How to Cook Chicken Breasts and Chicken Breast Recipes

Balmoral Chicken is just one of the recipes featured further down this page
Balmoral Chicken is just one of the recipes featured further down this page

How do you normally cook chicken breasts? Do you casserole them in the oven in some chicken stock with root vegetables? Do you pan fry them in a little flour? Perhaps you chop them up and make a curry or stir fry? The truth is that chicken breasts are so incredibly versatile there are any number of tasty ways in which they can be cooked and enjoyed. This page will look at a few ways of cooking these chicken pieces, both whole and chopped, in an attempt to give you some new and innovative ideas for cooking this delicious foodstuff. Hopefully, you will have a browse and find at least one dish which catches your eye and you would wish to serve to your family or guests.

Chicken Breast Schnitzel with Potato Salad and Sauerkraut

Chicken breast schnitzel served with a wedge of lemon, potato salad and sauerkraut in typically German fashion
Chicken breast schnitzel served with a wedge of lemon, potato salad and sauerkraut in typically German fashion
Potatoes are boiled in large chunks
Potatoes are boiled in large chunks
Mayo, peas and sweetcorn are added to the potatoes
Mayo, peas and sweetcorn are added to the potatoes
Chicken breast is wrapped in clingfilm
Chicken breast is wrapped in clingfilm
Pounded chicken breast
Pounded chicken breast
Beaten egg and breadcrumbs for schnitzel
Beaten egg and breadcrumbs for schnitzel
Schnitzel is shallow fried in oil
Schnitzel is shallow fried in oil

Schnitzel is an Austrian/German dish, most famously prepared with veal in the form of Wienerschnitzel. This recipe essentially just substitutes chicken breast for the veal.

Ingredients per Person

1 skinless chicken breast fillet
2 tbsp fresh breadcrumbs
1 beaten egg
1 large baking potato
2 tbsp mayonnaise
1 tbsp fresh or canned sweet corn
1 tbsp fresh, canned or frozen peas
2 tbsp sauerkraut
Sea salt and white pepper

Method

The potato salad should be prepared first. Peel the potato and chop it in to approximately one inch chunks. Resist the temptation to chop it any smaller at this stage, as small pieces merely become saturated with water as they cook and disintegrate. Add to some cold, slightly salted water and bring the water to a boil before reducing the heat to simmer for twenty to twenty-five minutes until softened but still firm. Drain, return the potatoes to the pot, cover and leave to cool for about an hour.

Dice the cool potatoes to about a quarter inch. Carefully mix with the mayo, corn and peas. Season, cover with clingfilm and refrigerate until required.

The chicken breast has to be pounded and flattened but unlike beef steaks, the meat is very delicate and great care is required. Lay one sheet of clingfilm on a chopping board. Lay the chicken breast on it and season with salt and pepper. Seasoning at this stage is an excellent way of distributing the flavours through the chicken meat. Lay a second sheet of clingfilm on top and gently pound the meat with the smooth side of a meat mallet or the edge of a rolling pin to a uniform thickness of about half an inch.

Beat the egg in a small, flat-bottomed bowl and spread the breadcrumbs on a small plate. Bring a couple of tablespoons of vegetable oil up to a medium heat in a non-stick frying pan. Draw the chicken breast through the egg and pat on both sides in the breadcrumbs. Repeat this process for an extra even and crispy coating. Fry for around five minutes each on a medium heat until the breadcrumbs are crisp and golden and the chicken is cooked.

Lift the chicken schnitzel from the pan with a fish slice or spatula and lay it on a plate. Add the potato salad, sauerkraut and serve immediately while the chicken is still hot.

Chicken Breast Dippers with Thai Sweet Chilli Sauce

Chicken dippers served on a bed of shredded lettuce with Thai sweet chilli dipping sauce in a ramekin
Chicken dippers served on a bed of shredded lettuce with Thai sweet chilli dipping sauce in a ramekin
Sliced breast of chicken for dippers
Sliced breast of chicken for dippers
Prepared batter for dippers
Prepared batter for dippers
Deep frying the chicken dippers
Deep frying the chicken dippers
Draining the chicken dippers
Draining the chicken dippers
Shredded lettuce is the serving bed for these chicken dippers
Shredded lettuce is the serving bed for these chicken dippers

Chicken dippers are known by a number of names and bought in many forms, both as fast food and frozen from supermarkets. Often, these creations will be made from what is considerably less than prime chicken meat. The chicken dippers in this instance are made from prime breast meat, deep fried in a basic batter, though egg and breadcrumbs could be used equally well.

Ingredients per Portion

2 chicken breast fillets
3 tbsp plain/all purpose flour
½ tsp salt
Cold water
3 fresh lettuce leaves
2 thin slices cut from half an onion
3 tbsp Thai sweet chilli dipping sauce

Method

The batter should where possible be made a half hour or so in advance and refrigerated to rest. Spoon the flour in to a plastic dish with a lid. Season with the salt and mix well. Very slowly, begin pouring cold water in to the mixture, whisking with a fork or small hand whisk until you achieve the consistency of thick cream. If you accidentally add too much cold water, simply whisk in a little more flour. Put the lid on the dish and refrigerate.

Slice each chicken breast fillets lengthwise in to three or four strips of around a quarter inch thickness. Although a deep frier can be used to make the chicken dippers, you may find it easier to use a deep frying pan, with vegetable oil to a depth of about an inch and a half. Bring the oil up to a fairly high heat.

Dip the chicken strips in to the batter to fully coat. Hold each one above the dish for a couple of seconds to let the excess drip off before very gently laying them in the hot oil. Fry for about three to four minutes each side until the batter is crisp and golden and the chicken is cooked. Remove the chicken to a plate laid with kitchen paper to drain.

Roughly shred the lettuce leaves and mix with the strands of onion. Season with salt and pepper. Form a lettuce and onion bed for the chicken and serve the dipping sauce in a small ramekin alongside.

The New Chicken Breast Cookbook
The New Chicken Breast Cookbook

350 recipes for chicken breasts featured on nearly four hundred pages. Includes recipes from white wine coq au vin, to stuffed chicken breasts, to grilled chicken breasts and salads.

 

The number of ways in which it is possible to cook and enjoy chicken breasts is far greater than could ever be explored in a work this size. If you really want to explore the full culinary possibilities afforded by succulent and tender chicken breasts, take a look at the bargain book featured to the right. In this book, you will find almost a year's worth of chicken breast recipes, surely enough to satisfy the most discerning of chicken breast aficionados.

Balmoral Chicken with Clapshot and Peppercorn Cream Sauce

Peppercorn cream sauce replaces the normal whisky cream sauce in this Balmoral Chicken recipe
Peppercorn cream sauce replaces the normal whisky cream sauce in this Balmoral Chicken recipe
Butterflied chicken breast fillet
Butterflied chicken breast fillet
Haggis filling is added to the chicken breast
Haggis filling is added to the chicken breast
Haggis stuffed chicken breast is wrapped in bacon
Haggis stuffed chicken breast is wrapped in bacon
Chicken parcel is wrapped in foil for the oven
Chicken parcel is wrapped in foil for the oven
Chopped potato and Swede for clapshot
Chopped potato and Swede for clapshot
Chopped chives are added to the mashed potato and Swede
Chopped chives are added to the mashed potato and Swede
Peppercorn cream sauce is made in a small saucepan
Peppercorn cream sauce is made in a small saucepan

Balmoral chicken is a dish comprised principally of chicken and haggis. While it is normally served with a whisky cream sauce, made from a fine single malt, this recipe sees it served merely with a black peppercorn cream sauce. This is simply because a great many people are unlikely to have a bottle of quality single malt lying around the house and may not wish to purchase one merely to make a meal accompaniment.

Ingredients per Portion

1 skinless chicken breast fillet
2 to 3oz cooked and cooled haggis
3 rashers/slices of bacon
1 large baking potato
½ very small Swede turnip/rutabaga
Tsp freshly chopped chives
Salt and white pepper
3 fl oz fresh chicken stock
3 fl oz double/heavy cream
8 to 10 whole black peppercorns (lightly crushed)

Method

Start your oven preheating to 400F/200C. Lay the chicken breast fillet on a chopping board and very carefully slice horizontally to almost but not quite cut it in half. Spread the haggis evenly over the bottom, leaving a half inch border all the way around. Fold the top back over to form a parcel.

Lay three rashers of bacon on the chopping board, side by side (see image). Place the chicken breast in the centre and carefully wrap the bacon around it. Place the parcel on a sheet of foil, trying to ensure the bacon ends are on the bottom. This will help prevent separation during cooking and poor presentation. Carefully fold the foil up to form a loose but sealed tent. Put the wrapped chicken on a baking tray or sheet and in to the oven for half an hour. (Note that all the seasoning required should already be in the haggis and the bacon).

Peel the potato and Swede/rutabaga and chop in to one inch chunks. Add to a pot of slightly salted cold water and bring to a boil. Simmer for twenty to twenty-five minutes until softened. Drain well and return to the pot. Add a little butter and season with white pepper. Mash with a hand masher before adding the chives and stirring through with a spoon.

Remove the chicken breast from the oven, very carefully unwrap and pierce with a skewer to ensure the juices run clear and it is fully cooked. Rewrap and leave to rest while the cream and peppercorn sauce is prepared.

Add the chicken stock to a small saucepan and bring to a simmer before slowly stirring in the cream. Crush the peppercorns in a pestle and mortar and add them to the pan. Cook on a moderate simmer for a couple of minutes to reduce and thicken.

Spoon the clapshot on to a heated plate. This should be done fairly haphazardly to create a rustic effect. Slice the chicken breast in half at an angle and plate propped up against the clapshot. Spoon the sauce over the chicken and serve.

Chicken, Leek and Mushroom Pie

Chicken, leek and mushroom pie with minted mashed potatoes and Brussels sprouts
Chicken, leek and mushroom pie with minted mashed potatoes and Brussels sprouts
Filling ingredients for the pie
Filling ingredients for the pie
Sauteeing the chicken and leek in oil
Sauteeing the chicken and leek in oil
Chicken, leek and mushroom pie is ready to be topped with pastry
Chicken, leek and mushroom pie is ready to be topped with pastry
Chicken, leek and mushroom pie is ready for the oven
Chicken, leek and mushroom pie is ready for the oven
Chicken, leek and mushroom pie
Chicken, leek and mushroom pie

Ingredients

½ lb diced chicken breast meat
6 small closed cup mushrooms
1 small leak
1 pint fresh chicken stock
½ lb puff pastry
Beaten egg for glazing
3 medium to large potatoes
Brussels sprouts (quantity as desired)
Tsp freshly chopped mint
Butter
Salt and white pepper

Method

Wash the leek and trim off the leaves and any remaining root. Slice in to discs of around a quarter inch in thickness.

Put a little bit of vegetable oil in a large stew pot and gently heat. Add the diced chicken, season and stir with a wooden spoon until the chicken pieces have all turned evenly opaque and are sealed. Add the leek and stir for another minute before pouring in the chicken stock. Bring to a gentle simmer for fifteen minutes.

Turn off the heat. Cut each mushroom in half and add them to the pot. Stir, put the lid on the pot and leave for at least an hour to completely cool. This is absolutely essential, as using a hot filling will spoil the pastry before it can start to cook, rise and crisp.

Preheat your oven to 400F/200C. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the chicken, leek and mushroom to a 9" x 6" pie dish. Pour in enough stock to almost but not quite cover the solids.

Roll out your pastry on a floured surface until just slightly larger than your pie dish. Place it carefully on top of the dish and tuck it over around the edges. Glaze with the beaten egg and cut a steam vent in the centre. Bake for thirty to forty minutes, until the pastry is beautifully risen and golden.

Peel and chop the potatoes. Add to a large pot of salted cold water. Bring to a boil and simmer for around twenty-five minutes until soft. Drain and mash with butter, white pepper and chopped mint.

The Brussels sprouts should be added to boiling, salted water for ten to twelve minutes until tender but not overly softened.

Cut the pie pastry in half. Use a large, slotted spoon to lay half the pie filling on each of two plates with the pastry on top. An ice cream scoop makes attractive presentation for the potatoes, before the sprouts are added last of all.

How Do You Like Chicken Breasts Cooked and Served?

Hopefully, this page has given you a few additional ideas for cooking with chicken breasts. Thanks you for spending some time reading through it. Any feedback or comments you have may be left in the space below.

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16 comments

Robin profile image

Robin 4 years ago from San Francisco

The chicken, leek and mushroom pie looks delicious! We had chicken for dinner last night. Paul brined the chicken, covered it in spices and barbecued it. It was delicious. We had roasted potatoes and tomatoes with it. It was really healthy and yummy. Thanks for all of the recipes. I'm always looking for new ways to cook chicken!


RTalloni profile image

RTalloni 4 years ago from the short journey

The chicken leek and mushroom pie sounds quite fabulous, and just the thing for these winter nights.

We like smoked poultry best of all, and we use it in main dishes with vegetables, in soups, and in salads.


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 4 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom Author

Hi, Robin. Thanks very much for the visit and comment. I love chicken as a foodstuff and am constantly experimenting with new ways for cooking it. Your barbecued chicken sounds absolutely delicious and healthy. The weather here is a constant frustration for me that I don't have that option :)

Hi, RTalloni. The chicken and leek pie is definitely a Winter warmer. I hope you enjoy it if you give it a try. You have actually given me an idea, re smoking. I have smoked duck many times and turkey a few times but don't ever remember smoking chicken. I need to give that a go the next time I have access to my brother's smokers! Thanks for the visit and the inspiration :)


K9keystrokes profile image

K9keystrokes 4 years ago from Northern, California

Chicken Dippers with Thai Sweet Chilli Sauce look pretty darn yummy Gordon! I love to roast a simple chicken with salt, pepper, and lemon and sage butter. I make a honey balsamic reduction as a dipping sauce on side. When dinner is done, I then make traditional soup out of the carcass and leftovers! Yum!

I am a bit hesitant to feast on the haggis stuffed chicken recipe you offer, but since its one of your recipes there must be a good side to haggis I am not aware of! However, my Da would love the recipe! Even as my Scottish heritage taste buds [da's side] should have acquired a taste for the highland delight, I have yet to appreciate its tasty wonders. I am more apt to enjoy a good blintz or bagel with a schmear [Jewish mother]! Some very interesting conversations at our dinner table because of this mixed background. Possibly your haggis recipe is the flavor temptation I need to pursue it as a lovely meal!? In any case, great picture by picture recipes and very clear direction my friend! I would expect nothing less from your talented mind!

I hope you are doing well, and that 2012 sits lightly on your heart bringing treasures of joy and happiness.

Huge HubHugs Gordon~

K9


stephhicks68 profile image

stephhicks68 4 years ago from Bend, Oregon

Another great recipe hub, Gordon! Its important to cook chicken thoroughly, and you have some delicious looking dishes. Love all the photographs, and easy to follow instructions. Best, Steph


randomcreative profile image

randomcreative 4 years ago from Milwaukee, Wisconsin

I love the mix of recipes here! My favorite way to cook chicken breasts is chopped into cubes and pan cooked with olive oil, garlic, salt, pepper, and Mrs. Dash. You can eat just about any side dish with this kind of chicken.


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 4 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom Author

Firstly, sorry for late reply to you all! Strange and busy weekend :)

K9, great to hear from you my friend. Your chicken idea sounds amazing and I wish more people would take the time to make more of chickens in this way. Haggis? I'll let you in to a secret about that in that I never touched it from childhood until about three or four years ago - I (thought) I hated it! It was only circa 2007/8 that I was persuaded to try it again after so many years and actually found it quite agreeable. It is quite spicy and delectable and here is an idea specifically for you that I just made up this minute - what about a haggis bagel??? That could be interesting...??? I can imagine the differences in culture in your formative years but I'm glad they combined to produce such a wonderful person :)

Hi, Steph. Definitely a very important message about chicken and that it should never be undercooked - no exceptions. Glad you like the ideas and thanks for stopping by and commenting.

Hi, randomcreative. Thanks for visiting and I like your stir fry idea for cooking chicken. For many years, Chinese cooking styles were the only way for me and although I have diversified, I still love this style of cooking.


tonymead60 profile image

tonymead60 4 years ago from Yorkshire

Hi Gordon,

another fine hub with a very tasty theme. I like the idea of the haggis stuffing; that will really give it a flavour kick. I think my favourite chicken pie is chicken and ham which is an ingredient marriage made in heaven. Given you the votes as usual.

Cheers Tony


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 4 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom Author

Hi, Tony and thanks. The haggis certainly does infuse the chicken breast with flavour and this is also delicious made with black pudding. Chicken and ham pies are a big favourite of mine also, especially with a bit of mushroom in there as well. Cheers.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 4 years ago from Houston, Texas

Hi Gordon,

As you say, chicken breasts are so versatile and you have given us some great examples of different preparation methods with your good sounding recipes. Thanks! Up and useful.


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 4 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom Author

Thanks, Peggy. Yes, there are virtually no limitations with chicken breasts. Hope you enjoy anything from here which you try.


Marcy Goodfleisch profile image

Marcy Goodfleisch 4 years ago from Planet Earth

The chicken, leek and mushroom pie sounds heavenly! I'm glad you mentioned letting the filling cool - I've been doing that the wrong way for many years! Voted up and useful. And bookmarked.


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 4 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom Author

Hi, Marcy. I'm glad that enjoyed the Hub and found it useful. Letting the filling cool before putting on the pastry makes a huge difference to the end result. Thanks for the visit and comment.


James Peters profile image

James Peters 4 years ago from Hammond, Indiana

Dude...

This blows away EVERY recipe I've ever written.

Right On!

I mean... WRITE ON!

Thumbs Up & More


Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 4 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom Author

Hi, James. Thank you very much for the comment. Sorry to have been so long in getting back to you. I hope you enjoy anything you try here and it inspires you to go on and be creative with chicken. It's the perfect ingredient for experimentation and development.


Kristen Howe profile image

Kristen Howe 10 months ago from Northeast Ohio

Gordon, great recipes. Hold the chili! I might try them sometime this year.

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