glad that guavas also abound in Hawaii.

This fruit makes a lot of connection and fond memories.

-Ireno


travel_man1971 profile image

travel_man1971 2 years ago from Bicol, Philippines Author

@ CrisSp: I'm glad to know that there were many happy 'guava' memories in your life, too! Thanks for passing and sharing the happy thoughts on this fruit.

Mabuhay!


Ana Luisa U. 2 years ago

I love guallabas when I lived in Mexico state of Jalisco my grandma well mama Chita her nick name . Was three yrs old when her back yard she had guallaba tree pick the frt some them they had difrent sizes color yellow,, green, she cut it in halve she sprincle some salt. And squeeze limon on I took the First byte it was delicioso. Last year I went to the supermarket and i found guallas i got full bag them and agua fresca it was sooooo good. I love your recepi. Learn something new every day thanks.


travel_man1971 profile image

travel_man1971 2 years ago from Bicol, Philippines Author

@Ana Luisa U.: Nice having you here and dropping by at my site via this article.

Thank you for adding my recipe to your must-have list. :)

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