Dilly Beans: How to Pickle Green Beans

 Dilly beans are delightfully tangy, with a pleasant crunch.  My family enjoys them with all sorts of  meals, such as roast, baked chicken, turkey -- served in any manner, and hamburgers.  When I serve dilly beans, I never have to worry about someone not getting enough vegtables for the day.

 Dilly beans, sometimes called Dilled Green Beans, are easy to make, even if you have never made pickles before, and take relatively little time to process.    Pickling green beans is a great alternative to freezing them, especially if your freezer space is limited.

I am sharing my recipe in single jar amounts, so that you can customize it for the amount of beans you have on hand.

Equipment Needed:

  • Water Bath Canner, or Steam Canner
  • Canning jars, rings and new lids
  • Ladle
  • Canning funnel
  • Tongs or magnetic lid lifter
  • butter knife or bubble remover
  • Jar lifter
  • Timer or clock
  • Towel, to cool jars on

Note: If you are buying new jars, I highly recommend wide-mouth jars, as they are much easier to clean.

If your jars are used, check for hairline cracks in the bottoms of jars. If you find any, do not use that jar for this recipe, as the water canning might cause them to break. Save them for decrotive purposes, or recipes where inversion canning, as illistrated in this article, can be used.

Snap or cut ends.
Snap or cut ends.
Wash and drain beans.
Wash and drain beans.
Pack lengthwise into clean jars.
Pack lengthwise into clean jars.
Add chilly, galric and dill.
Add chilly, galric and dill.
Heat water, vinegar and salt to boiling.  Adjust recipe to meet the # of jars you have filled.
Heat water, vinegar and salt to boiling. Adjust recipe to meet the # of jars you have filled.
Finished quart jar of dilly beans.
Finished quart jar of dilly beans.

Quart Jar Recipe

This recipe is for 1 quart jar. Increase recipe according to the amount of beans you are pickling.

  • 3/4 pound whole green beans
  • 2 dried chilly peppers or 1/2 teaspoons red pepper flakes
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2 dill heads or 2 teaspoon dill seed
  • 1 1/2 cups vinegar
  • 1 1/2cups water
  • 2 tablespoons salt

Method:

  1. Wash beans, cut off ends.
  2. Pack beans lengthwise into clean hot jars, leaving 1/4" head room.
  3. Add garlic, dill head or dill seeds, and chilly peppers or 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes to each quart jar.
  4. Heat vinegar, water and salt to boiling. Pour over beans, boiling hot. Adjust lid(s) and process in Boiling-Water Bath 10 minutes.
  5. Cool in a draft free areas, check seals, store any jars that did not seal properly in the refrigerator. Be sure to label with name and date.

Makes 1 quart jar.

It takes about 2 weeks for full flavor to develop.

Pint Jar Recipe

This recipe is for 1 pint jar. Increase recipe according to the amount of beans you are pickling.

  • 30-40 whole green beans
  • 1 dried chili pepper or 1/4 teaspoons red pepper flakes
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 dill head or 1 teaspoon dill seed
  • 3/4 cups vinegar
  • 3/4 cups water
  • 1 tablespoon salt

Method:

  1. Wash beans, cut off ends.
  2. Pack beans lengthwise into clean hot jars, leaving 1/4" head room.
  3. Add garlic, dill head or dill seeds, and chilly pepper or 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes to each pint jar.
  4. Heat vinegar, water and salt to boiling. Pour over beans, boiling hot. Adjust lid(s) and process in Boiling-Water Bath 10 minutes.
  5. Cool in a draft free areas, check seals, store any jars that did not seal properly in the refrigerator. Be sure to label with name and date.

Makes 1 pint jar.

It takes about 2 weeks for full flavor to develop.

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Comments 11 comments

Jarn profile image

Jarn 6 years ago from Sebastian, Fl

I love string beans as they are, but those look mighty tasty.


Hello, hello, profile image

Hello, hello, 6 years ago from London, UK

Very good tips. Thank you


Christa Dovel profile image

Christa Dovel 6 years ago from The Rocky Mountains, North America Author

Jarn, we love green beans just cooked too, but when you have 12 pounds of them on hand, there is no way they are all going to get eaten. Plus, these are easy to serve, as all of the work is already done. :)

Your welcome, Hello, hello.


Farmerboy 6 years ago

Looks like your keeping busy, have any help canning them? :)

It is nice to have some different ways to use some of the garden produce, as when it is in season there seems to so much more than what one can use at that time.

Keep up the good work, and providing for your family.


Christa Dovel profile image

Christa Dovel 6 years ago from The Rocky Mountains, North America Author

Thanks Farmerboy. I tend to send the 'help' out to dig, when it comes time to can, but they like picking things.


LiftedUp profile image

LiftedUp 6 years ago from Plains of Colorado

What a nice lot of beans you had! Were they all from your garden? Lovely photos too.


Christa Dovel profile image

Christa Dovel 6 years ago from The Rocky Mountains, North America Author

Thank you LiftedUp. And yes, all of these beans were from my garden.


ButterflyWings profile image

ButterflyWings 5 years ago

Somehow I missed this article when it first came out. I have used a similar recipe, but these look extremely appealing. I congratulate you on your photos...your little touches, like the potted herb, make the difference between just-a-produce-picture, and really pretty. :)


Christa Dovel profile image

Christa Dovel 5 years ago from The Rocky Mountains, North America Author

Thank you ButterflyWings. My family adores these pickled beans. And thank you for noticing the pictures. :)


imranhaider 5 years ago

nice hubs activity


Christa Dovel profile image

Christa Dovel 5 years ago from The Rocky Mountains, North America Author

Thank you Imranhaider.

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