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Gluten free ... what ... ?

  1. Rochelle Frank profile image89
    Rochelle Frankposted 2 years ago

    When I buy a cleaning product, I need to check the small print on the label carefully to make sure it will not harm the septic system.  I found one today that was touted as "natural" and was also surprised to see it was also labeled as "gluten -free".
    I did not know this made a difference, since the product was a toilet cleaner.
    Who knew?

    1. Shades-of-truth profile image87
      Shades-of-truthposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      Thank the Lord, Rochelle! A "gluten-free" toilet bowl cleaner! Now you can rest assured that your commode will not have a stomach ache. What a rare commodity - pun intended.

      1. DzyMsLizzy profile image91
        DzyMsLizzyposted 2 years ago in reply to this

        Roflmao, Shades-of-truth!  That's a classic!

    2. favored profile image56
      favoredposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      Rochelle Frank do you  have a photo of the product and name of the item.  I'd like to send it to my sister.

      1. Rochelle Frank profile image89
        Rochelle Frankposted 2 years ago in reply to this

        Called: Seventh Generation Toilet bowl Natural Cleaner. (Google it to find a photo.)

  2. tirelesstraveler profile image88
    tirelesstravelerposted 2 years ago

    I'll be, you never know when you are going to  inhale your cleaning products. Sounds like a good marketing gimmick, but I suppose inhaling gluten could be a problem.  Still, for the life of me I can't figure out what would be in cleaning products that would have gluten other than coloring.  Lots of food grade coloring has gluten.

  3. Dressage Husband profile image80
    Dressage Husbandposted 2 years ago

    Gluten could be being used in some cleaners to make them stickier. I am thinking of products like scrubbing bubbles, but I am at a loss as to why they would think to add that unless people ate it sometimes as I do not think mere contact triggers celiacs. Maybe someone else knows better on that?

    1. IslandBites profile image84
      IslandBitesposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      Why? Because gluten free is a fad.

  4. Kathy Stutzman profile image88
    Kathy Stutzmanposted 2 years ago

    I cook for a number of people who are both gluten-free and celiacs as well as people who are gluten-free because of an intolerance to wheat gluten, but not as dramatically impacted as celiacs.

    The "allergy" can manifest itself in a wide spectrum of ways and some of the people for whom I cook report skin sensitivity to products which either contain gluten or are manufactured in a facility that may have processed food or other items with gluten.

    People with special sensitivities have got to read labels in ways that we may not always be aware of, especially if we have no known sensitivity. Reading labels is critical in all products that we use, consume or absorb through inhaling or our skin. I was really amazed at many of the ingredients listed on labels - it is a good exercise especially if someone you know has an intolerance to any product or chemical.

    1. Rochelle Frank profile image89
      Rochelle Frankposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      Thank you for that, Kathy. I had no idea.  I was thinking it was merely a "jump-on the bandwagon" type of thing, putting the latest buzz word like "lo-fat" or "all natural". on any product.
      I'll have to say,though, it does sound a little odd. Most people I have mentioned it to, thought it was hilarious.

      1. Sed-me profile image82
        Sed-meposted 2 years ago in reply to this

        Love, love, love that new pic. Rochelle.

      2. Kathy Stutzman profile image88
        Kathy Stutzmanposted 2 years ago in reply to this

        Rochelle, I join in your laughter as well - it could likely be a gimmick and when you read labels as closely as I do, you would crack-up quite a bit. I am often caught snickering down the aisles. We have to laugh too right?

 
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