Vitamins in Jelly for a Healthy Diet - Give Up the Goo!

Food Science Laboratories at United HubPages of Planets HQ.
Food Science Laboratories at United HubPages of Planets HQ.

Thank You For Asking

I do not understand your question, Ben Zoltac, but humans are confounding in their questions at times.

Since the Good Ship UHP Hubbertise of HubNugget Fleet is in for a refit, I have free time from my duties as Science OfficerSCI-PI and will apply it in an attempt to deal with your questioning on this strange new topic.

At first blush, it would seem that any jelly that did not contain a portion of vitamins would be merely some sort of plastic goo - manufactured in one of Earth's synthetics factories, for example. Or perhaps by Hollywood for yet another remake of Ghostbusters.... or The Kids in the Hall - whichever of those adolescent-humanoid shows employs slime as a comedy device. The goo might, however, be that which infills artificial body implants of a sort.

What sort of jelly do you speak of - cow's foot jelly, perhaps? Snake jelly made by the local crone on the corner? Hair gel, perhaps. It is all intriguing.

Since you are undoubtedly reduced to purchasing gelatin-pak vitamin supplements from gas stations along the Interstate, I have convened a panel of experts to help me with this topic.

As a Klingon colleague of mine says in his agony column, I will now confront your questions.

Big Ears listening for the perfect jelly recipe.

(Images, public domain)
(Images, public domain)

Professor Papilio Appalachiensis

The Professor is an expert in mountain life and its fine jelly making.
The Professor is an expert in mountain life and its fine jelly making.

Grape Jelly - Commercial Brands are No-Go

All of the commercial brands of grape jelly we tested produced no significant amounts of any vitamins, and only one mineral - sodium. This is likely because the cooking and bottling or canning process destroy all of the vitamins of the fruit, namely grapes. Commercial grape jellies contain carbohydrates and calories. That is what they contain.

Un-jellied, whole grapes yield the following nutritional components:

  • Minerals: calcium, chlorine, copper, fluorine, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, silicon, sulfur.
  • Vitamins: A, B1, B2, B6 and C6.
  • Sulfuric compounds: Beta-carotene, lycopene, ellagic acid, resveratrol, others (all in the grape skins).
  • Antioxidants: anthocyanins, flavones, geraniol, linalol, nerol and tannins.
  • Grape leaves contian other nutritional benefits, being green and leafy.

Because you need to cook the grapes in water, crush them, and drain the juice and toss the skins, you will retain little of the nutritional content.

THE SOLUTION

If you do anything at all to jellify them, you should wash some grapes, keep the skins on but cut and smash them all slightly in a dish, heat them for a minute or two in the microwave, and serve them on toast, English muffins, or ice cream, and derive some nutrition value from them. You could pour them over shortcake or on top of a cake of any type as well. You could add a little honey to the grapes in the microwave.

 

Dr. Attacus "Finch" Atlas in his lab at the University of Bern, Switzerland. he speciallizes in southern jellies of all sorts.
Dr. Attacus "Finch" Atlas in his lab at the University of Bern, Switzerland. he speciallizes in southern jellies of all sorts.

DIY Condiments

Fruits that you do not need to peel in order to make preserves, jams, and compotes with little or no cooking to destroy nutrition are the best to use. These include:

  • Strawberries
  • Raspberries, black raspberries, blackberries, mulberries
  • Raisins - put some in a dish with a little water, warm up in the microwave and you have a sauce. Use less water and you have a type of preserve.

 

Ms. Anartia Amathea, PhD, taking a sample. At night,  she dons her Superhero identity - the Scarlet Peacock. She is current head food science at the Combe Martin Dinosaur and Wildlife Park. Very versatile.
Ms. Anartia Amathea, PhD, taking a sample. At night, she dons her Superhero identity - the Scarlet Peacock. She is current head food science at the Combe Martin Dinosaur and Wildlife Park. Very versatile.
5 stars from 1 rating of Strawberry Jam

Cook Time

  • Prep time: 10 min
  • Cook time: 15 min
  • Ready in: 25 min
  • Yields: 6 Cups of Jam

SCI-Pi's Galactic Low-Sugar Strawberry Jam

A Hardee's table top 1/2 oz. Strawberry Jam Packet provides 2.4 mg of Vitamin C or 4% of the RDA.

This homemade version includes:

  • Only 10 Calories or less per Tablespoon
  • Vitamin C - 10% RDA
  • Vitamin A - 0.2%
  • Vitamin B6 - 0.2%
  • Vitamin B12 - 0.3%
  • Vitamin E - 0.2%
  • Calcium - 0.3%
  • Potassium - 20.7 mg
  • Manganese - 2.0%
  • Iron - just under 1.0%
  • Sodium - a trace
  • Others

INGREDIENTS for 6 Cups of Jam

  • One huge cooking pot
  • A wooden spoon
  • 3 Pounds washed Strawberries - about 10 cups
  • 1/2 Cup sugar or Honey (or the appropriate amount of Sugar Twin sweetener or Stevia; I don't like any of the rest)
  • 3 Tbl Cornstarch
  • 1/3 Cup water - I use spring water
  • Pint canning jars with lids
  • Paraffin (that's wax) to melt for seals - when it melts, it may resemble that goo you were previously eating, but don't be tempted by it. It will indeed gel in the alimentary tract and need surgical removal.

INSTRUCTIONS

  • Place berries in the pot over medium-high heat and cook 10-12 minutes, smashing gently.
  • Add sweetener of your choice and stir while dissolving.
  • Mix cornstarch with the water in a cup, stir briskly, and pour into the pot,
  • Stir briefly to mix well and remove the pot from stove top; pour jam into sterilzed bottles.
  • Melt paraffin carefully in a small pan, pour a thin layer on top of the jams, and cap. Use jam within 3-6 months. If you process in a hot water bath, you'll destroy nutritional content.

Be sure to taste the strawberries for sweetness before you start preparing your strawberry jam. Adjust the sweeteners as you like. You may also use frozen strawberries in this recipes and often, these packages contain sugar and you might not need any further sweetening agent.

Thank you for calling the UHP Hubbertise Science Department. We hope your question has been answered satisfactorily and in good taste. 

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Comments and Ideas 20 comments

BDazzler profile image

BDazzler 6 years ago from Gulf Coast, USA

Patty, you're making me hungry! Stop!


honey's girl 6 years ago

nice hub sis..i like it.


Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty Inglish, MS 6 years ago from North America Author

The jam is really very good, but I want to go cook some grapes now...


Ben Zoltak profile image

Ben Zoltak 6 years ago from Lake Mills, Jefferson County, Wisconsin USA

Ah Patty you melt my heart as though it were made of parraffin wax. I like your alternative jelly/jam, how long do you think it might last without the wax seal? I'm guessing at least a week or two or longer still if you include the corn syrup. I will book mark this article and cherish it forever. You answered my question with a darling glass of humor that I can't recall reading from you before except for maybe in the hubnuggets renderings. As a bonafied peanut butter and jelly junkie, it's always bothered me that commercial jellies don't have any notable RDA vitamins. Nowadays I even see potato and corn chips have some sort of nutrient value beyond carbs and salt, so why not jelly! Anyway, I like your all natural attitude and you are a sweetheart for answering my question so roundly and with your signature pizazz. Now I'm off to Hardees to collect a few hundred jelly packets.


U Neek profile image

U Neek 6 years ago from Georgia, USA

Wow! I've made various jams, jellies, preserves and compotes over the years and never thought about how much nutrition I was throwing away with the peels or by cooking the fruit. I think from now on I will just call some fruits non-preservable, at least in a nutrition sense, and enjoy them in season when they will do the me the most good! Thanks, Patty!


Enelle Lamb profile image

Enelle Lamb 6 years ago from Canada's 'California'

BDazzler is right - you are making me hungry! I will go now to forage for some vitamin deficient jelly and nutrient enriched toast...


mwatkins profile image

mwatkins 6 years ago from Portland, Oregon & Vancouver BC

Your clever way of identifying butterflies to people made me go back and read ALL of their names completely - Great way to write a hub! Thank you!


Hello, hello, profile image

Hello, hello, 6 years ago from London, UK

Thank you, Patty, for an amusing and information hub.


Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty Inglish, MS 6 years ago from North America Author

Ben Zoltac! - for a human, you are perceptive and very likeable :) For unsealed jelly, yes- probably 7-10 days in the fridge. On the counter in warm weather it will grow its own fuzzy science experiment. Corn syrup - yucko!- too gooey for me-- I think you can spread it out and harden it into a type of clearsteel for space windows.

U Neek - Incredible, is it not? have you tried putting grapes in the freezer? very cool and tasty. Dehydrating them about 3/4 of the way to raisins is also good - dehydrator or in a 200 degrees F oven a few hours.

Enelle Lamb! -- Perhaps we can put the non-nutrient gels into a clean spraypaint can for that great toast. Spray cheese, spray jelly.

mwatkins - Butterflies are great friends and academics! Humor is in the garden, I always say.

Hello, hello -- How are you doing? I am happy you visited and smiled.


JenDobson27 profile image

JenDobson27 6 years ago

I'm definitely going to have to try that jam recipe, it's sounds great!


Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty Inglish, MS 6 years ago from North America Author

It tastes great, too!


loveofnight profile image

loveofnight 6 years ago from Baltimore, Maryland

this is a definite must try.....thx 4 share


Ben Zoltak profile image

Ben Zoltak 6 years ago from Lake Mills, Jefferson County, Wisconsin USA

Ooops! I misread corn starch! Not corn syrup! Dually noted, LOL.


Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty Inglish, MS 6 years ago from North America Author

Yah, corn syrup gets too gooey and sticky for me.


drbj profile image

drbj 6 years ago from south Florida

It's hard to believe, Patty, that all the jam and jelly makers passed up the opportunity to fortify their products with something nutritious like vitamins and minerals other than sodium.

Thanks for the eye-opening info.


Ben Zoltak profile image

Ben Zoltak 6 years ago from Lake Mills, Jefferson County, Wisconsin USA

Mulberries and blackberries are forming like alien skin pods around here in Wisconsin, maybe time to challenge myself with some Inglish Jelly!!!!!!!!!!!!


Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty Inglish, MS 6 years ago from North America Author

@drjb and Ben Zoltac - It is jam and jelly time again, so let's make some of the good stuff. I made a mulberry pie once that was quite good, but blackberries are my favorite in addition to strawberries.

Ben Zoltac, you make me laugh!


Ben Zoltak profile image

Ben Zoltak 5 years ago from Lake Mills, Jefferson County, Wisconsin USA

Ah just reread this article again after all these months and it's still making me laugh even now. Laughter is as good for you as home made jelly I think. You are an inspiration Patty. Thanks again.


Ben Zoltak profile image

Ben Zoltak 16 months ago from Lake Mills, Jefferson County, Wisconsin USA

Still one of my favorites Patty, re-reading this now I realize I need to learn how to make a compote!

Write on lady,

Ben


Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty Inglish, MS 16 months ago from North America Author

Write, write, write, writ, so it is written, write some more! :)

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