How to Use up your leftover bread easy recipes, Bread and Butter pudding and a Tuscan La Panzanella

Wow I can't wait to cut into this
Wow I can't wait to cut into this | Source

Bread and Butter


Hi welcome, come on in and enjoy the warmth of our hearth.

My friend and I often have cook nights, and we also like to bake bread; there is sometimes odd bits of various loaves left over, so what to do with it.

One of the answers is an old favourite ‘Bread and Butter Pudding’. Fabio is from Tuscany and comes from a family of bakers, one of his grandma’s favourite uses of slightly stale bread is a salad dish called ‘La Panzanella.’ She said there are a great deal of recipes for dry bread, because bread was such an important part of the Tuscan diet and when were people were too poor to throw anything away they came up with lots of recipes for using it up.

Bread and Butter pudding


What you need for the Bread and Butter pudding.

A quantity of stale bread, I had all sorts of bits left over, so I just fit them into my oven proof dish. You can if you are using slices of bread, butter them which is quite traditional, but I was using all sorts of shapes and sizes.

use any slightly stale bread
use any slightly stale bread | Source

Ingredients


Sultanas are also traditional, but I’ve used apple, dates, even candied peal in the past in my dishes.

3 eggs.

1 ½ pint of milk.

1 tablespoon of milk powder. This will help thicken and enrich the custard.

50 gms of sugar.

Please rate my recipe

5 stars from 1 rating of Left over Bread
let the custard soak awhile
let the custard soak awhile | Source
Source

A classic all time favourite Pudding



Pre-heat your oven to 180ºc.

In an oven proof dish layer your bread, butter it if you wish, adding the fruit in amongst the bread.

Beat the eggs and sugar and slowly add the milk. I always use a teaspoon of vanilla essence too. Pour the mixture over the bread and let it stand for 20 minutes.

Sprinkle a little nutmeg on the top and bake for 30 minutes, or until golden brown.

Fabio said they often use up the panettone in this way, I intend to make a panettone just to try this, because it sounds great.

You can serve it warm or cold, with extra cream or yogurt, I love hot custard on mine.

Chef's tip

Stale bread can also be used for breadcrumbs of course I have a few recipes already published here on hubs, take a look at them too.

Dry out your old bread on a baking tray and then when you are cooking, place them on the bottom of your oven to really dry them, and then whizz them in your blender and when they are cool keep them in an airtight container. They keep for weeks.


La Panzanella



Tuscan bread salad.

You should have seen the state of the old family cookbook we used for this, it was Fabio’s g-great grandmother’s and looked as if it had been used as a mat a few times.

I know his mother pretty well and she was telling me as she handed over the book with a look of you, damage this and it’s your head on the block, that during the second world war they had to use everything however stale and old it might be. She was definitely not a fan of Mussolini and blamed him for everything.


On with the salad.

Your slightly stale bread, by that I mean anything that is a couple of days old, unless it is supermarket bread and then it is stale before you buy it.

4-6 medium tomatoes, chopped and cut into quarters.

A white onion sliced as thin as you can.

Cucumber, finely sliced.

Fresh herbs, whatever you have on the windowsill or in the garden.

Extra-virgin oil.

Course sea salt and a little pepper.

Black and green olives, or perhaps some bell peppers finely chopped and to give it a little zing what about adding some fresh chilli or jalapenos.

Pine nuts, sunflower and toasted almonds. Give these a little crushing in a mortis and pestle.

Soak the bread in some seasoned water, add a little oil and then squeeze it out into a ball. Crumble it into a bowl, add your salad and herbs, and then sprinkle the nut mix and a little oil over the top. Perhaps you could even grate some cheese and sprinkle that as well.

Give it all a good mixing and leave it to stand for an hour or so, this will allow the flavours to mix and blend.

You can also try this salad with ham, extra cheese and ham, tuna; another vegetarian variation would be to use some really chunky mushrooms. There are tons of variations.

Serve it with fresh bread.

Adventure and Romance

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Comments 30 comments

Lilleyth profile image

Lilleyth 4 years ago from Mid-Atlantic

Sounds yummy! Thank you for sharing.


kashmir56 profile image

kashmir56 4 years ago from Massachusetts

Hi my friend,love this recipe great way to use your stale bread. Sounds good to !

Awesome and vote up !!!


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Lilleyth,

thank you for calling in and taking the time to comment. I've had some for my evening meal tonight from another that I baked today, give it a try it's very tasty.

tony


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Hi Kashmir56, old friend how are you? Give it a try you'll enjoy I'm sure. Thanks for teh comment and the vote too.

Cheers


Derdriu 4 years ago

Tony, What delicious, scrumptious, tasty recipes you offer! Loyal to my Yorkshire ancestors, I love the bread and butter pudding. Loyal to my Italian ancestors, I love the panzanella even though I descend from Pisa! In both cases, it's much appreciated how you provide exact information, helpful hints, and illustrative pictures/video.

Within the last decade, I helped make plum pudding. The session began with naive expectations of stomping plums. Illusions quickly shattered when I realized that I was getting elbow-deep in what looked like masticated bread: ugh! throw up! vomit! But the results were delicious, and I'm way beyond that formative experience now.

Thank you for sharing, voted up + all,

Derdriu


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Derdriu,

many thanks for your kind words, votes, and encouraging critic of this humble yet tasty pudding. I wonder which part of Yorkshire were your ancestors from?

I hope all that vomiting did not end up in the pudding. Where did you make the pudding?

It is obvious from your well crafted reply that you are something of a word smith yourself.

regards, Tony

ps. are you Stessily's sister?


Derdriu 4 years ago

Tony, Somehow I'm not recalling the place in Yorkshire or the name of my paternal great-great-great-great grandfather whose wife was Thomasin and whose son was named Joseph Watkinson (February 14, 1785-July 18, 1880). Let me look at the genealogy for the exact place name when I'm back home.

No, the retching made it to the nearest bathroom in time...fortunately for everyone else present as well as for those who bought my plum pudding at the church bake sale!

Respectfully, Derdriu

P.S. Yes, Stessily is my sister!


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Derdriu

If you did find where the gggggrand family came from I might be able to get some photos for you.

I'm glad you made it to the bathroom, for the plums sake if nothing else.

I thought she was, she had mentioned you, and I can see a similarity in your writing styles. You must have both had very good teachers.

my respects, Tony


Derdriu 4 years ago

Tony, It would be fun to have photos from Yorkshire. Saturday I'll be doing some genealogical work so I'll be sure to check my binder regarding the Watkinson connection.

My greatest teachers were my parents. My father was a trained librarian and teacher whose father was multi-lingual and who died when I was just 10. To this day, I cherish his and my mother's teaching us astronomy, languages, math and sports* before we went to school.

Thank you for the kind comment. It means a lot to me, because education forever is linked in my mind with my parents' example and legacy.

Respectfully, Derdriu

*I was particularly skilled at swimming and baseball playing, the latter being a cricket wannabe without tea breaks -- and undoubtedly a number of other shortcomings in the eyes of those across the pond ;-].


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Derdriu,

There may be some research I can help you with from this side, church records and such like although I've no doubt that they are all on t'internet these days.

You were very fortunate to have such a literate family, it makes a difference.

I love to swim, for the past few years I've been having problems with my legs which has kept me away from the pool; but now at last they have healed and as soon as I can I'll be back swimming.

Baseball I don't understand, I'm sure it is no more difficult than cricket, but why do they wear their striped pygamas to play it in? [joke]

Which languages do you speak, are any of them native American? My claim to fame used to be that I could call bingo in 5 different languages. When I worked abroad I used my own 'desperantum'to converse with others.

I went a full year not speaking English and I was so confussed in my mind that one time I wrote a letter home, read through it and didn't understand a word I'd writen.

take care

regards Tony


Derdriu 4 years ago

Tony, Which languages did you know how to call "Bingo!" in? Where did you work abroad, and what languages did you learn/speak?

I'm happy to hear that whatever problem was keeping you from swimming now is gone and that you'll be out kicking and splashing with the best!

Respectfully, Derdriu

P.S. Thank you for the offer about Yorkshire research. It's much appreciated, and I'll see what information I can get together this weekend.


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Derdriu

How nice of you to write again, I'm delighted.

Languages were, French, German, Italian, Belgium, there numbers are slightly different from the French, English and Russian. I could get by in all the above, but nothing fluent, especially English which I speak with a Yorkshire Dialect and accent. Funny thing was I had to translate in my head from how I would normally phrase something and then convert that to English, before translating to another language.

I have worked for long periods in Russia, India, most western European countries including Luxemburg, Italy, Spain, France, Germany, The Netherlands, Switzerland. Russia was my favourite, but to be honest every country is fabulous when you get to know people. I think I am very liberal and open minded about people, I can work with anyone. I can't speak American or spell that way either. :)

Touch wood everything is on the mend and I hope that it will stay that way.

Water retention problems that really got out of hand.

I wish my fingers could spell and type as fast as I think, because I am forever having to edit things.

I would love to help, we did our family trees a few years back and it was really interesting.

regards

Tony

PS have a nice weekend.


Derdriu 4 years ago

Tony, What wonderful language and travel experiences to lay claim to! Can you write at least a sentence spelling what you say according to the Yorkshire accent?

Take care, and with best wishes to you and your family,

Derdriu

P.S. Aie une bonne fin de semaine! (Aren't online translators cute? As an individual of French ancestry, I know better than that sentence. But I thought it would be "cute" to send as nice weekend wishes ;-].)


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Derdriu

now you've putme on the spot, but I'd say ''av gorra geroff now' translate 'I have to go'. some things are quite amusing.

I used to own a small local magazine which was called Yorkshire Folk and each month I would have a section called the Yorkshire TRanslator, because oftcomed un, none Yorkies can't really understand, especially our southerners. So here is a small offering of Yorky speak, with vertual translation.

Them lugs is that mucky tha’llave tatties growin artonem. Your ears are very dirty. tatties=potatoes. Lugs=ears

Ee sez iz barhna ger a gurtun. He says that he will get a large one. gurt=large, big.

Gheeuz a lickon yer lolly. Could I have a taste of you lollypop.

Summatsup. There seems to be a problem.

Nobut just gorr itin. It only just fit. nobut=only

Nobdizperfect. No one is perfect.

Arwer proper chuffed. I was well pleased.

Yerra gurtgormless lump. You certainly seem to accident prone. gormless=clumsy

Tha’ll attastop thee gallivantin’. You need to settle down.

Gheeower chunterinon. give up grumbling.

the words are easier if you say them out loud, usually they are said without the breaks between the words. Have fun trying to sort them out.

Merci pour vos bons voeux.

great to speak with you again, alseethee.

regards

Tony


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Derdriu Take a look at the Yorkshire speak I sent you a couple of days ago

regards

tony


Derdriu 4 years ago

Tony, That was a struggle! It took me back to days trying to read the Yorkshire accent in "The Secret Garden"! My favorites are "Summatsup" and "Gheeower chunterinon."

Thank you for the choice phrases and their English translations!

Respectfully, Derdriu


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Derdriu

one of my favourites, which I forgot about is

'tinttintin'= It isn't in the tin.

Regional accents are still very strong, but sadly they are tending to fuzz into one because of tv, and Americanisms that drift in with Films and television.

I don't know if it matters really, I'm a bit of a tradisionalist, old fashioned you might say. I like those old values, respect and honour are the two corner stones.

regards

Tony


Derdriu 4 years ago

Tony, That's great...but...If it isn't in the tin, then where is it? ;-]

Respectfully, Derdriu


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Derdriu,

it's goan gorritz sen lost:-]

aal see thee.


Derdriu 4 years ago

Tony, It's gone missing?

Aal see thee, Derdriu


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Derdriu

I think tha must be a proper Yorkshire lass an'no mistake.

i'll atter gerra gait an gerron wi mi work.

regards

Tony


Derdriu 4 years ago

Tony, I understand! My great Yorkshire ancestors would be proud no doubt.

Respectfully, and with best wishes for your work sessions,

Derdriu


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

Derdriu

I'm sure they will be proud whatever.

sorry t'other day I were reight busy, I teach art one night a week in my studio, and I was getting prepared for it. There are only four students left these days, I used to have three classes a day five days and a kids class saturday morning. I had a much bigger studio then.

Have a good weekend.

al see thee

regards Tony


stessily 4 years ago

Tony, Thank you for sharing these two recipes, both of which are exceptionally tempting. The photos also are helpful and enticing. What about the photo of the gorgeous Italian landscape?

Thank you also for including the sweet bread video. This tip is unforgettable: Don't beat the eggs "because the eggs get very emotional".

Bread pudding is a southern staple, another legacy of New World colonization which is assiduously preserved.

Your culinary escapades with Fabio are greatly appreciated!

All the votes and stars.

ttfn,

Stessily


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

stessily

thank you for taking the time to write such a nice and interesting comment, it makes the work seem worth it.

I used to hate this as a kid, but when I was able to refine the recipe to my likeing I began to enjoy it. My family love it with ice cream.

regards

ttfn

Tony


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

stessily

thank you for taking the time to write such a nice and interesting comment, it makes the work seem worth it.

I used to hate this as a kid, but when I was able to refine the recipe to my likeing I began to enjoy it. My family love it with ice cream.

regards

ttfn

Tony


stessily 4 years ago

Tony, Hmm, bread pudding with ice cream!? Are you partial to any particular flavor of ice cream? One of my favorite ice creams is cinnamon. How would that be?

ttfn,

Stessily


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire Author

stessily,

cinnamon sounds good, I have three preferences for ice cream, rum and raisin; pistachio; vanilla.

I've just made a B&B pud this morning raisins, vanilla and pistachio. yum yum. The bread was some Spelt white, nice flavour.

So vanilla ice cream [from my own stock of home made ices] for tea.

my tummy's rumbling at the thought, I thought it was The Enterprise landing.

ttfn

Tony


ignugent17 profile image

ignugent17 3 years ago

Thanks for sharing your recipe. It looks good.

Have a great day! :-)


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 3 years ago from Yorkshire Author

ignugent17

thanks for viewing and your positive comment.

regards

Tony

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