Types of Crab Meat

Blue crabs are super tasty!
Blue crabs are super tasty! | Source

Blue Crabs

We love the meat from blue crabs! When we visit the coasts of Georgia and Florida, we often catch our own. We boil or steam the crabs and enjoy a seafood feast. If there are any leftovers, we pick the meat to use in crab recipes, including crab cakes, crab dip, crab spread, crab salad, and casseroles. If we don’t have any crabmeat on hand when I get a craving for the stuff, I have to resort to purchasing it from a supermarket or fish market. As you probably already know, crab meat is expensive. In fact, some of it is very expensive, like $50 a pound. That’s often the case with jumbo lump crabmeat. Do you need to buy the most expensive type of crabmeat for the best flavor in your crabmeat recipes? Not necessarily. If you’ll read the guide below, you’ll see what I mean.

Crabmeat comes in several forms.
Crabmeat comes in several forms. | Source

Crabmeat

Meat can come from several parts of blue crabs. It can be retrieved from the claws, the legs, the fins, and the body cavity. The size, texture, color, and flavor depend on which body part the flesh came from. The size can range from tiny flakes to large, meaty chunks. The texture can be somewhat different, too, as can the color. The meat from the body is usually white, while the meat from the claws is often light brownish, sometimes with a pinkish hue.

Which tastes the best? The flavor of the different types of crabmeat is subjective. Some people prefer the more delicate flavor of body meat, while others prefer the taste of the meat from the claws. Claw meat usually has a more pronounced, “crabbier” flavor.

Pasteurized canned crab is a good alternative to fresh crabmeat.
Pasteurized canned crab is a good alternative to fresh crabmeat. | Source

Canned Crabmeat vs. Fresh Crabmeat

Unless you buy live crabs and steam and pick the meat yourself, the best choice for buying crabmeat is the refrigerated type. It usually comes in a can and is pasteurized. Canned pasteurized crabmeat is usually wild caught and might come from the U.S., Venezuela, Mexico, or China, Indonesia, and other Asian waters. The crabs are cooked, picked, and canned. Then the cans are heated and quickly chilled. The resulting product has a refrigeration life of months, if left unopened.

You can also buy picked crabmeat that hasn’t been pasteurized. It usually comes in plastic containers and has to be refrigerated. Some cooks think it has a superior flavor to pasteurized crab meat, but it doesn’t keep as long. It’s usually best to use this type of crabmeat within about ten days.

No matter which type of crab you choose – pasteurized or fresh packed – it’s fully cooked and ready to eat. Of course, you can also use it in lots of yummy crab recipes!

Crab Casserole
Crab Casserole | Source

Crab Claws

You can buy refrigerated or frozen crab claws. They’re available with part of the shell removed, with the pincers left intact. Most of the meat is exposed. These are great to use heated and served with drawn butter, or served chilled with cocktail sauce. They can also be battered and fried in hot oil.

Crab claw meat can be purchased in refrigerated cans. In this case, there’s no shell. The meat is ready to eat as is or to use in recipes. The meat is firm, so it doesn’t fall apart easily when combined with other ingredients. Also, because of its strong flavor, it doesn’t get lost among spices and herbs you might want to use in your crab recipes. Another advantage of buying claw meat is that it’s usually the cheapest of all types of crabmeat.

I use crab claw meat in dips, spreads, and fritters. Sometimes I also use it in casseroles and quiches.

Crab Fritters
Crab Fritters | Source

Special Crabmeat

Special crab meat is extracted from the crab’s body, without the meat from the claws or the rear swimming fin muscle. It’s white in color and has a sweet, mild flavor. To be honest, I rarely use this type of crab meat, but many cooks and chefs prefer it for their crab cakes, crab fritters, and crab tacos.

Crab Appetizers
Crab Appetizers | Source
Crab-Stuffed Peppers
Crab-Stuffed Peppers | Source
Fried Crab Claws
Fried Crab Claws | Source
Crab - Stuffed Mushrooms
Crab - Stuffed Mushrooms | Source
Crab Dip
Crab Dip | Source
Crab Rangoon
Crab Rangoon | Source

Backfin Crab Meat

Backfin meat is usually a combination of small chunks and shreds of crab. It’s creamy white in color and has a delicate flavor. It’s often used for crab cakes because it provides larger pieces that stand out, along with smaller pieces that blend well with the other crab cake ingredients. It can also be used successfully in dips, spreads, casseroles, chowders, and soups. I like to use backfin crab meat in my crab stew, which is a mixture of cream, diced potatoes, onion, green and red bell peppers, garlic, celery, butter, flour, and saffron, along with some “secret” spices. I also use this type of crab inmy crab rangoon, too.

Crab Cakes
Crab Cakes | Source

Lump Crab Meat

Lump crab meat is the term usually used to describe a mixture of entire lumps of meat from smaller crabs, along with broken lumps. The meat is sweet, mild, and white, but it’s not as expensive as jumbo lump crab meat. Some brands might also include some pieces of body meat in the mix, especially if the product is labeled as “super lump crabmeat.”

Crab Crepes
Crab Crepes | Source

Jumbo Lump Crabmeat

Jumbo lump crabmeat is the most expensive type of crab meat, in most cases. This meat comes from the muscle that operates the swimming fin, located at the crab’s rear end. Each crab produces only two chunks of jumbo lump crabmeat. When the meat comes from extra large crabs, it’s often referred to as colossal or mega jumbo lump crab meat.

Jumbo lump crab meat is snowy white in color and has a very mild flavor. In crab recipes, the size of the lumps is often more important than the flavor. The flavor isn’t really that much different than you’ll get by using lump, special, or backfin meat, but you’ll get big chunks of crabmeat that stand apart from your other ingredients. I always use jumbo lump crabmeat in crab crepes.




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Comments 7 comments

lemonkerdz profile image

lemonkerdz 2 years ago from TRUJILLO, PERU

Habees crabee hub was really interesting.

Wish i could just get hold of some crabmeat tinned or fresh.

Voting up


habee profile image

habee 2 years ago from Georgia Author

Thanks, lemonkerdz!


randomcreative profile image

randomcreative 2 years ago from Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Thanks for putting together this comprehensive resource! What a great go to guide for both new and experienced chefs.


breakfastpop profile image

breakfastpop 2 years ago

If it were possible to eat a picture, most of yours would be gone!


TurtleDog profile image

TurtleDog 2 years ago

Love it! In NJ we'll get blue crab omlets from time to time. Somewhat gamey but when I'm in the mood for that, nothing beats it


Sarah 2 years ago

The very worst part of moving is finidng a new mexican restaurant, luckily for me, I am surrounded by mexican food here. I'm an enchilada eater too any my fav place knows what I'm going to order when I walk in and they just bring me my diet coke along with the chips and salsa. I've been known to order a margarita at dinner from time to time but at lunch it is always the chicken enchilada and a diet coke. I keep telling myself I'll branch out and try a different dish but that never happens. lolI think I would love Ole Ole too. I love thin chips and not too hot salsa. Adios Ole Ole, I hope you find something you like as well in your new town.


Glenn 2 years ago

Looks like a great place - I can see why you'll miss it. Mexican food is my favorite, but up here in the North Country there aren't that many to cohose from, although there are lots of good Italian and Asian places. But since I also love crab, the thing I'd miss most would be the Maryland-style crab cakes that most restaurants up here make. I'm getting hungry just thinking about it!

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